Alternate Wikipedia Infoboxes VI (Do Not Post Current Politics or Political Figures Here)

Which is pretty much what France became in OTL after the collapse of its monarchy.

No? The 1st Republic was kind of a mess that changed so can't really be classified (however was something of a directorial republic), 2nd Republic was semi-presidential and presidential, the 3rd (and longest lasting) was parliamentary, 4th was also parliamentary while the 5th is semi-presidential.

That's half the republics that are parliamentary.
 
Infobox to come soon (hopefully)
(in the style of CBC election result pages)
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Hughes Beats Wilson: A Different 1916 and beyond
Chapter II: The President With Whiskers

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The 1920 Republican National Convention nominated President Charles Evans Hughes for President
and Governor Hiram Johnson for Vice President.

In 1920, America was still reeling from the end of a bloody World War I. President Charles Evans Hughes, a Republican, was credited for making peace in Europe.
However, Americans were deeply skeptical of applauding the American victory. They felt that they too much blood and money in WWI. Meanwhile, the nation was dealing with labor strikes and a staggering economy. Overseas there were wars and revolutions; at home there were strikes, riots and a growing fear of radicals and terrorists. Disillusionment was in the air. President Hughes had become increasingly unpopular. The economy was in a recession, the public was weary of war and reform, the Irish Catholic and German communities were outraged at his policies.

Following the return of former president Theodore Roosevelt to the Republican Party after the previous election, speculation quickly grew as to whether he would challenge Hughes for the Republican presidential nomination. Roosevelt's health declined seriously in 1918, however, and he died on January 6, 1919. There was some speculation that Hughes would not seek the nomination, but in early 1920, he announced he would accept the nomination. Vice President Charles W. Fairbanks died in 1918, and the delegates selected Hiram Johnson, the progressive Governor of California who was Theodore Roosevelt's running mate in 1912 and whose endorsement of Hughes in 1916 led to the Hughes's victory in the presidential election).

The Democratic National Convention nominated William McAdoo for President. McAdoo served as Secretary of the Treasury in the Wilson administration and was a leader of the Progressive movement. McAdoo voiced his support for such measures as injury compensation, unemployment insurance, and the eight-hour workday, while also expressing his support for the idea of permanent federal legislation in the labor sphere, especially concerning unemployment compensation and a minimum wage.
A committed Prohibition supporter, McAdoo's presidential bid was opposed by the New York state delegation and other Northern opponents of the banning of alcohol at the Democratic National Convention. Despite this, McAdoo easily won the nomination. The party selected Senator David I. Wash of Massachussetts to appease the North.

President Hughes and Secretary McAdoo made a whirlwind campaign that took them to rallies, train station speeches, and formal addresses, reaching audiences totalling a couple of millions. Mc Adoo's campaign spent some $4.1 million, nearly two times the money Hughes's campaign spent. McAdoo's campaign used national advertising in a major way. The theme was Harding's own progressive campaign.

On election night, November 2, 1920, commercial radio broadcast coverage of election returns for the first time. Announcers at KDKA-AM in Pittsburgh read telegraph ticker results over the air as they came in. This single station could be heard over most of the Eastern United States by the small percentage of the population that had radio receivers.

The total vote for 1920 was roughly 26,750,000, an increase of eight million from 1916. The great increase in the total number of votes is mainly attributable to the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which gave women the right to vote.

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Nearly two-thirds of the counties were carried by the Democrats. The distribution of the county vote accurately represents the overwhelming character of the majority vote. McAdoo received 54.1 percent of the total vote. The Republican share was 40.3 percent. The Republican Party was obviously still a significant opposition on national terms, even though Hughes won only four states.
 
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An infobox for Petsamo in the TL http://www.1940lafrancecontinue.org/ (France Fights On).

Germany postpones Operation Barbarossa until 1942 due to the Allied offensives in the Mediterranean. Hitler declares war on the US in 1941. The Finnish high command understands that Germany will lose the war and they refuse to participate in the invasion of the USSR. Finland remains neutral and keeps Petsamo, which becomes a corridor for trade with the outside world for both Finland and Sweden. In the postwar period, it becomes the country's window to the Arctic and an important port in the region.

@PauL62 pour la FTL ;)
 
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View attachment 594739

An infobox for Petsamo in the TL http://www.1940lafrancecontinue.org/ (France Fights On).

Germany postpones Operation Barbarossa until 1942 due to the Allied offensives in the Mediterranean. Hitler declares war on the US in 1941. The Finnish high command understands that Germany will lose the war and they refuse to participate in the invasion of the USSR. Finland remains neutral and keeps Petsamo, which becomes a corridor for trade with the outside world for both Finland and Sweden. In the postwar period, it becomes the country's window to the Arctic and an important port in the region.

@PauL62 pour la FTL ;)
Kaunista
 
Hughes Beats Wilson: A Different 1916 and beyond
Chapter II: The President With Whiskers

View attachment 594609
The 1920 Republican National Convention nominated President Charles Evans Hughes for President
and Governor Hiram Johnson for Vice President.

In 1920, America was still reeling from the end of a bloody World War I. President Charles Evans Hughes, a Republican, was credited for making peace in Europe.
However, Americans were deeply skeptical of applauding the American victory. They felt that they too much blood and money in WWI. Meanwhile, the nation was dealing with labor strikes and a staggering economy. Overseas there were wars and revolutions; at home there were strikes, riots and a growing fear of radicals and terrorists. Disillusionment was in the air. President Hughes had become increasingly unpopular. The economy was in a recession, the public was weary of war and reform, the Irish Catholic and German communities were outraged at his policies.

Following the return of former president Theodore Roosevelt to the Republican Party after the previous election, speculation quickly grew as to whether he would challenge Hughes for the Republican presidential nomination. Roosevelt's health declined seriously in 1918, however, and he died on January 6, 1919. There was some speculation that Hughes would not seek the nomination, but in early 1920, he announced he would accept the nomination. Vice President Charles W. Fairbanks died in 1918, and the delegates selected Hiram Johnson, the progressive Governor of California who was Theodore Roosevelt's running mate in 1912 and whose endorsement of Hughes in 1916 led to the Hughes's victory in the presidential election).

The Democratic National Convention nominated William McAdoo for President. McAdoo served as Secretary of the Treasury in the Wilson administration and was a leader of the Progressive movement. McAdoo voiced his support for such measures as injury compensation, unemployment insurance, and the eight-hour workday, while also expressing his support for the idea of permanent federal legislation in the labor sphere, especially concerning unemployment compensation and a minimum wage.
A committed Prohibition supporter, McAdoo's presidential bid was opposed by the New York state delegation and other Northern opponents of the banning of alcohol at the Democratic National Convention. Despite this, McAdoo easily won the nomination. The party selected Senator David I. Wash of Massachussetts to appease the North.

President Hughes and Secretary McAdoo made a whirlwind campaign that took them to rallies, train station speeches, and formal addresses, reaching audiences totalling a couple of millions. Mc Adoo's campaign spent some $4.1 million, nearly two times the money Hughes's campaign spent. McAdoo's campaign used national advertising in a major way. The theme was Harding's own progressive campaign.

On election night, November 2, 1920, commercial radio broadcast coverage of election returns for the first time. Announcers at KDKA-AM in Pittsburgh read telegraph ticker results over the air as they came in. This single station could be heard over most of the Eastern United States by the small percentage of the population that had radio receivers.

The total vote for 1920 was roughly 26,750,000, an increase of eight million from 1916. The great increase in the total number of votes is mainly attributable to the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which gave women the right to vote.

View attachment 594625

Nearly two-thirds of the counties were carried by the Democrats. The distribution of the county vote accurately represents the overwhelming character of the majority vote. McAdoo received 54.1 percent of the total vote. The Republican share was 40.3 percent. The Republican Party was obviously still a significant opposition on national terms, even though Hughes won only four states.

What four states did Hughes win in his 1920 landslide loss? I pretty sure Vermont would still vote for him but I'm not sure about the other three states.
 
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(Don't know who made the Poster but it certainly isn't me)
Cast :

Nikolaj Coster-Waldau as Joel Miller
Sadie Sink as Ellie
Rosario Dawson as Marlene
Carrie-Anne Moss as Tess
Josh Holloway as Tommy Miller
Lee Pace as David
Brandon Scott as Henry
Amandla Stenberg as Riley
Evan Alex as Sam
Ashley Scott as Maria
Derek Phillips as Dr Jerry Anderson

Episodes

1/ Outbreak Day

Guest Appearance: Julia Butters as Sarah Miller, Ashley Johnson as Ashley/Infected, Troy Baker as Bridge Soldier

Sarah Miller lives alone with her dad and has worked hard to offer him the best birthday gift she could, a watch. After falling asleep, she's awakened by her uncle calling her to get her dad. Waiting for him to return, she's seeing that her world is slowly turning to madness as the TV Shows report severals aggression across the country. She's forced to flee her home with her dad and Uncle after her neighbor try to kill her. The family flee on the roads until they crash in a town outside Austin where she broke her leg. Trying to get to the army, her uncle try to get them some times, they are shot and she dies in her father arms with her uncle saving her father.

2/ The Package
Guest Appearance : Laura Bailey as Infected Citizen
20 years after the Outbreak, Joel Miller is a broken man living from smuggling in the quarantine zone of Boston. Working with Tess, another smuggler, he's trying to regain his merchandise from another smuggler called Robert. They kill him after he reveal that he doesn't have it anymore. They save Marlene, the leader of a group called the Fireflies, and a girl named Ellie from the army and she reveals to them that she can give them anything they want if they get Ellie to a group of Fireflies outside of Boston at any cost.

3/ The Quest
Escaping from the army and Boston, Ellie is revealed to be infected and to protect herself from Joel, she reveals to the duo that she has been bitten three weeks before, she is immune and the Fireflies hope to make a vaccine thanks to her. Joel is skeptical but Tess is hopeful. They arrive to see that the Fireflies are dead and has to defend themselves from the infected. Joel wants to abandon the tasks but Tess force Joel to accept as a last favor to her, she has been bitten. Joel and Ellie leave to travel across the country to join Tommy in Jackson Wyoming as he might know where the Fireflies's lab is.

4/ Trapped City
Guest Appearance: W. Earl Brown as Bill

Joel wants to get a car from an old partner of him Bill but they encounter severals difficulties as Bill has wired and trapped the whole town. They must learn to trust the skills of the others to get to him. After that, Bill is revealed to be a somewhat older version of Joel, he has lost everything and doesn't want more human contact that could die later on. He give them a car and they leave. On the Road, Joel and Ellie share precious moments of bonding.

5/ Brothers

Driving into Pittsburg, they are ambushed by local bandits and ally themselves with two brothers, Henry and Sam, and each begin to friends with their equivalent (Joel to Henry and Ellie to Sam). After they escape from the city, Sam is bitten but hide it from the others. As the infection take hold, Sam attack Ellie and Henry is forced to kill him. Henry kill himself as he can't bear to have failed his brother.

6/ Jackson

Joel reminds himself of the last moments he saw his brother ten years ago. Tommy was being idealistic about his missions with the fireflies and Joel was cynical and openly called Tommy Stupid. After a small fight, they each goes their separate ways. In the present, Joel open himself to Ellie about his relationship with his brother. As they arrive near Jackson at a dam, they are ambushed by a group of Jacksonian lead by Maria and are saved by Tommy himself the now husband of Maria. After helping with the defense of the Dam, Joel convinces Tommy to take Ellie to the Fireflies. Ellie hearing that Joel wants to abandon her, flee Jackson forcing Tommy and Joel to look after her. After a confrontation in a nearby farm, where Ellie imagines herself in a world without a pandemic, Joel swear to stay with her, Tommy gives them the place where he was assigned as a Firefly and offer them a home when all's over.

7/ Broken Hope

As they look for the Fireflies laboratory, Ellie speaks about her infection and that she died with her best friends. Joel finally speaks about his daughter and all the bad things he had to do after the outbreak to survive. Finding no fireflies, they still manage to find a clue that their new HQ is at the Saint's Mary Hospital in Salt Lake City. As they leave, they are attacked, Joel is badly hurt and Ellie barely manage to escape with him and hide in the mountains.

8/ American Dreams

As she's looking over Joel, Ellie recalls the last day she had with her friend and where all began for her. She was in a military school in Boston and Riley ha disappeared only to return one night showing her new Firefly badge. They pass a night in an abandoned Mall where after making too much noise, they are bitten and decide to die together in a poetic manner. Yet Ellie doesn't turn and is saved by Marlene a friend of her mother and who's been watching over Ellie discreetly for years.

9/ Hunted
Guest Appearance: Nolan North as James

As she's looking for food in the snow, she encounters David and James and has to survive an horde with them. Despite a cordial exchange, David reveals that he is the leader of the group that attacked Joel and Ellie in the University and know that she's the one who murdered his crews. She manage to lead them away from Joel but is captured and refused to join their canibal group. Joel awakens and looks for Ellie, destroying David Group but find that Ellie has escaped and killed David.

10/ The Last of Us
Guest Appearance: Florence Pugh as Abby Anderson, Dacre Montgomery as Owen

Joel and Ellie reach Salt Lake but have difficulties reaching the hospital by the sewers. Ellie manages to saves Joel but nearly drown and Joel is assaulted and put unconscious by an unknown adversary
In a park of Salt Lake City, a teenage girl named Abby look for her father, and then both look for a zebra. After saving it, they are found by a teenage boy named Owen, in the same uniform as the one who arrested Joel and is revealed to be a firefly. The boy call Abby's Father Dr Anderson and inform him that "The Girl" has been found. Hurrying, Anderson does some test on a still unconcious Ellie and informs Marlene that they have the possibility to make a cure but that will kill Ellie. After some hesitation, Marlene gives her a blessing and goes informing Joel against Anderson's approval. After a heated exchange, Joel is thrown out of the Hospital and hesitates for a time before coming back saving Ellie. Anderson try to convince Joel but is killed and Joel leaves the Hospital, killing Marlene in the process. Abby finds her father and cry in the arms of Owen. Weeks Later, as they arrive in Jackson, Ellie make Joel swear that what he said about the fireflies was true, that they couldn't make a vaccine, and that her immunity meant nothing. He hesitates for a second before swearing. He leaves in the direction of the town but Ellie looks unsure of Joel words.


The Last of Us received widespread critical acclaim, especially Coster-Waldau performance, the Atmosphere, the Soundtrack and the Chemistry between the two leads. It received several awards including Outstanding Drama Series, Coster-Waldau for Best Actor in a Drama Series, Scott for Best Supporting Actor in a Drama Series and Neil Druckmann/Craig Mazin for Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series (Episode Brothers). In terms of public reviews, it has managed to win a 87% Metacritics Score and high-viewing ratings despite being a year after the end of another Pandemic (Covid-19), it has been compared to other "Dark" themed series since it's a hard universe with people saying that even when the duo is reunited and is looking to lives in Jackson, we still don't feel as if it's a full win with people calling the ending "Bittersweet".
 
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An answer to the oh-so-commonly-asked question of "what if the votes for Humphrey in the 1968 presidential election were multiplied by 1.05 in every state?"
Despite taking the popular vote lead by more than a million votes and picking up the states of Missouri and New Jersey compared to OTL, he still loses out to Nixon.
States decided by less than 1%
New Jersey, 0.067% - 17
(Decided by 1,949 votes.)
Ohio, 0.133% - 26
Alaska, 0.493% - 3
(Decided by just 418 votes! If just 209(+1?) Alaskans had chosen to instead vote for Humphrey, it would have deprived Nixon of his ≥270-EV majority.)
Illinois, 0.700% - 26
California, 0.830% - 40

States decided by between 1% and 5%
Missouri, 1.032%
Wisconsin, 1.378%
Delaware, 1.399%

Texas, 3.256%
Maryland, 3.743%

Oregon, 3.788%
Kentucky, 4.193%

Washington, 4.378%
 
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I have to wonder if there'll be any reviewers comparing it to Schindler's List? :openedeyewink: (Jokes aside, I'm curious what the critical consensus on this series would be if you've got any ideas on that front.)
I will write a critical response to it but well the Series isn't full of sunshines that's certain :p
 
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The 1955 British presidential election was the second election for the President of Britain, held on the 7th July, 1955. Since the incumbent President, Winston Churchill, was not running for a second term, the office-holder was to be the second President of Britain.

Like in 1950, Labour and the Tories held a vote among members of their parliamentary parties to select a leader. The Tories gave priority to the Cabinet’s vote, making the parliamentary party’s decision largely advisory. When, at that vote, Lord Salisbury asked the Cabinet to choose ‘Wab or Hawold’ for the Presidency, it was decided Wab- or, to give him his real name, Richard Austen ‘Rab’ Butler- should be moved from the Treasury to be put forward for President, not least because he and Prime Minister Anthony Eden did not get along particularly well and because Hawold- Foreign Secretary Harold Macmillan- was privately negotiating with Eden for Butler’s job.

Meanwhile, the tensions within Labour were flaring up again. The parliamentary party were the ones to decide on the nominee, with no prioritization to the Shadow Cabinet, though the nominee ultimately turned out to be Herbert Morrison, Labour’s deputy leader and one of Attlee’s main rivals within the party. While there was little evidence for it, Bevanites suspected the ballots had been rigged so Attlee could eject his main rival for the parliamentary leadership; in reality, Morrison’s campaign within the party had most likely succeeded due to his major role in the Festival of Britain, which he used to position himself as a man of the people (and, given his main contender was the by now rather listless Aneurin Bevan, he did not have to fight too hard for the support of the centre and right of the Labour Party in the first place).

For the second election in a row, the Liberal Party did not put forward a candidate for the Presidency; the only time since that the party has done this was in 1980. This time, the party uniformly threw its support behind Butler, as most of its left-wing members had joined Labour by this point.

While Morrison fought a tough campaign, at 67 he was significantly older and less energetic than Butler, and many Labour supporters who would have preferred a different nominee did not support him very eagerly. By contrast, most Tories, even those to his right, unified behind Butler fairly willingly, and ultimately he won with 54.7% of the vote to 44.4% for Morrison.

Having assumed the Presidency, Butler took a very different track to Churchill. Instead of being a rubber stamp to Eden as Churchill frequently had, he proved to be a major force of accountability. This came to a head during the Suez crisis, as he spoke up for having the matter referred to the UN instead of using force as Eden argued for. Once the British ceasefire and later withdrawal from the Canal Zone were declared, Butler put forth the addresses to the nation of such decisions rather than Eden, which strengthened his hand as someone the public felt to be honest, capable of addressing difficult subjects and at least somewhat independent from Parliament and party.

These three traits became ones referred to by his biographer, Anthony Howard, and later political theorists as ‘the British presidential triad’ or just ‘the triad’. During his first term, Butler also used his position to help encourage Macmillan, once he became Prime Minister in early 1957, to shepherd through well-received reforms such as the Betting & Gambling Act 1957 and the Street Offences Act 1958. In 1983, after Butler’s death, Macmillan finally admitted ‘Rab probably saved our government by becoming President- if it hadn’t been for how he handled Suez, we surely would have lost in 1958’ (the Tories ultimately won a small 24-seat majority over Hugh Gaitskell’s still-infighting Labour Party).

He further used his position to give assent to numerous extremely contentious social policies in place of the more conservative party rank-and-file and Home Secretary Selwyn Lloyd. He refused to reintroduce corporal punishment, in defiance of the recommendations of the Cadogan Report, establishing the precedent that the British President is the one who gives or refuses assent to the recommendations of parliamentary commissions rather than Parliament. This also allowed him to be the one to handle the extremely contentious Wolfenden Report in late 1957, very quickly giving assent to the crackdown on street prostitution to endear himself to the rank-and-file of the party, and once the 1958 election had been won by Macmillan, passing into law its recommendation to decriminalize homosexuality (though to alleviate public outcry, he bought with this extremely firm crackdowns on ‘promotion of the homosexual lifestyle and practices’ that would stay in place until the late 1960s and be reintroduced by laws repeatedly until the 2000s).

Other moves made to ensure he did not lose the right’s support by Butler included signing off on the execution of James Hanratty despite the (at the time) uncertain evidence, and helping lay out the provisions of the Homicide Act 1957 and its provisions for executions (not that this would last through the 1960s). While Churchill’s time as President has gone down as second fiddle to his legendary stint as Prime Minister during World War II, Butler is looked upon as the figure who showed how a British Presidency could work despite the long history of Britain as first and foremost a parliamentary system.

As a result, going into 1960, things looked good not just for Butler but for the Tories as a whole, particularly with Macmillan’s famous declaration that ‘many of our people have never had it so good’. And much as the 1960s are looked back on as a decade of great social unrest and change, they would start off on a very good note for Butler, Macmillan and their party…

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(results by county close-up)
 
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