Alternate Wikipedia Infoboxes VI (Do Not Post Current Politics or Political Figures Here)

A Path Less Travelled: Part Three
A Most Unexpected Nomination, A Most Unfortunate Fracture

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President Roosevelt intended to run again in 1920 and the Progressive Party intended to renominate him.

But Roosevelt's death in 1919 and now President Marshall's decision not to seek his own term in 1920 threw the floodgates wide open. The 1920 Progressive Primaries, the most expansive ones in the nation at this point, sent three frontrunners to the Progressive National Convention: Hiram Johnson of California, Roosevelt's original running-mate in 1912 and considered by many to be one of the father's of the party; Senator Albert J. Beveridge of Indiana, considered a philosophical leader of the Party who carried both legislative (albeit, very little) and executive (served as Governor of Indiana from 1913-1917) to the table; and, lastly, General Leonard Wood of New Hampshire, who surprised many by announcing his intention to run and surprised more by entering the Convention with the most primaries won. Though the Convention was intense and Johnson felt like he deserved the nomination, Wood ended up winning the nomination, many viewing him as the closest thing to Roosevelt and his ideals the Party could put forward. Wood was paired with progressive favorite Senator George Norris to beef up the ticket's commitment to progressivism.

The Republican Party, already bloody from the civil war that led to the rise of the Progressives and the expulsion of many a member, cemented their position as the business oriented, establishment ticket. Though their numbers had decreased in the preceding years, a handful of influential figures that still held government fought for the nomination. The balloting continued until finally, Joseph S. Frelinghuysen Sr. of New Jersey, a party standard bearer from its northeast base was agreed upon. However, when the Convention named Massachusetts Governor Calvin Coolidge, party members left outside of the northeast wondered just how the hell the GOP intended to survive as a national institution with tickets like these.

Maybe their hopes were lifted when the Democratic Tear of 1920 occurred that summer. The Democratic Party found itself at a cross-roads. Some felt the failure of the Saulsbury campaign in 1916 proved that the party needed to make a push for the reformist and progressives that had left the party or were on the fence, and bank on the weakened GOP opening avenues elsewhere. The Old Guard of the Party, however, had grown incensed with the Progressive Agenda of the last four years enacted by Roosevelt and his party in the legislature. They felt that the real appeal lay in shoring up conservative support and bringing in dissatisfied Republicans by convincing them their party was dead in the water. The fight on whether to appeal to the reformists or the limited government types caused an intense fight for the nomination that only ended after over 100 ballots with the selection of Robert Latham Owen of Oklahoma. Owen was considered progressive enough, but promised not to abandon the factions of his party. But for his running-mate, Democrats from across the country outside of the south and pockets of the eastern seaboard succeeded in getting Lawrence Tyson the nomination. Their hope was to counter Wood's military appeal with some military appeal of their own. This wasn't what the Old Guard wanted at all. In Owen, they saw an abdication, in the failure to name a conservative as running-mate, they saw an all out rejection.

So they left and nominated Senator Carter Glass, paired him with Blair Lee I, and caused a fracture in the Democratic vote. Calling themselves the Conservative Democrats, they launched a campaign nearly nationwide hoping to appeal to disaffected, conservative Republicans, though their reach didn't extend far past the South. To many, they were just a front for Southern Elites.

And to the Progressives, they were a godsend. Leonard Wood would end up winning the election, taking 35 states and a plurality of the popular vote. Frelinghuysen was seen as a lackluster candidate and his 20.4% showing would be the worst by a Republican in the party's history. Though he received the third most votes, behind Wood and the official Democratic ticket led by Owen, he received the least electoral votes. Glass got the least votes, but was able to win key states in the South that ended up amounting to a third place finish in the electoral college. Progressive's saw successes down ballot emulating Wood (and sometimes surpassing him in places where Wood's progressive credentials were questioned). Though Wood led his next closest rival by an over 10% margin and over 100 electoral votes, the election was nearly hung and sent to Congress - Wood carried the State of New York and its 45 electors by 31.4% of the vote to Frelinghuysen's 30.7%. Had he lost the state, he would have won only 250 electoral votes, 16 less than the 266 necessary to win outright.
–•–

APLT - Index
Part I. 1912 U.S. presidential election
Part II. 1916 U.S. presidential election
 
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The United Kingdom and Empire of Great Britain, Ireland, North America, South Africa and Australia is a constitutional monarchy that is, along with the other states of the Crown of Windsor, the hegemonic superpower of the solar system. Nominally a multi-party democracy, British politics has been dominated by the Imperial Social Credit Movement since the 1940s, only having been out of power for short periods in the early 1980s, mid 1990s and the early 2010s. The party has a strong national conservative and traditionalist tradition (and an on-again, off-again streak of anti-Semitism) that has accomplished its one primary goal a long time ago, and has managed to hold onto power due to limited franchise, a fawning media and a fairly incompetent and incoherent opposition that is frequently fractured due to petty infighting. The Socreds have established a welfare state based entirely around a universal income. Every British citizen receives a set monthly stipend from the government as the only form of government welfare, though children, the elderly and the disabled can receive additional cash. A revolving door of politicians and senior civil servants into executive positions has lead to a significant degree of regulatory capture. The average Socred Prime Minister has an average tenure of only approximately 20 months, and are frequently changed in and out due to shifting coalitions within the party. Important decisions are generally made by the cabinet and the party leadership.

Current Prime Minister is 73 year old Jeremy Cosgrove who was first elected to Parliament in 1977 and has been in and out of the Cabinet since 1995. He was elected leader of the Social Credit Movement on 8 April 2018, succeeding Prime Minister Michael Martin who had only been in 10 Downing Street since January 2017. Martin was forced out by a coalition of Californian and Oregonian Socred MPs who were disatisifed by the Prime Minister's handling of wildfires and flooding along the American West Coast. Cosgrove inherited an economy that was chugging along at a fairly unremarkable though not bad rate and a government that was beset by the same old corruption scandals. The loss of a whole British battalion on Ceres was unexpected and a major blow to the Cosgrove ministry, but reinforcements and a bloody suppression of that native revolt set things right.

The Socreds' main opposition in the 21st century is the Democratic Party, a loose collection of centrists, liberals, conservatives and Socreds dissatisfied by the current Prime Minister. They are joined by the New Liberals in 2016, which was founded as a merger of various liberal, social democratic, progressive and regionalist parties and individuals into a single, unified party that shared a lot of the same policy goals as the Democratic Party, but strongly opposed any expansion of welfare or the tax code as a sign of government overreach. The rise of the New Liberals harmed both the centre-left Labour Co-op and the Regional Congress, which is a loose coalition of nationalist and autonomous parties such as the Irish, Scots, Quebecois, First Nations, Australians, Maori, Afrikaaners and Pacific libertarians. Britannia First is a far-right populist and nationalist party which frequently gives Socred governments confidence and supply, and is currently led by the reactionary Marquess of Westminster from the House of Lords. The Federation of Communist Parties of Britain is a far-left communist party that has been unbanned by the authorities since 2001, primarily because the Labour Co-op and mainstream trade unions were suffering from militant entryism from subversive radicals, while the Green Committees of Correspondence entered Parliament for the first time electing four MPs, all from California or Oregon.

The 2019 general election was a relatively mundane and predictable affair. The Socreds lost a few seats but still retained a significant majority in the Commons. The Democrats and New Liberals both made large gains, though unfortunately, Democratic leader Megan Roberts lost her seat in a stunning upset to the Britannia First candidate. Jeremy Cosgrove would serve as Prime Minister until May 2020 when he stepped down following the failure of three consecutive Supreme Court nominees nominated by his Justice Secretary.



President Anna Napier and Vice President Calvin Rucker
 
List of First Ministers of the Commonwealth of Columbia

The title of First Minister in the Commonwealth of Columbia is generally given to the leader of the majority party, or to the leader of the largest party in a coalition. There are 15 First Ministers: the Prime Minister of the Commonwealth and the fourteen provincial Premiers. The Prime Minister is formally appointed by the Sovereign, either after a general election or following the resignation of an incumbent Prime Minister. The Premiers, meanwhile, are formally appointed by the Provincial Governors, who serve as ceremonial executives and representatives of the Sovereign.

The incumbent Prime Minister is Sir Joe Biden of the Progressive-Farmer-Labour Party, who leads a grand coalition together with the Liberal Democratic Party, the Progressive Conservatives, the Agrarian Progressive Party, and Solidarity & Justice. The Progressive-Farmer-Labour Party holds seven of the fourteen premierships, the Democratic People's Party holds four, the Progressive Conservatives hold two, and the Liberal Democrats hold one. Following the most recent elections, just three Premiers, Jack Harris, Luther Strange, and the Viscount Madigan, command electoral majorities.


Previous posts in the American Monarchy series:

The Second Biden Ministry (2018) (List)
Prime Ministers of the Commonwealth of Columbia, 1960-
The First Biden Ministry (1992) (List)
The Second Biden Ministry (2018) (Wikibox)
1990 Democratic Republican Coalition leadership election, seat 1 (Wikibox)
List of Presidents of the Federal Republic of California, 1960-present (Wikibox)
The First Biden Ministry (1992) (Wikibox)
2014 Lord Speaker election (Wikibox)
 
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These infoboxes are a strange "what if?" of mine. In this scenario, along with officially bringing Ireland into the Union in 1801, King George III also decided to bring the Electorate of Hanover into the kingdom. This creates the new United Kingdom of Great Britain, Hanover, and Ireland, which spans three monarchs (King George III (1801-1820), King George IV (1820-1830), and King William IV (1830-1837)) and 36 years.

Following the death of King William IV in 1837, Queen Victoria becomes the new queen. However, with Hanover having semi-Salic law, which prevented females from inheriting the Hanoverian throne while a dynastic male was still alive. As a result, Victoria's uncle (and George IV and William IV's younger brother) Ernest Augustus became the new king of a new separated Kingdom of Hanover while Victoria would become the new Queen of the new United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.
 
I don't think Hanover could secede using Salic law as an excuse after an Act of Union.

OTL it was just a personal union so different succession laws made it end quite normally. However in this ATL it would be a real political union. In which case Hanover would have to follow same succession law as the Britain.
Don't think it works. It would be very interesting to see integrated into the UK Hanover in the Spring of Nations and later in the era of German Unification.
 
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Here's my first attempt at posting an infobox here. It's a simple ideology infobox, and in particular it roughly corresponds to my own political views. It's nothing too extraordinary - a generic conservative ideology with some center-left tendencies in regards to economics, the environment, and social justice issues - but I thought it would be a good way to test out making wikiboxes in the future.
 
I don't think Hanover could secede using Salic law as an excuse after an Act of Union.

OTL it was just a personal union so different succession laws made it end quite normally. However in this ATL it would be a real political union. In which case Hanover would have to follow same succession law as the Britain.
Don't think it works. It would be very interesting to see integrated into the UK Hanover in the Spring of Nations and later in the era of German Unification.
The two infoboxes were just a fun but weird idea I've had in my head for a while, so don't take them too seriously my friend.

I do agree with you though on how a United Kingdom of Great Britain, Hanover and Ireland would fair in world affairs'. Would would the Napoleonic Wars look like and what's gonna happen when Napoleon and the First French Empire try to invade and annex Hanover into the French client state of the Confederation of the Rhine? What's gonna happen once German unification starts up decades later?
 
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Here's my first attempt at posting an infobox here. It's a simple ideology infobox, and in particular it roughly corresponds to my own political views. It's nothing too extraordinary - a generic conservative ideology with some center-left tendencies in regards to economics, the environment, and social justice issues - but I thought it would be a good way to test out making wikiboxes in the future.
I am a fan of idelogical developments in AH 🤔
 
The United Kingdom and Empire of Great Britain, Ireland, North America, South Africa and Australia is a constitutional monarchy that is, along with the other states of the Crown of Windsor, the hegemonic superpower of the solar system. Nominally a multi-party democracy, British politics has been dominated by the Imperial Social Credit Movement since the 1940s, only having been out of power for short periods in the early 1980s, mid 1990s and the early 2010s. The party has a strong national conservative and traditionalist tradition (and an on-again, off-again streak of anti-Semitism) that has accomplished its one primary goal a long time ago, and has managed to hold onto power due to limited franchise, a fawning media and a fairly incompetent and incoherent opposition that is frequently fractured due to petty infighting. The Socreds have established a welfare state based entirely around a universal income. Every British citizen receives a set monthly stipend from the government as the only form of government welfare, though children, the elderly and the disabled can receive additional cash. A revolving door of politicians and senior civil servants into executive positions has lead to a significant degree of regulatory capture. The average Socred Prime Minister has an average tenure of only approximately 20 months, and are frequently changed in and out due to shifting coalitions within the party. Important decisions are generally made by the cabinet and the party leadership.
So, OTL Japan, basically?
 
@Nofix what have you started?

A Path Less Travelled: Part IV
The Birth of a New Party System


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Leonard Wood was easily renominated by the Progressive Party, who had become national favorites for the time being. In the preceding three years, Wood had emphasized his progressive positions and new nationalism perhaps even more effectively than Roosevelt had. The party had overseen the passage of amendments granting women the right to vote (Amendment XIX), instating prohibition (Amendment XX) and perhaps most importantly, setting the nation Election Day to the first Saturday in November and making it a federal holiday (Amendment XXI).

In the preceding four years, the old titans of the Republican Party and the Democratic Party died. The Democratic Tear of 1920 was permanent, and the result was the escape of essentially the non-southern Democrats. They would end up joining with the remaining Republicans, and a rebrand was done - this new, fusion party dubbed itself the American Liberal Party, in the hopes of reviving the liberal brand. The Conservative Democrats stuck to the name they took in 1920 and contested the election once more, but nominated increasingly unpopular Texas Governor Joseph Bailey, whose positions against women's suffrage hurt the candidate. The American Liberals nominated former Republican Frank Lowden of Illinois and former Democrat Al Smith of New York.

But neither was a match for Wood and the Progressive machine. The Conservative Dems were viewed as a vehicle for the South and the South alone (emphasized by their entirely Southern ticket) and had nominated a man not very effective as a candidate to boot. And the American Liberals were simply too new, too chaotic still in unifying the discontent former Republican and Democrats to match the now established Progressive machinery. Progressive dominance seems to have been secured, at least for now.

Turnout soured on the first held, federally mandated and protect, weekend Election Day. Wood took 350 electoral electoral votes in what turned out to be a landslide even the most supportive Progressives did not expect - victories in Florida, Georgia and Alabama in particular came as a shock to experts.
–•–

APLT - Index
Part I. 1912 U.S. presidential election
Part II. 1916 U.S. presidential election
Part III. 1920 U.S. presidential election
 
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The House would probably elect Clark given the results of the 1912 Congressional elections and having the mandate of both electoral and popular pluralities.
 
The House would probably elect Clark given the results of the 1912 Congressional elections and having the mandate of both electoral and popular pluralities.
Both a progressive Democrat and Republican revolt and a close election I can see it going either way really, just Teddy convinced Republicans to back him and many progressive democrats in republican and progressive won states back the progressives instead. I dont see the pluralities meaning much when in 1824 Jackson won against Adams by 10% more of the popular vote and still lost the contingent.
 
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