Alternate Wikipedia Infoboxes VII (Do Not Post Current Politics or Political Figures Here)


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This infobox is of a movie parody that's in an actual movie, specifically Austinpussy shown at the beginning and end of Austin Powers: Goldmember.

Known cast as follows:

  • Tom Cruise as Austin Powers
  • Gwyneth Paltrow as Dixie Normois
  • Kevin Spacey as Dr. Evil
  • Danny DeVito as Mini-Me
  • John Travolta as Goldmember
Steven Spielberg is the director of the movie.
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Hubert Horatio Humphrey Jr. (May 27, 1911 – December 13, 1976) was an American pharmacist, politician, defector, and spy who became a central figure in several Cold War-era incidents.

Born in Wallace, South Dakota, Humphrey attended the University of Minnesota. In 1943, he became a professor of political science at Macalester College and ran a failed campaign for mayor of Minneapolis. He helped organize the short-livederger between the Minnesota Democratic Party and the Farmer–Labor Party (DFL) in 1944; the next year he was elected mayor of Minneapolis, serving until 1948 and successfully advocated for the inclusion of a proposal to end racial segregation in the 1948 Democratic National Convention's party platform and was shortly elected to the Senate.

However despite his prior anti-Communist statements Humphrey would cause shock and confusion in 1950 when, obstentably on a trip to Austria for policy reasons, he defected to the Soviet Union. This action is generally considered the beginning of the Second Red Scare, with the disastrous impacts on Civil Liberties that entailed. Despite much speculation, no viable explanation has ever been found for his actions. Even declassified NKVD records show the agency had no idea he would be defecting until he did.

Humphrey’s time in Stalin’s Soviet Union was rocky and uneven. Feted as an American defector, yet simultaneously feared as a possible spy. Humphrey would avoid being purged as a result of his propaganda value, but was not given much behavior and his ceremonial role.

Humphrey, however, had become close with Nikita Khrushchev, bonding over their shared farming heritage. When Khrushchev emerged ascendent after Stalin’s death, he began to utilize Humphrey more as a diplomatic tool and for his insight into the American kind. His advice during the Cuban Missile Crisis are regarded as helping avert disaster. Humphrey remained influential even as Khrushchev’s power waned. Working closely with Anastas Mikoyan as the last of the Old Bolsheviks took the reins for a time, Humphrey found himself actually involved in the government of the Soviet Union for the first time. Humphrey played a key role in Alexei Kosygin’s rise to power.

However upon his diagnosis with bladder cancer in 1976, Humphrey arrived in the American embassy with a cache of important Soviet documents, announcing his attention to redefect. This action shocked the CIA, who had been rebuffed by Humphrey several times. Refusing treatment, Humphrey died before his fate could be determined back in the United States. Humphrey is the highest ranking defector from both the United States and the Soviet Union.

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Hubert Horatio Humphrey Jr. (May 27, 1911 – February 6, 1978) was an American pharmacist, politician, businessman and investor who developed his fortune with a series of lucrative and timely investments, and used it for a variety of charitable causes.


Born in Wallace, South Dakota, Humphrey attended the University of Minnesota. In 1943, he became a professor of political science at Macalester College and ran a failed campaign for mayor of Minneapolis. He helped found the Minnesota Democratic–Farmer–Labor Party (DFL) in 1944; the next year he was elected mayor of Minneapolis, serving until 1948 and successfully advocated for the inclusion of a proposal to end racial segregation in the 1948 Democratic National Convention's party platform.

Leaving public office, Humphrey embarked on what one economic historian described as “the greatest run of investments in the long history of Wall Street.” Humphrey turned his meager public salary and meager family money into a fortune by picking up and coming companies for heavy investment.

Humphrey’s runaway success attracted attention from the Securities and Exchange Commission, who probed what they saw as suspicious activity. However they were unable to ever produce any sort of evidence of wrongdoing, although Humphrey's famed predictive ability faltered as time went on.

Humphrey was criticized for his turn towards business life by many of his former allies, although others noted his increased wealth was not matched by a turn to the right. Humphrey donated large portions of his fortune to Civil Rights and other social causes, and always pushed for union recognition. Nonetheless he acknowledged the critics as having a point, although he explained himself only by saying that he was building a fortune “in case he needed it next time,” a cryptic statement that was never explained before his death from bladder cancer.
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Hubert Horatio Humphrey Jr. (May 27, 1911 – February 6, 1978) was an American pharmacist, politician, businessman and investor who developed his fortune with a series of lucrative and timely investments, and used it for a variety of charitable causes.


Born in Wallace, South Dakota, Humphrey attended the University of Minnesota. In 1943, he became a professor of political science at Macalester College and ran a failed campaign for mayor of Minneapolis. He helped found the Minnesota Democratic–Farmer–Labor Party (DFL) in 1944; the next year he was elected mayor of Minneapolis, serving until 1948 and successfully advocated for the inclusion of a proposal to end racial segregation in the 1948 Democratic National Convention's party platform.

Leaving public office, Humphrey embarked on what one economic historian described as “the greatest run of investments in the long history of Wall Street.” Humphrey turned his meager public salary and meager family money into a fortune by picking up and coming companies for heavy investment.

Humphrey’s runaway success attracted attention from the Securities and Exchange Commission, who probed what they saw as suspicious activity. However they were unable to ever produce any sort of evidence of wrongdoing, although Humphrey's famed predictive ability faltered as time went on.

Humphrey was criticized for his turn towards business life by many of his former allies, although others noted his increased wealth was not matched by a turn to the right. Humphrey donated large portions of his fortune to Civil Rights and other social causes, and always pushed for union recognition. Nonetheless he acknowledged the critics as having a point, although he explained himself only by saying that he was building a fortune “in case he needed it next time,” a cryptic statement that was never explained before his death from bladder cancer.
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in which Hubert Humphrey invents effective altruism
 
Light of the Nation - Part 15: Malaise and Morass

Jimmy Carter entered the White House on a wave of optimism that was high on hopes, but somewhat lacking in a unified vision for the future. Many of the Democratic wishlist items had been achieved under Mondale.

Carter’s moderation convinced swing vote Lewis F. Powell Jr. to retire. Carter, Southerner that he was, looked towards Alabama. Robert Smith Vance had sided with civil rights organizations, even serving as a leader of anti-Wallace Dems. Conservatives howled, and Vance’s nomination likely kept Berger on the Court. But Vance emerged as a liberal voice on the Court, which now had a solid bloc of liberals, including renewed attacks on the Death Penalty.

Carter’s executive approach was a much slimmer than Mondale’s, and he had a generally deregulatory approach to many industries. This was frustrating to many Democrats, but not to the point of open revolt. Many “Atari Democrats” like Hart were enthusiastic about this approach. Carter did have areas where he appealed to the Democratic base. His green policies were well received, like creating the Cabinet Department of the Environment. His administration also worked towards the Ottawa Agreement, aimed at closing the Ozone Hole.

Carter’s relationship with Congress could be rocky. The best example being his Education Bill. Carter aimed at no less than free college for all. But then came the Commitees and the costs and the lobbying and the messy messy compromise. The result was the Government Student Loan Association which provided subsidized loans backed by a majority stake of Government, with further private backing on its board. A complex series of formulas and forms were meant to ensure poorer students paid less. In practice Ginnie Sallie proved a mess. Bureaucracy made it difficult for the truly needy to get loans, while interest rates were high for middle income students. Student loan costs would continue to balloon, although so would college attendance.

This was also the heart of the tax and sagebrush rebellions. In the west, ranchers and farmers fought to wrest control, or at least use, of federal lands for themselves. Meanwhile voters turned out in droves to vote against every sort of tax they could find. Crime also remained a major issue. Carter’s “Just Don’t” campaign against Drugs was combined with harsher sentencing. But not as harsh as some had hoped. More rehabilitative programs floundered as Crime Crime Crime, became a standard GOP talking point.

These issues, plus general voter fatigue after a decade of Democrats in power, led to a harsh midterm backlash against Carter. Democrats lost the Senate, and while they held the House Conservatives had the majority. Carter’s next two years would be restrained by this. In 1987 the Government shutdown for a day as budget negotiations spiraled. It didn’t last long, but it highlighted an increasing partisanship and gridlock in Washington. Carter proved a target of constant attack from Conservatives.

Crime continued to be top issue in voter’s minds, while at the same time a decade of Big Government had led to…interesting perspectives from some quarters. Conspiracy theories, UFO sightings, and cults sprang up like mushrooms as a new counterculture emerged. Moral Panics also proved a danger. Satanism was alleged despite not actually being present, Communism as always was a common target. Meanwhile Government clinics working on AIDS research were accused of hosting unspeakable orgies. Things came to a head in Virginia, where Lyndon LaRouche and his followers turned an IRS raid into a month long siege of his compound. This proved especially damning for Illinois Democrats, who had wound up with deep ties to the movement.

So it was with a sense of unease, even trepidation the US approached 1988. Jimmy Carter had achievements yes, but did the age of heady Liberalism was coming to an end. People liked their prosperity, but didn’t want it “ruined” by crime or taxes.

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Light of the Nation - Part 16: Eyes of Texas

The great names of the Republican Party have fallen. John Connally, Ronald Reagan, Bob Dole, all the “future presidents” of the party have fallen short.

Who then is to deliver the party back to the White House?

Gordon Humphrey? A hard right Senator from New Hampshire. Tough on gays, tough on Abortion. A foot soldier of the evangelical cause, no doubt, and from New Hampshire, a critical state. But a small one, is must be said, and he would struggle with fundraising.

Lamar Alexander? Until very recently the Governor of Tennessee, and the South would be critical. An establishment Conservative, but hardly moderate. Suffered from a lack of name recognition, which could very well be a problem.

No Democrat had ever won without Texas. And Bill Clements had been the first Republican Governor there since Reconstruction. He’d made his fortune in oil and was appropriately Conservative. He had the business connections and cowboy swagger. But he was somewhat gaffe prone.

In the end it was that oil money that got Clements out to an early lead with an aggressive and effective ground game, plus blanketing the airwaves in Iowa and South Carolina (everyone agreed New Hampshire didn’t really count this year, ruining Humphrey’s plan). On the campaign trail Clements played up his outsider credentials. He was the businessman fed up with regulations, the westerner fed up with land use. And although perhaps not a pastor, he spoke to evangelicals at their level. What more could you want from a Republican?
Alexander and Humphrey struggled to ascend beyond regional candidates. Meanwhile Clements fought hard to keep his pole position, and was rewarded with the Republican nomination. A first for a former Confederate State. Clements pivoted to the center with his running mate, moderate Senator from Pennsylvania Arlen Specter. This made evangelicals…skittish. But Clements managed to assuage them mainly with Specter’s business credentials and background as a prosecutor.

So it was Clements/Specter vs Carter/Schroeder in 1988. Who would win? Who would lose? The only way to find out was forward.

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