Alternate Wikipedia Infoboxes VII (Do Not Post Current Politics or Political Figures Here)

Here's an infobox of the 2004 Canadian federal election. The POD for this is that Paul Martin calls an election soon after becoming prime minister, catching the opposition off guard. The Liberals win their projected massive landslide, surpassing the Progressive Conservative Party's 1984 victory by one seat. Martin's victory allows his tenure to go much smoother than OTl.
That's an interesting parallel with a discussion I was having in r/TheCampaignTrail. Someone's making a mod for the 1984 Liberal leadership convention, and I joked that I hope there's an option for Turner to take the advice he got: wait until Parliament's term expired in 1985, build up a record to campaign on, and then run on that. They replied that the 1984 election was a far closer thing than I assumed, and Turner ended up shooting himself in the foot a lot with gaffes. I assumed it was a standard opinion in hindsight that Turner calling a snap election was a blunder and that's why Mulroney clobbered him, lol.
 
That's an interesting parallel with a discussion I was having in r/TheCampaignTrail. Someone's making a mod for the 1984 Liberal leadership convention, and I joked that I hope there's an option for Turner to take the advice he got: wait until Parliament's term expired in 1985, build up a record to campaign on, and then run on that. They replied that the 1984 election was a far closer thing than I assumed, and Turner ended up shooting himself in the foot a lot with gaffes. I assumed it was a standard opinion in hindsight that Turner calling a snap election was a blunder and that's why Mulroney clobbered him, lol.
Turner had a better chance in 1988 tbh. I think calling an election a year later in 1985 might've helped, but the Liberals would've been defeated regardless.
 
After a short hiatus, here's another entry in the Hamlinverse timeline. I have a couple more infoboxes done and am hoping to post them later this weekend.


Countersecession was an American political movement during the First Southron Revolt by southern unionists opposed to secession from the United States. Between December 1860 and May 1861, eleven southern states seceded from the United States to form the Confederate States of America in the aftermath of Abraham Lincoln's election as president. From the very start, there was opposition to secession in most of these states but many formerly southern southern made peace with secession and became loyal to the Confederacy. In several southern states, opposition to secession spawned movements to establish new state governments in geographically limited portions of former states that would remain loyal to the federal government. Ultimately, four countersecessionist states were admitted as American states.

Countersecession had a number of factors that spawned the movement. Loyalty to the federal government was significant, but countersecessionist movements often played into previously existing regional rivalries. Typically, countersecessionist regions were poorer, far from the state capital, and less reliant on slavery than other parts of the state. For example, New Virginia was founded out of the mountainous portions of western Virginia where there were few large plantations. Nickajack was established by residents of the mountainous eastern third of Tennessee, who had fewer slaves than the middle and west of the state and were Whigs, whereas the rest of Tennessee voted Democratic.

Supporters of countersecession are known as counterseceders. Counterseceders differ from unionists in that unionists merely opposed secession, but some later changed their views or grudgingly supported the Southron war effort. Counterseceders did not compromise with the Confederacy and the name includes only those that took active or passive resistance against the Confederate government.

Very early on in the war, the Hamlin administration made it a priority to establish ties with the counterseceders in western Virginia and eastern Tennessee and Garibaldi's Bristol Expedition, though it failed to succeed in opening a path from the Ohio to Knoxville, put wind into the sails of countersecession in the Appalachians. In the war years, countersecessionist governments received varying levels of support and recognition from Congress and federal military leaders.

Countersecessionist movements existed in many southern states, but violence and repression by secessionists subdued many attempts to form countersecessionist governments. Four countersecessionist states were admitted to the Union. New Virginia was made out of mountainous western Virginia, the Shenandoah Valley, and portions of northern Virginia. Nickajack was formed from the grand division of Eastern Tennessee. Jackson encompassed the Appalachian northern portions of Georgia and Alabama. Steuben was established by German-speaking unionists west of the Brazos River. Several countersecessionist stats were quashed out. An attempt to found a new state in the Ozark Mountains of northwest Arkansas was ended by a Confederate offensive in the fall of 1863. A separate movement in the mountains of western North Carolina fizzled out because of a lack of popular support.

The countersecessionist states saw little military occupation in American Reformation following the First Southron Revolt. In all four states, multiparty democracy emerged by the end of the 1860s. Because of their birth in the crucible of revolt, all four sided with the federal government in the Second Southron Revolt. Later on, because of an image of being yeomen states as opposed to plantation plutocracies, they veered towards the political left and became hotbeds of support for the Agrarian Party.

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POD: Assassination of Abraham Lincoln, Abraham Lincoln, and Frederick Street Massacre
First Southron Revolt: The Bristol Expedition
First Southron Revolt: Trans-Sabine Theater
First Southron Revolt: Battle of Montgomery
1864 US election: National Union and Radical conventions
1864 US election: Democratic and Constitutional Union conventions
1866 Steuben gubernatorial election
Blue Custer stamp (1899-1905)
Alaskan Revolution (1907-1908)
James Aggrey, US Representative (1875-1935)
 
yeomen states as opposed to plantation plutocracies
so, even with much more radical Reconstruction, there still were "plantation plutocracies" at TTL South?
Also - what category would be the state of South Caroline, with their, as I understand, Freedman-dominated regime?
 
so, even with much more radical Reconstruction, there still were "plantation plutocracies" at TTL South?
Also - what category would be the state of South Caroline, with their, as I understand, Freedman-dominated regime?
No, the plantation plutocracies are utterly wiped out by the 1870s. The Countersecessionist states are comparing themselves with the pre-war governments of Virginia, Tennessee, Georgia, and Alabama, which they see as having been dominated by plantation owners. This is just their image of themselves and in reality, things are more compliacted. Former slave owners make up a number of the early political leaders in these new states so the self-image of Countersecession having been carried out by poor farmers alone is false.

South Carolina becomes dominated by freedmen especially when it is considered that there is Confederate outmigration. Within a couple years after the war, multiracial democracy will emerge. It will remain that way for decades.
 
The 1865 Jackson gubernatorial election was held on September 5, 1865 to choose the first elected governor of the newly-admitted state. A provisional government for the state was established at the Dalton Convention in fall 1863 by unionists from northern Georgia and Alabama opposed to the Confederate States. It received limited recognition from federal military commanders and even sent a shadow congressional delegation to Washington to lobby for statehood but Congress did not act until the very end of the First Southron Revolt. In February 1865, the issue of the state of Jackson was finally taken up and it was granted statehood with little opposition in recognition for the assistance provided to the war effort by the region's unionists.

Since the Dalton Convention, Presley Yates had served as interim governor but he chose not to run in 1865. He was nominally affiliated with the Democratic Party, which had been the strongest political party in the region before the start of the war. In the power vacuum following the First Southron Revolt, political parties in the south and especially in Jackson were only loosely organized.

Three primary candidates emerged in the race to succeed Yates. Williamson Cobb, a former Democratic congressman from Jackson County in the Tennessee Valley, ran under the Democratic label. Despite being a plantation owner who owned slaves, Cobb positioned himself as a populist in the Jacksonian mould and promised to break the power of the plantation elite that had previously dominated the politics of both Georgia and Alabama.

Robert M. Patton, from the far western part of the state was a former Whig who had served as president of the Alabama Senate on two occasions was the choice of the Unionist Party. The Unionists were an alliance of former Whigs, Know Nothings, and even some Democrats. However, in Jackson, where the Whigs had never been very strong, the Unionists were weaker than they were in the other Countersecessionist States of Nickajack and New Virginia. Patton's campaign attempted to appeal to fears that Cobb's Democrats had supported the Southron cause in the recent conflict.

A third candidate, Methodist preacher and former state legislator Henry C. Sanford, openly described himself as a "radical Republican" He hastily organized a Republican ticket focused on land reform, the expansion of education, and support for the state's freedmen. By the time of the election, the 14th Amendment had been passed and freedmen were theoretically eligible to vote, but there had been little attempt to organize them as a political force. Most Republicans in Jackson were African-American and they worked tirelessly to encourage freedmen to vote, but with only varying success.

Interestingly, all three candidates were from the formerly Alabama portion of Jackson, something that was commented upon in the formerly Georgian counties. The power of the pre-war Democratic Party in the state was simply too strong to be defeated and Cobb won election with 58% of the vote. Democrats swept most of the state's other offices as well and took decisive control of the legislature. Cobb would go on to be reelected to a second term in 1867 and switched parties to join Stephen Douglas and the 1868 National Union Party.

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The 1867 Jackson gubernatorial election was held on March 12, 1867 to elect the Governor of the state of Jackson. Since Democrat Williamson Cobb's election in 1865, the state had been largely controlled by the Democrats. Indeed, Jackson's history with the Democrats extended into the Antebellum era when the counties in both Georgia and Alabama that would later form Jackson had been the most Democratic and anti-Whig. Partly, this could be ascribed to the comparatively lower rate of slave ownership that existed in the region compared to the rest of the south. Jacksonians saw themselves as yeoman farmers, as opposed to the rich plantation owners that had controlled the states they seceded from. This belief was not wholly correct, especially in light of the fact that in the 1860 Census, slaves made up nearly 25% of the population of the counties that would later form Jackson. Incumbent governor Cobb was selected for renomination by the Democratic Party.

After its poor showing in the 1865 election, support for the Unionist Party had declined in the state. It was most supported by large landowners and urban dwellers. In the 1865 election, results had mirrored the politics of the 1840s and 1850s, with formerly Whig counties voting heavily for the Unionists. The Unionists selected as their candidate Warren Akin Sr. of Cass County in former Georgia. A lawyer by trade, Akin was a pre-war Whig and former slaveowner.

The upstart Republican Party had grown by leaps and bounds. Established by the Methodist preacher Henry C. Sanford in 1865 as a vehicle for his election campaign, the Republicans had organized freedmen into a political machine in the western third of the state along the fertile banks of the Tennessee River. This part of the state had a large population of slaves prior to the Southron Revolt and it had become the state's Republican stronghold. Republican strength also came from Northern migrants to the south, though there were comparatively fewer of them in Jackson than in other southern states. The Jackson Republican's held the state's third congressional district which encompassed the entire western third of the state and in 1866 they had elected Columbus Jones as the first African-American to the United States Congress. Sanford co-opted Cobb's populist rhetoric, but explicitly included African-Americans in his calls for the breaking of large landholdings and free (though Christian) public education. In a meeting of Republican leaders in Decatur, Sanford was selected for the nomination over African-American state representative James T. Rapier, who was considered too young to be the party's nominee. Sanford would attempt to appeal to poor white voters but was not especially successful in creating a multi-racial Republican Party in the state.

Finally, a fourth party, the Conservatives, came into being. It was the most explicitly pro-Confederate and sought support from former Confederates and Confederate sympathizers. The Conservatives were the party most opposed to African-American suffrage and on the campaign trail Conservative candidates were most open in their talk of establishing a white-only government for the state. Their ticket was headed up by John William Henderson Underwood of Floyd County. Conservative Party support came primarily from former Democrats.

The election campaign was hard-fought. The Unionist ticket began to fade into irrelevance as its platform was quite vague in comparison to the other three parties. Governor Cobb's Democratic machine was able to bring out white voters to win most of the state's counties, but the well-organized Republicans were able to win half a dozen counties as African-American voters turned out nearly to a man in favor of Sanford. The near-total collapse of the Unionists mirrored the decline of that party nationwide and it came fourth in the popular vote behind the Conservatives and it failed to win even a single county. The Conservative Party performed best in counties with racially divided populations, where white voters feared the growing electoral power of the state's freedmen. The final results are illusory. Despite winning under half of the vote, there was little of chance of a loss for the Democrats. The Republicans were anathema to most voters in the state and there is almost no chance that they could have gained 20 points and overtaken the Democrats. Cobb's victory ensured Democrats had a majority in the state legislature though both the Republicans and Conservatives held a number of seats there and would prove to be a thorn in the side during the governor's second term. In the aftermath of the election, there was discussion in northern Republican circles over the strong showing of the Jackson Conservatives and whether some sort of intervention was warranted to prevent the further growth of the movement.

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The 1869 Jackson gubernatorial election was held on March 16, 1869 to elect the governor of the state of Jackson. Incumbent Governor Williamson Cobb had served two terms, first elected in 1865 as a Democrat and reelected in 1867. During the split of the Democratic Party in 1868, Cobb and most of the state's Democrats had gone for Stephen Douglas and joined the newly-formed National Union Party. [1] The national split of the party was mirrored in Jackson where the majority of Democrats left the party but a minority remained. In Jackson, these remainers fused with the white supremacist Conservative Party.

Incumbent National Union governor Williamson Cobb declined to run for a third term. No governor of either Alabama or Georgia had ever served more than two terms so Cobb's actions established a precedent within the new state. The state's Democrats selected George S. Houston as their candidate for governor. Houston was first elected to the Alabama legislature in 1831 as a Jacksonian and served in Congress from 1843 to 1861 except for a single two year period. Houston's campaign was centered on clean government and the expansion of public education. Whereas in the 1865 and 1867 campaigns, Cobb had largely not discussed the presence of freedmen in the state, Houston's campaign explicitly made appeals to white voters and talked of marginalizing African-American political power.

The Republican Party met in the state capital of Ellijay. The tireless work of organizers like Henry C. Sanford (who would come to be known as the Father of the Jackson Republican Party), Columbus Jones, and Lafayette Robinson had forged the state's freedmen into a solid political bloc with a stranglehold on state and federal posts in the western third of Jackson. Prior to the 1869 election, Sanford had been working to expand the Republican Party in the mountain communities of eastern Jackson where he hoped he could create a new base of support for the party. Despite several possible credible candidates, the state Republicans nominated Sanford for a third time in honor of his work to establish the Republican Party within the state.

After Williamson Cobb and his allies endorsed Stephen Douglas's National Union ticket and joined that new party, a rump of the Democrats joined with the upstart Conservative Party. One of the major issues for the Democrats in this period was finding candidates for public office. As all Confederate veterans and officeholders were excluded from elected positions by the 15th Amendment, the Democrats in Jackson were often forced to select either previously apolitical figures or old men who had Antebellum political careers but were too old to serve in the Confederate forces. The Democrats nominated Duff Green as their candidate for governor. Green had previously been a journalist, railroad builder, and in the early days of the Southron Revolt, a contractor providing iron and horseshoes for the Confederate Army. His pre-war states rights rhetoric made him the ideal choice for the Democrats, whose platform was centered on marginalizing the power of freedmen in the state.

Ultimately, the popularity of Governor Cobb won the day and his support for George S. Houston swung the election in favor of the National Union. The Democrats fared rather poorly but this can be explained by the fact they courted votes from Confederate veterans, which went over poorly among union men in a state that was formed because of its opposition to the Confederacy. The actual policies of the Democrats were not especially unpopular among National Union voters. The Republicans received under a third of the vote but won by large margins in their western and eastern strongholds and their position as an opposition party remained secure.

[1] - Which should not be confused with the related but separate 1864-1868 National Union Party.

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POD: Assassination of Abraham Lincoln, Abraham Lincoln, and Frederick Street Massacre
First Southron Revolt: The Bristol Expedition
First Southron Revolt: Trans-Sabine Theater
First Southron Revolt: Battle of Montgomery
First Southron Revolt: Countersecession
1864 US election: National Union and Radical conventions
1864 US election: Democratic and Constitutional Union conventions
1866 Steuben gubernatorial election
Blue Custer stamp (1899-1905)
Alaskan Revolution (1907-1908)
James Aggrey, US Representative (1875-1935)
 
Does anyone remember a series of infoboxes (or maybe it was a bunch of them in one image) showing a second civil war in the US in the early 1870s?
 
What changed ITTL to make it like that?
Didn't think it out too much, but basically Lincoln doesn't force it through to become a state, it declines like OTL but a hardcore group of prohibitionists stops the turn toward gambling, booze and divorces in OTL, so the state just never takes off. By 1930-40 the area is more valuable as a non-state dumping group.
 
Didn't think it out too much, but basically Lincoln doesn't force it through to become a state, it declines like OTL but a hardcore group of prohibitionists stops the turn toward gambling, booze and divorces in OTL, so the state just never takes off. By 1930-40 the area is more valuable as a non-state dumping group.
Ah, okay, so it's basically America's Landfill
 
The 1988 Election in Kyokuverse

KV1988Gen.png


A Kyokuverse TLDR:
- Limited Japanese colonization in the Vancouver Area
- Kyoku is the lower British Columbia area, more asian different cities and all that
- Space Exploration is a larger deal
- Pres Neil Armstrong and VP Cliff Finch in 1980 and 1984

the lore is being reworked from it's old days on the thread, so consider all the stuff on that old thread non-canon
 
The 1988 Election in Kyokuverse

View attachment 916656

A Kyokuverse TLDR:
- Limited Japanese colonization in the Vancouver Area
- Kyoku is the lower British Columbia area, more asian different cities and all that
- Space Exploration is a larger deal
- Pres Neil Armstrong and VP Cliff Finch in 1980 and 1984

the lore is being reworked from it's old days on the thread, so consider all the stuff on that old thread non-canon
Wouldn't Biden be considered Current Pol?
 
Next up is Nevada. I struggled with this one so thanks to @Mechadogzilla . Basically, what if NV never became a state but remained a territory?

nevada.png
What's with the weird failed links to the Washoe people for the aircraft development facilities and the Second World War? Also, why does Nevada drive on the left instead of the right like the rest of the US?

Since I assume Las Vegas doesn't exist, I guess people will be going to Atlantic City for their gambling.
 
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