Alternate Wikipedia Infoboxes VI (Do Not Post Current Politics or Political Figures Here)

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(Think a Dole Presidency would've been good?)
 
this would make a fantastic political thriller. Imagine being the poor chump who gets their first, the Chief of Staff, the poor bastard stuck investigating this mess...
“Hey partner, who are those guys in an unmarked car following us everywhere we go?”

“Either some of our guys or some of theirs. Don’t much care to find out”
 
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Henry Stuart was born in 1640, the third son of King Charles of England, Scotland, and Ireland. Made Duke of Gloucester at a young age, Henry was not expected to take the throne, having two older brothers in Charles, Prince of Wales, and James, Duke of York. However fate, or rather politics, intervened. King Charles and Parliament entered into a death spiral of recriminations and disputes over government finances and Royal prerogatives. This provoked the so called “Great Revolution,” in reality a prolonged civil war between King and his Parliament. In the end, Charles was defeated, but managed to flee to the continent, as did Henry’s elder brothers. Henry, aged 9 was both the most senior Royal in Parliament’s custody and young enough to be intimated by his family’s absolutist/“crypto-Catholic” views alleged Parliament. Chicanery ensued as various factions strived to either negotiate a return for Charles or impose their own settlement. In the end it was the New Model Army, under the reluctant command of Sir Thomas Fairfax who secured Henry, although he did not yet depose Charles. Fairfax was made regent, against his better judgement, under terms broadly similar to the Agreement of the People drafted by Henry Ireton.

Fairfax would govern with a council appointed by Parliament, although the army by this point had purged Parliament to preserve army interests, and generally took a light hand. When Charles returned in 1648 with an Army of Scots and Royalists, Henry was placed under heavy guard against agents of his father, and formerly enthroned as it became apparent no negotiations could be made. Eventually forces under Oliver Cromwell would roll north and conquer Scotland, driving Charles into what would be permanent exile. An opportunity was taken to force the Union so long desired by the Stuarts, and Henry became the first King of Great Britain, a designation that included the Irish, although they were too busy being killed by Cromwell to complain.

Henry’s relationship growing up with the men who had deposed his father was obviously tense, enough so that Parliament would mark the start of it’s agreed upon controls over the Armed Forces and Officers of State not from Henry’s coronation but from his assumption of Royal authority once he was of age. He was known to have particularly disliked Cromwell as well as more religiously fanatical types. That said, he was successfully indoctrinated as a Protestant, hewing to the newly reformed Church of England, although accepting the new leveled of toleration for non-Roman Catholic Christians. Henry seems to have been particularly close to his regent, Thomas Fairfax. Fairfax, having never particularly wanted to be de facto ruler, was willing to let Henry take on responsibilities and guide him towards rulership.

Henry’s assumption of full power in 1652 was greeted with trepidation in the halls of power, but jubilation elsewhere. Fairfax had perhaps been too willing to govern by council and despite a newer, biannual Parliament there was no small amount of mismanagement. Henry was seen as a fix, although major appointment were still being made by Parliament. Panic bells rang when Henry mentioned in passing he might use the Royal Veto prerogative on certain bills to incentivize certain appointments. However this proved to be mere negotiation tactics. Henry never truly liked the arrangements, but was willing to work in good faith with Parliament which meant he was never in any danger of sharing his father’s fate. Even when he gained more control Henry generally consulted before making major decisions, although he always tried to make sure he had the final say.

Drawing, perhaps sensibly, more from his Grandfather than his Father, Henry generally preferred a peaceable foreign policy, a few scuffles with the Dutch aside. His marriage with a good, Protestant Princess was mostly arranged by others, with the King needing to be talked into the match by a now retired Fairfax, but Henry seems to have gotten along quite well with Queen Anna Sophie, having three sons and three daughters, although only one girl survived to adulthood. His eldest and namesake was his favorite, although Henry IX seems to have gotten along well with all of his children, with “Good Duke James” becoming something of a folk hero in Scotland. England’s overseas empire would grow and would generally prosper under Henry, finding a new religious settlement that, while at times uneasy did foster peace. Except in Ireland, where the growth of Plantations under Henry ensures that the Stuarts remain largely despised on the Emerald Isle, although no major rebellions broke out under Henry.

Henry IX would die rather suddenly aged 53 after a brief illness. Some whispered poison although no one could come up with a reasonable suspect other than vague fears of Popery. His son would transition to become Henry X fairly easily, although having not spent his formative years under legal bindings, he was perhaps a bit more willing to tussle with
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Stretch

Donor
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(I hate myself for doing this but here it is anyway)
So here's a little party infobox, I figured out from my original writeup that the POD is between right now and roughly early 2025. Here's also the full writeup in form of a wikipedia article screenshot. I may extend this scenario later (since there are a few interesting things that are considered but not explained here) but it would likely be in other threads since it would focus on other parts of the timeline that are closer to ours.
You might be interested in a story on Writers Forum called Hunting Rabbits 2022 Edition. Basically post-pandemic, going out in fursonas is way more popular, I believe partially because it stops COVID transmission?
 
Late Italian First Republic party system with M5S politicians
A table inspired by the wide variety of positions taken by (current or former) Five Star Movement politicians.
The final years of Prima Repubblica (these are the top twelve parties in 1992 general election) were the beginning of a period of radical transformation of the Italian party system: it saw decades-old declining forces, renewed parties and brand new movements briefly coexist. Five Star movement (sans the decades-old thing) has been all of the three things above.
The only modification, in terms of party names, was to rename Pannella List as Radical Party because of the actual leader's name in the party name.

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"Since the re-establishment of the Bonaparte dynasty in 1848, the great powers of Europe have spent a large amount of blood and treasure ensuring that the center of the continent - the wide sweep from the Rhine to the Vistula - is as fragmented as possible. The cast of characters engaged in that effort has changed, but the effort itself has been relatively consistent...

"The First Great European War, which the participants themselves refer to as the Prussian War, saw a rising Prussia threaten Austria, at the time dominant over the German Confederation. French aid to Austria allowed it to compete with Prussia's technologically superior army, thus allowing Napoleon III to expand his influence over the Rhineland regions his uncle had gained and lost; British attempts to contest the region only served to divide it further, initiate a series of proxy wars, and send a stream of refugees who inadvertently helped bring about the Texian Revolution.

"The Second Great European War (or Italian War) was similarly fought between Austria and a rising power, in this case the new Roman Empire. This time, foreign support from Russia allowed the rising power to take on the falling one - the Roman Pope's armies annexed Tyrol, Carniola, and Dalmatia, while Bohemia, Galicia, and Transylvania declared independence with Russian support. But Italian hegemony was little more acceptable to the great powers, most notably Britain and France, than the status quo had been - the 1905 death of Napoleon Joseph, whose adroit political skill was coupled with a deep passivity in foreign affairs, allowed a change in policy, and the coordinated invasion of the Piedmont and Roman Africa prompted dissension between Italian and Slavic nationalists and eventually allowed the independence of Austria's former 'captive nations' and the division of Italy between French protectorates and the British-aligned Kingdom of the Two Sicilies. When British control was broken, first by the effects of overly-aggressive Protestant missionaries and then by the British Revolution, Russia moved in to pick up the pieces.

"With division from the Baltic to the Mediterranean, the Third Great European War was fought instead by choice. Fearful that Russia was consolidating its control over Central Europe, radical members of the Royalist Montagnard League first engineered a provocation in the form of a largely-invented spy scandal in coup against Napoléon Alexandre, resulting in the Dual Monarchy under General Emmanuel Forestier and Princess Hélène, then supported Polish independentists, Pannonian irredentists, and Swedish Occidentalists in the hopes of pushing the Jancović line east. It worked when a group of the latter successfully launched a coup against King Oscar III - in other words, the recent beneficiary of a coup started a coup in order to check the power of the beneficiaries of a long-ago coup. The result was a eight-year war along a frontline that stretched from icebound Spitsbergen to arid Persia, one which claimed more than ten million lives on four continents - and to no real effect. Both France and Russia claim the Third Great European War as a victory, but neither claim it as a particularly honorable, meaningful, or decisive one, though individual heroes and villains receive their own credits.

"Now, half a century after the Treaty of Richmond, what does European grand strategy look like in the XXIth century? It is clear after two decades that Constantine's War had little effect on Russia's long-term aims - an ideological commitment to autocracy has given way to Georgy Rublev's formulation of a 'democracy of the demos' in which each country is formally sacrosanct in its internal affairs, but the view from Petrograd (or, for that matter, Sevastopol, Turku, and Vladivostok) remains fundamentally the same. In France, the same is true - Empress Jeanne's presidential rule has changed the methods of politics from the hands-off governance of her parents, but the goals and effects of that politics remains substantially the same to foreign nations. The substantive changes, instead, have pertained with the second rank of powers. The British Workers' Republic's longstanding insularism has given way to a new generation eager to deal with the Continent. The emergence of Poland, cordially hostile to Russia but far from a mere protectorate of France, has upset the balance of Germany and Slavonia alike. Egypt and Spain also seek to assert their independence from France, and Turkey from Russia: between them, they have transformed the Mediterranean from the 'red circle and purple slice' of Durand's graphical histories to a far more complex situation. Periodic crackdowns on unificationism in Germany and Italy increasingly only water those forbidden fruits; in 2012, for the first time in a century, an explicitly unificationist party (the People's Liberal Party) was allowed into government in a German state, albeit Hanover. And China increasingly puts its hand in, as well, to the consternation of diplomats in the Kremlin and the Élysée alike. It is clear that a bifurcated Europe will no longer be an accurate model."

-Hannibal Student Ponce de León, A Student's Guide to Geopraxis (2015)
 
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Late Italian First Republic party system with M5S politicians
A table inspired by the wide variety of positions taken by (current or former) Five Star Movement politicians.
The final years of Prima Repubblica (these are the top twelve parties in 1992 general election) were the beginning of a period of radical transformation of the Italian party system: it saw decades-old declining forces, renewed parties and brand new movements briefly coexist. Five Star movement (sans the decades-old thing) has been all of the three things above.
The only modification, in terms of party names, was to rename Pannella List as Radical Party because of the actual leader's name in the party name.

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This is great, really creative! The only doubt I have is on Di Battista, he holds anti-capitalist and anti-globalist ideals, but he also come from a MSI family (his father was an hardcore Fascist and IIRC a communal councilor for MSI), and never really had a net cut from his father, so I don't know if Rifondazione is the best place for him. An alternative leader for PRC could be Matteo Mantero, who left the Movement after voting against the Draghi government and joined Potere al Popolo!, becoming their first Senator. In these days he's pushing for the discussion in Parliament of an anti-delocalisation DDL he wrote with the GKN striking workers.
 
This is great, really creative! The only doubt I have is on Di Battista, he holds anti-capitalist and anti-globalist ideals, but he also come from a MSI family (his father was an hardcore Fascist and IIRC a communal councilor for MSI), and never really had a net cut from his father, so I don't know if Rifondazione is the best place for him. An alternative leader for PRC could be Matteo Mantero, who left the Movement after voting against the Draghi government and joined Potere al Popolo!, becoming their first Senator. In these days he's pushing for the discussion in Parliament of an anti-delocalisation DDL he wrote with the GKN striking workers.
I didn't dig too deep in all of M5S politicians background, and I probably kinda wanted all the bigger names to be present. I only knew about Di Maio coming from a MSI and then AN sympatizing family. I thought of ADB as a moderate in 1990s PRC, although the left of PDS may suit him better.
 
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"Japan is a rump paranoid state that's surrounded by enemies. Russia to the north and China to the west, it's no surprise that it became the hermit nation regressing back to the Tokugawa era!" - Former Chinese Chancellor Hu Jintao

Heya! I think this is the right place for this! But this is from my New Luxembourg Timeline, enjoy!
 
Well, it may have been several months but I figured I'd pick up on Japan in my China TL.

*
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The 2021 Japanese election was held on the 4th October 2021, to elect the 465 members of the House of Representatives. It was called after a motion of no confidence was passed by the House in Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga, who took power the previous September.

Suga had had a period of sizeable popularity after his election as Prime Minister, but from mid-2021 onwards started to come under severe criticism due to the perceived mishandling of COVID-19 restrictions and of the 2021 Tokyo Olympics by the government, which many in the public saw as being conducted without proper consideration to the risks to public health. He also tried to court support from the right by championing socially conservative groups like the ultranationalist Nippon Kaigi, which proved contentious and helped unite leftists against him.

Sensing an opportunity to retake power for the first time in a decade, JSP leader Yukio Edano aggressively criticized Suga for the government’s poor Covid response and in August managed to organize a motion of no confidence with the other opposition parties. This motion passed and forced Suga to dissolve the House.

On the campaign trail, two major issues started to cause problems for the major parties. On the LDP side, dissent against Suga started to come to a head, as several LDP members made it clear they would support an alternative leader taking over; it attracted mockery for the possibility of the party changing leaders mid-election, an almost unprecedented scenario, particularly as Suga was merely unpopular rather than at any health risk as Keizo Obuchi had been.

At the same time, however, a pact the opposition made for contesting the FPTP constituencies came to light which allowed the LDP and NIK (Nippon Ishin no Kai, formerly the Innovation Party but now using its Japanese name in all languages) to attack it. The JSP, LPJ, JCP and Reiwa Shinsengumi (a left-wing populist party formed by former actor Tarō Yamamoto) agreed to stand only one candidate between them in various districts, a common practice in the gubernatorial elections in Japan’s prefectures. However, due to some of the rather controversial policies being promoted by the more radical parties and candidates, such as introducing gay marriage laws, tax increases on the rich and replacing nuclear power programmes, the combined endorsements came under fire from the right, who nicknamed them ‘fellow travellers’.

The election saw, as expected, significant gains for the JSP, which achieved a net gain of 80 seats and became the biggest party for the first time since before the 2011 election. However, its allies performed worse than expected, particularly the LPJ, which suffered badly from the ‘fellow travellers’ attacks and dropped from 39 to 26 seats. In other areas, the unified candidates served the opposition well, like Hokkaido, where every FPTP seat went to the JSP.

The total count gave the left-wing and centre-left parties a combined 246 seats between them, enough for an overall majority without the Komeito in an unusual situation in modern Japanese politics. The House voted to make Yukio Edano the new Prime Minister, and his government has set out several rather radical plans, including expanding healthcare funding and introducing a gay marriage bill (LGBTQ advocates in Japan have joked that he is racing with Chinese President Jiang Jielian to be the first country in Asia to recognize it) while working to expand Covid vaccinations and testing.
 
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Henry Stuart was born in 1640, the third son of King Charles of England, Scotland, and Ireland. Made Duke of Gloucester at a young age, Henry was not expected to take the throne, having two older brothers in Charles, Prince of Wales, and James, Duke of York. However fate, or rather politics, intervened. King Charles and Parliament entered into a death spiral of recriminations and disputes over government finances and Royal prerogatives. This provoked the so called “Great Revolution,” in reality a prolonged civil war between King and his Parliament. In the end, Charles was defeated, but managed to flee to the continent, as did Henry’s elder brothers. Henry, aged 9 was both the most senior Royal in Parliament’s custody and young enough to be intimated by his family’s absolutist/“crypto-Catholic” views alleged Parliament. Chicanery ensued as various factions strived to either negotiate a return for Charles or impose their own settlement. In the end it was the New Model Army, under the reluctant command of Sir Thomas Fairfax who secured Henry, although he did not yet depose Charles. Fairfax was made regent, against his better judgement, under terms broadly similar to the Agreement of the People drafted by Henry Ireton.

Fairfax would govern with a council appointed by Parliament, although the army by this point had purged Parliament to preserve army interests, and generally took a light hand. When Charles returned in 1648 with an Army of Scots and Royalists, Henry was placed under heavy guard against agents of his father, and formerly enthroned as it became apparent no negotiations could be made. Eventually forces under Oliver Cromwell would roll north and conquer Scotland, driving Charles into what would be permanent exile. An opportunity was taken to force the Union so long desired by the Stuarts, and Henry became the first King of Great Britain, a designation that included the Irish, although they were too busy being killed by Cromwell to complain.

Henry’s relationship growing up with the men who had deposed his father was obviously tense, enough so that Parliament would mark the start of it’s agreed upon controls over the Armed Forces and Officers of State not from Henry’s coronation but from his assumption of Royal authority once he was of age. He was known to have particularly disliked Cromwell as well as more religiously fanatical types. That said, he was successfully indoctrinated as a Protestant, hewing to the newly reformed Church of England, although accepting the new leveled of toleration for non-Roman Catholic Christians. Henry seems to have been particularly close to his regent, Thomas Fairfax. Fairfax, having never particularly wanted to be de facto ruler, was willing to let Henry take on responsibilities and guide him towards rulership.

Henry’s assumption of full power in 1652 was greeted with trepidation in the halls of power, but jubilation elsewhere. Fairfax had perhaps been too willing to govern by council and despite a newer, biannual Parliament there was no small amount of mismanagement. Henry was seen as a fix, although major appointment were still being made by Parliament. Panic bells rang when Henry mentioned in passing he might use the Royal Veto prerogative on certain bills to incentivize certain appointments. However this proved to be mere negotiation tactics. Henry never truly liked the arrangements, but was willing to work in good faith with Parliament which meant he was never in any danger of sharing his father’s fate. Even when he gained more control Henry generally consulted before making major decisions, although he always tried to make sure he had the final say.

Drawing, perhaps sensibly, more from his Grandfather than his Father, Henry generally preferred a peaceable foreign policy, a few scuffles with the Dutch aside. His marriage with a good, Protestant Princess was mostly arranged by others, with the King needing to be talked into the match by a now retired Fairfax, but Henry seems to have gotten along quite well with Queen Anna Sophie, having three sons and three daughters, although only one girl survived to adulthood. His eldest and namesake was his favorite, although Henry IX seems to have gotten along well with all of his children, with “Good Duke James” becoming something of a folk hero in Scotland. England’s overseas empire would grow and would generally prosper under Henry, finding a new religious settlement that, while at times uneasy did foster peace. Except in Ireland, where the growth of Plantations under Henry ensures that the Stuarts remain largely despised on the Emerald Isle, although no major rebellions broke out under Henry.

Henry IX would die rather suddenly aged 53 after a brief illness. Some whispered poison although no one could come up with a reasonable suspect other than vague fears of Popery. His son would transition to become Henry X fairly easily, although having not spent his formative years under legal bindings, he was perhaps a bit more willing to tussle with
.
I'm really interested what the CofE looks like in this universe. More puritan? more Presbyterian?
 
What (fictional/ahistorical/silly) qualification has been added to the Presidency to create this Wikibox? (Vice Presidents do not conform to the qualification, due to my laziness.)

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