Alternate Wikipedia Infoboxes VI (Do Not Post Current Politics or Political Figures Here)

You know what forget this thread you guys seem more interested in politics then pop culture goodbye forever
This is just childish. The people here who make wikiboxes make stuff that interests them individually. Heck, that's how this entire site works. All timelines, maps, wikiboxes, and lists are made because that person, not someone else is interested in that topic. If people wrote stuff other people like but not what they liked then well, we wouldn't have a lot of long running, excellent timelines here. The best timelines always have an incredible amount of passion behind it that drives the author to make it better and research it too often impressive degrees. For example, if I wrote a timeline about the Hundred Year War, it'd be terrible. I wouldn't have the motivation to write an interesting story or properly research it.

My basic point is, no one here is obligated to make what you like in the same way you're not obligated to make things other people like.
 
Something I've been working on again, off again for quite a while now, and have only just managed to get out some draft results. There is a site that has an Ideological Matrix for each member of Congress throughout History, and I have always been interested in using that Matrix to draw up what I would consider to be an effective mapping of the United States into a Parliamentary System. What makes this Matrix so unique though is that while it does assign a score to a Congressman based on their lifetime Congressional Record, it also does so based on their Record for each individual Congress, meaning that they can hold membership in multiple different factions over the course of their service. For the purposes of the Draft however I ended up copying them to the Dutch System where the number of seats is equivalent to the number of votes received; I wasn't sure how best to account for the votes in an FPTP setup, and while I originally wanted to use D'Hondte instead of strict proportional, I wasn't sure how to reverse discover the number of votes needed for each result. Still, I thought that the seat arrangements would at least be of interest by showing the size and influence of certain factions within either the Republican or Democratic Parties, provided you are able to identify which is which. I had intended to use actual Congressmen as the leaders of the Parties to give a more general idea of who might be in them but, as Congressmen can flit between the different factions over the years quite radically, it didn't seem feasible.
I'd be happy to answer any and all questions on the below anyone might have. I intend to go to 2018 at least, and from there I may opt to go backwards from '74.
Edit: I've only just realized that I had forgotten to trim the "special elections" from the results of about four tables I had, meaning there are more than (435) seats in those particular results. I'll leave these up for now, but I'll replace them in a new expansive post which will also include Senate Elections.
Party Leanings
  • Democratic Alliance
    • Social Democratic: Economically Liberal, Socially Liberal
    • Farmer-Labor: Economically Liberal, Socially Centrist
    • National: Economically Liberal, Socially Conservative
    • Citizen's: Economically Centrist, Socially Liberal
    • Democratic: Economically Centrist, Socially Centrist
    • Christian Democratic: Economically Centrist, Socially Conservative
    • Jeffersonian: Economically Conservative, Socially Conservative
  • Republican Alliance
    • Constitutionalist: Economically Conservative, Socially Conservative
    • Republican: Economically Conservative, Socially Centrist
    • Liberty: Economically Conservative, Socially Liberal
    • United America: Economically Centrist, Socially Conservative
    • Liberal: Economically Centrist, Socially Centrist
    • Independence: Economically Centrist, Socially Liberal
SmkiPpv.png
 
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Something I've been working on again, off again for quite a while now, and have only just managed to get out some draft results. There is a site that has an Ideological Matrix for each member of Congress throughout History, and I have always been interested in using that Matrix to draw up what I would consider to be an effective mapping of the United States into a Parliamentary System. What makes this Matrix so unique though is that while it does assign a score to a Congressman based on their lifetime Congressional Record, it also does so based on their Record for each individual Congress, meaning that they can hold membership in multiple different factions over the course of their service. For the purposes of the Draft however I ended up copying them to the Dutch System where the number of seats is equivalent to the number of votes received; I wasn't sure how best to account for the votes in an FPTP setup, and while I originally wanted to use D'Hondte instead of strict proportional, I wasn't sure how to reverse discover the number of votes needed for each result. Still, I thought that the seat arrangements would at least be of interest by showing the size and influence of certain factions within either the Republican or Democratic Parties, provided you are able to identify which is which. I had intended to use actual Congressmen as the leaders of the Parties to give a more general idea of who might be in them but, as Congressmen can flit between the different factions over the years quite radically, it didn't seem feasible.
I'd be happy to answer any and all questions on the below anyone might have. I intend to go to 2018 at least, and from there I may opt to go backwards from '74.
ebOU3ut.png
Nice party system, but I think the box would be more relatable if you used OTL figures to sort give some more context. Fantastic work though, I like the boxes a lot!
 
Nice party system, but I think the box would be more relatable if you used OTL figures to sort give some more context. Fantastic work though, I like the boxes a lot!
Again I really did, but quite a few of them jump between factions over the years. To give an example, within that decade, Tip O'Neill had from being Farmer-Labor ('75-'77) to Social Democratic ('77-79), back to Farmer-Labor ('79-'83), back to Social Democratic ('83-85), back to Farmer-Labor ('85-'87). It felt strange for his and others affiliations to change like that constantly, hence why I opted for fictitious personalities.
 
Banat People's Republic
Following up on this, here's the Banat Republic.

____________________

Banat, officially the Banat Republic, is a landlocked country in Central Europe. Spanning 27,104 square kilometers (10,465 sq mi) of the Carpathian Basin, it is bordered by Hungary to the north, Romania to the east, and Serbia to the west. Banat has a population of over 3.3 million, mostly comprised of ethnic Romanians, Germans, Serbs, and Hungarians. Hungarian, Romanian, Serbian, and German are the four official languages, with Hungarian considered to be the country's lingua franca. Temesvar is the country's capital and largest city; other major urban areas include Lugos and Nagybecskerek. Banat is administratively divided into three counties.

Until the 20th century, different states at various times controlled the lands of modern-day Banat, including the
First Bulgarian Empire, the Kingdom of Hungary, and the Ottoman Empire. The region later became a province of the Habsburg Monarchy, and under the reign of Maria Theresa, it was colonized by German settlers. Following the Austro-Hungarian Compromise of 1867, the territory returned to Hungarian administration. The First Banat Republic was declared on 31 October 1918 after the collapse of Austro-Hungarian rule. It gained the support of the First Hungarian Republic to resist annexation efforts by the Kingdom of Serbia and the Kingdom of Romania, and it was able to successfully quell internal secessionist movements aiming for the division of the republic. During World War II, Banat was occupied by Axis forces and saw the establishment of a puppet state under the leadership of Josef Lapp. The end of the war resulted in the country's occupation by Soviet troops and the formation of the Warsaw Pact member Banat People's Republic. In the wake of the Revolutions of 1989, the communist government was dissolved, and the current Second Banat Republic was established.

Banat is a unitary parliamentary directorial republic with a unicameral legislature and a four-member presidency made up of one member from each of the four major ethnic groups. It is a developing country with an upper-middle income economy supported by the services, agricultural, and manufacturing sectors. The country is a member of the United Nations, the European Union, and NATO, and it is known for its diverse population and sites of cultural and historical importance.

Banat Republic.png

____________________

A few notes:
  • The scenario is a bit light on pre-Cold War history currently, but I'm hoping to delve into that more​
  • I haven't made an infobox before with the GDP of an imaginary country included, so those numbers might be off from what a reasonable estimate would be​
  • Once again, apologies for any possible translation mishaps that may appear​
 
This is just childish. The people here who make wikiboxes make stuff that interests them individually. Heck, that's how this entire site works. All timelines, maps, wikiboxes, and lists are made because that person, not someone else is interested in that topic. If people wrote stuff other people like but not what they liked then well, we wouldn't have a lot of long running, excellent timelines here. The best timelines always have an incredible amount of passion behind it that drives the author to make it better and research it too often impressive degrees. For example, if I wrote a timeline about the Hundred Year War, it'd be terrible. I wouldn't have the motivation to write an interesting story or properly research it.

My basic point is, no one here is obligated to make what you like in the same way you're not obligated to make things other people like.
I couldn't have answered it better myself, @ZeroFrame

I honestly don't get it though. Why couldn't kirbopher15 simply make his own infoboxes that he wanted instead of telling other user to do so? Several other users (including myself) told him that if he wanted infoboxes about X-Men 4 this and Dan Aykroyd that, he can make them himself instead of demanding other users to do it every 5 goddamn minutes! Iguess he chooses not to read our comments.

To be fair, though, he did stop for a while, but then recently started doing it again. Of course, I'm not trying to be a jerk, but I'm just worried that if he keeps it up, he might get kicked again or possibly banned for his behavior.
 
Edward IV, The Christian Lion.png

Edward IV (October 13, 1453-October 9, 1522) was King of England from October 4th, 1454 to his death on October 9th, 1522. He was a central figure in the Wars of the Roses, a series of civil wars in England fought between the Yorkist and Lancastrian factions between 1454 and 1461. He, unlike his father, was a great warrior and took back a large part of northern France during the Seven-Years War. Edward died two years after his son and so was succeeded by his grandson, Henry VII.
Have a wikibox!
 
During the past week the President had ordered the the reduction of American personnel in the United States mission in Japan, to levels that could be safely evacuated in the during an emergency, while enabling that mission to continue to fulfill its duties. During the day on Monday, Washington Time the airport in Tokyo came under persistent rocket as well as artillery fire and was effectively closed. The military situation in the area deteriorated rapidly. The President, therefore, ordered the evacuation of all remaining American personnel in Japan.
- Secretary of State Dean Rusk
[1]

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Americans have always taken casualties very seriously. When the number of casualties is too high, public opinion will boil up and condemn an operation as a failure, even if we get the upper hand militarily. Kuribayashi had lived in America. He knew our national character. That's why he deliberately chose to fight in a way that would relentlessly drive up the number of casualties. I think he knew American public opinion would shift toward wanting to bring the occupation of Japan to an eventual end.
- Historian James Bradley
[2]
1652659707925.png

The occupation situation has developed not necessarily to America's advantage, while the general trends of the world have all turned against its interest.
- President John F. Kennedy
[3]
1652660136378.png
------------------------------------
Any similarities with real life events are pure coincidence.
The speeches are slightly altered versions of
[1] Ron Nessen (Press Sec. for Gerald Ford) on the Fall of Saigon; [2] James Bradley quote on the defense of Iwo Jima; [3] Hirohito's surrender speech.
 
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I wasn't sure how best to account for the votes in an FPTP setup, and while I originally wanted to use D'Hondte instead of strict proportional, I wasn't sure how to [/FONT]reverse discover the number of votes needed for each result.

To come up with popular vote percentages that will lead to a given seat distribution under D'Hondt apportionment, increase each party's seat count by whatever number you want between 0 and 1, then divide the resulting values by their total.
 
During the past week the President had ordered the the reduction of American personnel in the United States mission in Japan, to levels that could be safely evacuated in the during an emergency, while enabling that mission to continue to fulfill its duties. During the day on Monday, Washington Time the airport in Tokyo came under persistent rocket as well as artillery fire and was effectively closed. The military situation in the area deteriorated rapidly. The President, therefore, ordered the evacuation of all remaining American personnel in Japan.
- Secretary of State Dean Rusk
[1]

View attachment 742034
View attachment 742035
Americans have always taken casualties very seriously. When the number of casualties is too high, public opinion will boil up and condemn an operation as a failure, even if we get the upper hand militarily. Kuribayashi had lived in America. He knew our national character. That's why he deliberately chose to fight in a way that would relentlessly drive up the number of casualties. I think he knew American public opinion would shift toward wanting to bring the occupation of Japan to an eventual end.
- Historian James Bradley
[2]
View attachment 742040
The occupation situation has developed not necessarily to America's advantage, while the general trends of the world have all turned against its interest.
- President John F. Kennedy
[3]
View attachment 742044
------------------------------------
Any similarities with real life events are pure coincidence.
The speeches are slightly altered versions of
[1] Ron Nessen (Press Sec. for Gerald Ford) on the Fall of Saigon; [2] James Bradley quote on the defense of Iwo Jima; [3] Hirohito's surrender speech.
What happened to North Japan which possibly under the Soviet influence? What happened to Shinkansen?
 
What happened to North Japan which possibly under the Soviet influence? What happened to Shinkansen?
The Democratic Republic of Japan (Hokkaido), the People's Republic of Korea and the Soviet Socialist Republic of Manchuria are all quite quite close, politically. The DRJ was fairly insulated from the Imperial Uprising, as the strait of Hokkaido is mined to hell.
You know what, no. I'm not falling for the temptation that is Communist Hokkaido (why is it so sexy!?). I'm going with my initial idea for the scenario. The entirety of the Japanese Archipelago was nominally part of the American backed Republic of Japan. The Soviets, however, were able to install the People's Republic of Korea and the Soviet Socialist Republic of Manchuria, and both are very closely aligned to the USSR.

The Shinkansen never developed in this timeline, as the Republic of Japan is far poorer than OTL Japan. Most money went to reconstruction following Operation Downfall and the constant guerrilla fighting made railway development deeper inland problematic to say the least.
 
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You know what, no. I'm falling for the temptation that is Communist Hokkaido (why is it so sexy!?). I'm going with my initial idea for the scenario. The entirety of the Japanese Archipelago was nominally part of the American backed Republic of Japan. The Soviets, however, were able to install the People's Republic of Korea and the Soviet Socialist Republic of Manchuria, and both are very closely aligned to the USSR.

The Shinkansen never developed in this timeline, as the Republic of Japan is far poorer than OTL Japan. Most money went to reconstruction following Operation Downfall and the constant guerrilla fighting made railway development deeper inland problematic to say the least.
What would be? Is it in the USA or UK or France where the country will build the world’s first high speed rail?

What about the Philippines? What would Tokyo/Edo look like today?
 
What would be? Is it in the USA or UK or France where the country will build the world’s first high speed rail?

What about the Philippines? What would Tokyo/Edo look like today?
Probably the UK or France, and probably in the 70s instead of 60s, as the Marshall Plan was far smaller ITTL (as the US concentrated more in East Asia).

The Philippines are relatively similar to OTL, but certainly more militarized, considering the status of Japan since 67.

The Second Imperial Restoration moved the capital back to Kyoto, and Tokyo was renamed Edo in an move to harken back to a time when Kyoto still held the most cultural significance. Edo has been considerably de-westernized, as the New Imperial State values a much more tradition pre-Meiji culture (ironic). This is not to say that this new Imperial State is a bunch of luddites. Most factories and manufactories were probably reutilize to serve the Imperial State. The concrete apartment complexes that are so emblematic of the Tokyo we know are not long for this world. In another touch of irony, the Daijo (Chancellor) in Kyoto operates essentially like a Shogun, as the all-powerful Imperial figure is simply a figurehead.
 
Probably the UK or France, and probably in the 70s instead of 60s, as the Marshall Plan was far smaller ITTL (as the US concentrated more in East Asia).

The Philippines are relatively similar to OTL, but certainly more militarized, considering the status of Japan since 67.

The Second Imperial Restoration moved the capital back to Kyoto, and Tokyo was renamed Edo in an move to harken back to a time when Kyoto still held the most cultural significance. Edo has been considerably de-westernized, as the New Imperial State values a much more tradition pre-Meiji culture (ironic). This is not to say that this new Imperial State is a bunch of luddites. Most factories and manufactories were probably reutilize to serve the Imperial State. The concrete apartment complexes that are so emblematic of the Tokyo we know are not long for this world. In another touch of irony, the Daijo (Chancellor) in Kyoto operates essentially like a Shogun, as the all-powerful Imperial figure is simply a figurehead.
What happened to Tokyo Tower?

Which Asian countries that could pull like OTL Japan where exports could be a greater financial value and standards of living will go up?

What happened to Germany?

What will the fate of the Japanese Imperial family be? What happened to Kurosawa? Is he fled to the United States or not?
 
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A long wiki box, but a scene setter to a Scottish-based timeline I've been playing about with for a while. Since it's explaining the current setup of the TL decided to make it a long (and hopefully interesting) box. I've got ideas for it, so hopefully will expand on it in times to come. Enjoy.

This is amazing! I can't wait to see more from you!
 
Well, it's been a little over two weeks since I've made one of these. Time to make it up to you good people and having two Guns of the South infoboxes for the price of one.

Page 38: The 1867 Confederate States presidential election
* Page 307: The 1867 Confederate States presidential election in South Carolina
* Page 310: The 1867 Confederate States presidential election in Alabama
* Page 311: The 1867 Confederate States presidential election in Arkansas
* Page 312: The 1867 Confederate States presidential election in Florida
* Page 314: The 1867 Confederate States presidential election in Georgia
* Page 315: The 1867 Confederate States presidential election in Kentucky
* Page 316: The 1867 Confederate States presidential election in Louisiana
* Page 317; The 1867 Confederate States presidential election in Mississippi
* Page 319: The 1867 Confederate States presidential election in North Carolina
* Page 319: The 1867 Confederate States presidential election in Tennessee
* Page 320: The 1867 Confederate States presidential election in Texas
* Page 320: The 1867 Confederate States presidential election in Virginia
* Page 330: The 1867 Confederate States presidential election table
Page 39: The 1864 United States presidential election
* Page 321: The 1864 United States presidential election in Vermont
* Page 324: The 1864 United States presidential election in New Hampshire
* Page 325: The 1864 United States presidential election in Maine
* Page 325: The 1864 United States presidential election in Massachusetts
* Page 326: The 1864 United States presidential election in Rhode Island
* Page 328: The 1864 United States presidential election in Connecticut
* Page 331: The 1864 United States presidential election in New York
* Page 336: The 1864 United States presidential elections in both New Jersey and Delaware (you are here)

The 1864 United States presidential election in New Jersey in Harry Turtledove's The Guns of the South

1864USAGOTSNJ1.png

1864USAGOTSNJ2.png

The 1864 United States presidential election in New Jersey took place on November 8, 1864, as part of the 1864 United States presidential election. Voters chose seven representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

New Jersey voted for the Independent candidate, former Major General George B. McClellan over the three other candidates, Democratic candidate, Horatio Seymour, incumbent Republican President Abraham Lincoln and Radical Republican candidate John C. Frémont.

McClellan won the Garden State by a narrow margin of 1.5%.

New Jersey was George McClellan's home state, though he was born in neighboring Pennsylvania. The state was also one of the only two states to be won by him, the other being neighboring Delaware.


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The 1864 United States presidential election in Delaware in Harry Turtledove's The Guns of the South

1864USAGOTSDE1.png

1864USAGOTSDE2.png



The 1864 United States presidential election in Delaware took place on November 8, 1864, as part of the 1864 United States presidential election. Voters chose three representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Delaware voted for the Independent candidate, former Major General George B. McClellan over the three other candidates, Democratic candidate, Horatio Seymour, incumbent Republican President Abraham Lincoln and Radical Republican candidate John C. Frémont.

McClellan won the First State by a margin of 5.6%.

Delaware was also one of the only two states to be won by him, the other being neighboring New Jersey.
 
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To come up with popular vote percentages that will lead to a given seat distribution under D'Hondt apportionment, increase each party's seat count by whatever number you want between 0 and 1, then divide the resulting values by their total.
I'm sorry, could you give me an example of what you mean?
 
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