Alternate Wikipedia Infoboxes VI (Do Not Post Current Politics or Political Figures Here)

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During the Greek Revolution of 1821-29, the Island of Samos had rebelled against the government of the Ottoman Empire in favor of the Greek Revolution, however their proximity to the heart of the Ottoman Empire meant that the rebellion in the island was stamped out fast. Nonetheless, as a compromise, the Principality of Samos was created by the Ottomans, which allowed Samos to exist as a semi-autonomous entity within the Empire. In 1914, the Ottomans abolished the system of handpicking the Prince of Samos, and allowed non-partisan elections for the position take place. However, ever since that time, Grigorios Vegleris, the Prince of Samos after 1915, began to become involved in creating a fully functioning partisan democracy within the Samian lands of the Ottoman Empire.

For six years he had persevered and had supported the Ottoman Empire throughout the Balkan War to prove his loyalty to the Ottoman State, and his policies of expanding Greek studies in the island was also moderately paced, to gain the support of the Ottoman Empire. On the 3rd of February, 1921, the Ottoman Chamber of Deputies convened to discuss the draft that he forwarded, which called for a full partisan democracy within the Principality of Samos, and its devolved Assembly. The act was heated, and debated a lot. The Committee of Union and Progress was not eager to grant the draft, and Riza himself was not pleased with the act, however cross-party support from the Liberal Union and the Ottoman Socialist Party made sure that the act passed in the Ottoman Chamber of Deputies with a margin of 153 – 135. As such, the first partisan elections in Samos were going to be held in September of 1921.

In particular, the support of Meletius IV of the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople aided the act to pass. However Meletius IV’s involvement raised eyebrows. He was known to be a supporter of Prime Minister Venizelos of Greece, and there were questions of Greek involvement in the process. Nonetheless, his aid in passing the act through was extremely instrumental nonetheless.

As the government of both Samos and the Ottoman Empire began to prepare for the first partisan elections, two parties came to the forefront. The Liberal Samian Party had been a political group founded by Grigorious Velgeris, and the party was based on the ideology of pro-ottomanism, pro-autonomy, and pro-centrism. It was widely supportive of a welfare state within the Principality of Samos, and gained a lot of support from the ethnic Turks, Jews and Armenians living in the island, as it rejected enosis with the Kingdom of Greece, instead stating that it would support the Ottoman Government as long as it supported the Constitution of 1908, which guaranteed the rights of the island.

The opposition party to the Liberal Samian Party was the Enosis Party led by Themistoklis Sofoulis. Sofoulis was an archaeological student and professor who had been involved in archaeological excavations in Samos before he was elected as a deputy for the islands in 1900. During the 1908 Young Turk Revolution, Sofoulis left Samos due to fear of arrest, and fled to Greece, where he remained a pro-unification agitator. In 1913, his arrest issue was revoked by Ali Kemal on the grounds that he only use political and peaceful means as a means for unification, which Kemal was amenable to. Sofoulis returned, and formed the pro-Unification Enosis Party in Samos, which advocated for unification with the Kingdom of Greece. Economically, the Enosis Party was a Left Nationalist party, and was a supporter of increased funding to the Samian Municipalities and increasing education primarily in Greek above all else, which attracted Greek votes, but alienated the Turkish and Jewish votes.

The main issue during the campaign in the election was the question of unification with Greece. Many moderates pointed out that the Ottoman Empire, by sheer weight of population, would have a larger economy than Greece, and by its capability as a Great Power would be able to protect them from foreign threats that Greece might not be able to. The Liberal Samian Party (LSP) also attacked the Greek centric view of the Enosis Party, pointing at the noticeable Turkish and Jewish population of the island, who would be alienated by the greek-centric policies that the Enosis Party promised. The Enosis Party focused on the Greek population of the island, and instead promised that a unification with Greece in a democratic manner would allow ‘an amicable but complete divorce with the Ottoman Empire’. As such the slogan ‘Amicable Divorce’ or Filikó diazýgio in Greek became the catchphrase of the Enosis Party’s campaign.

Finally when the time came to go to polls, the Liberal Samian Party managed to gain a total plurality of the votes, winning 41.4% or 6,607 votes and gaining 22 seats in the 53 seats Samian Assembly. The Enosis Party gained 4,996 votes (31.3%) and gained 16 seats in the Assembly. Independents took up 14 seats (most independents were largely neutral to the idea of unification with Greece and voted mostly on economic and social issues) whilst 1 speaker was appointed by the Ottoman Government. Due to no party or political group gaining majority, Vegleris formed a minority government within the legislature with his Liberal Samian Party and some pro-LSP independents at the helm. As such, in the contingent elections, he was re-elected as the Prince of Samos, whilst his preferred candidate, Alexandros Stavridis [5], was elected to be President of the Samian Assembly, which allowed him to consolidate his power over the Assembly as well.

The first partisan election of the Principality of Samos was something to behold truly, and would set the tone for the Enosis vs Anti-Enosis politics that would dominate the island until the end of the Second Great War. It would also prove that centrism as an ideology was growing in the Ottoman Empire, and set the tone for the 1922 Ottoman General Election.


From my TL: Osman Reborn The Survival of Ottoman Democracy
 
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In 1920, the Irish Home Rule Government would have to go polls again according to the Irish Home Rule Act which guaranteed the right to vote every five years in a general elections and determined the length of government to be 5 years each. In 1918, the death of Redmond had given pause to the Irish government, however the quick ascension of William O’Brien had staved off a possible crisis. The elections of 1920 would prove to be an interesting one.

Ireland was rife with division. One section of Irish society, the society that lived on the eastern coast, and the major cities all didn’t have much separatism present, however the rural society of Irish society were extremely separatist and mostly republican in nature. This all boils down to economics, by and large. Despite the hostility even many ambivalent Irishmen had to the English and Scots, the economic power of the United Kingdom, which was still by far the largest economy on the planet, was just too much to lose for the money minded, and the economic independence that had been given to the Irish after the Home Rule Bill allowed the Irish to benefit their own society allaying some fears in Irish society. A sense of comradely also developed in Ireland over the Great War and Home Rule Passage within the coastal Irishmen and many British men. The idea of being Western British in Ireland was becoming strong, at least within the eastern coast of Ireland. In the rural areas however, Irish separatism remained powerful and a driving force in politics. There, the lack of proper investment naturally made many people look for independence, and the usual catholic and protestant divide only furthered this deep hole further. Soon enough, an urban and rural divide in Ireland would start to form as the urban society of Ireland shunned full independence from Britain whilst the rural society demanded it.

The question of Northern Ireland remained too. The Northern Irish remained out of the Home Rule Area, and they had voted against joining the Home Rule area as well, which made any claims that the Irish had on rejoining Northern Ireland into Ireland an impossibility as they would show their opponents in Westminster that they would flout democracy if needed to meet their own goals, which O’Brien was not willing to do at all. The Ulstermen of the Northern Irish were actively opposing union with the Home Rule area of Ireland and remained under the direct control of Westminster, without any sort of devolution, barring some extra powers given to the counties and shires. Many Irish nationalists saw this as a slight and wanted to reunify Ireland, only to be met with resistance from not only the Ulstermen but also from the government, with O’Brien famously stating in January 3, 1920 that ‘Ulster will join the rest of us of their own free will. If we are to remain a democratic society then their decision to remain out will be respected and adhered to.’

Of course, this sentiment was not shared by many Irish nationalists. Nonetheless, despite this atmosphere, O’Brien had walked forward looking past these, and continued the implement economic reforms, which proved themselves to be popular among the common Irish person. The Cottage Construction Act of 1919 had provided thousands of homeless men and women with homes throughout Ireland, and the railroad and road construction schemes made by O’Brien increased railroad coverage in Ireland and increase transportation links throughout Irish society as new highways were constructed within Ireland. Galway saw a massive upswing in governmental intervention as the city was industrialized to come onto the same level as Cork and Dublin. Veteran’s Welfare Act was also passed by the man which gave a series of health insurances and welfare exemptions to Irish veterans of the Great War. All of these economic policies made O’Brien personally extremely popular within Irish society.

Meanwhile the Irish Unionist Party was formed in 1919 as an official party within Ireland rather than the disparate branch of Irish unionists going on the same ticket as the Irish Unionist League. Viscount Midleton, to say the least, was not a charismatic speaker, however the party in and of itself was capable of utilizing and exploiting the increased feeling of solidarity between Ireland and Britain due to the Great War, and it sort of became Ireland’s branch of the Conservative Party from mainland Britain. Irish Unionists scoured the countryside in the runnup to the 1920 Elections, and began to use propaganda reels to increase their attraction and rather than just running on the platform of unionism as was usual for them before 1920, they began to form proper and coherent economic and political policies to increase their political legitimacy in Irish society. These actions would prove to be useful and would increase their share of seats in the Irish Commons. Meanwhile, as the Unionists did their thing, Irish Labour wanted to exploit the increase of the suffrage and targeted Irish Trade Unions and Worker Councils to gain more votes. They wanted to at least gain representation in the irish Commons, and increase their voting share. Cork and Dublin voting largely in favor of the Labourites during the 1918 General Elections had been a good sign for them. Johnson would lead the party through with the 1920 convention on the 7th of January, 1920 which would see the party adopt an official social democratic ideology and policy, in line with the mainland Labour party. The Liberals largely had an ambivalent and centrist policy of campaigning within Ireland and didn’t do much all things considered. However Sinn Fein lead by Arthur Griffith showed itself as the new Irish separatist party and campaigned on a policy of economic nationalism and pro-dominionship, and they advocated that Ireland ought to be a Dominion, with a free legislature and economy free from British control, but still within the British Empire as a whole. This was the moderate position for many nationalists, and it did attract a good amount of votes during the elections.

As the country went to polls on the 8th of February, 1920, the IPP retained their large share of the seats in government, though the Irish Unionists increased their share of the seats in government. Labour made important ground within the Irish trade unions and managed to gain several key votes within Dublin, Cork, Waterford and Galway, which allowed the party to become the third largest party within the Commons. The Liberals gained 10 seats, and Sinn Fein managed to win 8 seats, mostly rural constituencies. 8 independents were elected, out of which 7 were independent nationalists, again, mostly from rural constituencies. O’Brien formed a new minority government and retained the position of First Minister of Ireland within the United Kingdom.

With the mandate that he needed, O’Brien began to conduct several new economic reforms, with the man intent on bringing Ireland on the level of industrialization as that of Northern Ireland, which was at least around 40% more industrialized on a per capita basis than the rest of Ireland. O’Brien’s policy of economic building and increasing the manufacturing capability of Ireland would prove to have dividends down the line, long after he had passed way.


From my TL: Osman Reborn The Survival of Ottoman Democracy
 
The story of the year undoubtedly continues to be the brash, young Vietnam side’s incredible showing through the test season and qualifying tournaments. After the stunning upset in Cape Town over South Africa, which saw the Golden Dragons outscore the Springboks by a three-try margin with a breathless, red-letter performance from fly-half Nguyen Cuong, Vietnam rises to number three in World Rugby rankings. The traditionally dominant Australian and English sides are still considered the safe favorites for victory in the World Cup, but if the pattern continues, the Golden Dragons could pull off another surprise.

The Chinese side held steady at thirteen in the rankings after the week’s matches. The soon-to-be hosts of the 2021 Rugby World Cup themselves have had a strong year, earning their best ranking since the country re-joined World Rugby in 2002 in the aftermath of
Jiědòng. As China prepares to be the first Asian nation to host the Rugby World Cup, the national side has become something of a dark-horse pick for a top-three finish.

But the bright future of the sport is not the only narrative taking shape around the RWC; her storied past has captured the imagination of fans as well. Rowan Lehner has coached the California side to ninth place after a tough, trench-battle victory over Japan, its best ranking in twenty years, and its first top ten ranking since the end of Team USA era in 2013. France, victor over California in the 2001 RWC, continues its own rise in the rankings. With both sides automatic qualifiers for 2021, California fans would be excused for feeling hopeful for redemption, while the French will be aiming to put the risen shade of 2001 to rest with another hard-fought victory...if the fated encounter is, in fact, predestined.


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The story of the year undoubtedly continues to be the brash, young Vietnam side’s incredible showing through the test season and qualifying tournaments. After the stunning upset in Cape Town over South Africa, which saw the Golden Dragons outscore the Springboks by a three-try margin with a breathless, red-letter performance from fly-half Nguyen Cuong, Vietnam rises to number three in World Rugby rankings. The traditionally dominant Australian and English sides are still considered the safe favorites for victory in the World Cup, but if the pattern continues, the Golden Dragons could pull off another surprise.

The Chinese side held steady at thirteen in the rankings after the week’s matches. The soon-to-be hosts of the 2021 Rugby World Cup themselves have had a strong year, earning their best ranking since the country re-joined World Rugby in 2002 in the aftermath of
Jiědòng. As China prepares to be the first Asian nation to host the Rugby World Cup, the national side has become something of a dark-horse pick for a top-three finish.

But the bright future of the sport is not the only narrative taking shape around the RWC; her storied past has captured the imagination of fans as well. Rowan Lehner has coached the California side to ninth place after a tough, trench-battle victory over Japan, its best ranking in twenty years, and its first top ten ranking since the end of Team USA era in 2013. France, victor over California in the 2001 RWC, continues its own rise in the rankings. With both sides automatic qualifiers for 2021, California fans would be excused for feeling hopeful for redemption, while the French will be aiming to put the risen shade of 2001 to rest with another hard-fought victory...if the fated encounter is, in fact, predestined.


iEkzzxX.png
I don't even like rugby and I'm intrigued! Some of these flag choices... curious.
 
I don't even like rugby and I'm intrigued! Some of these flag choices... curious.
Thanks, Patton :) I've always had a love for rugby, and it's fun to do something a little bit out of the norm for the thread (and like i told mikey time to learn more about the rugger, nerd).

I'll admit that a few of those flag choices were done just for the fun of it, and reconciling all of them would probably be a bit of a task; I enjoy how something small like flag choice can imply a lot about the AH without having to infodump.
 
How do people work out voting percentages and popular vote with elections?
I usually use contemporary elections adjacent to the AH wikibox as a reference, then basically ask "how much, roughly, would turnout swing, would percentages swing, etc".

Tbh the last 3 digits of my total vote numbers are almost always entirely made up, as we're talking like 0.001% differences here. Don't sweat what you put in the hundreds place.
 
I usually use contemporary elections adjacent to the AH wikibox as a reference, then basically ask "how much, roughly, would turnout swing, would percentages swing, etc".

Tbh the last 3 digits of my total vote numbers are almost always entirely made up, as we're talking like 0.001% differences here. Don't sweat what you put in the hundreds place.
totally! For instance, going by the Kiwi Laser Flag, this is very clearly the Best Timeline.
 
I would love to see a TL about the Civil War becoming an international conflict.

What would be the POD?
It's a wonderful idea and I'd love to see what happens! For a POD, probably something to do with France. Russia was willing to defend the Union (thank you Cassius Clay), but Napoleon III was hesitant to support the Confederacy. I used the Siege of New Orleans as a not-turning-point, thus allowing France to feel much more confident in supporting the Confederacy.
 
It's a wonderful idea and I'd love to see what happens! For a POD, probably something to do with France. Russia was willing to defend the Union (thank you Cassius Clay), but Napoleon III was hesitant to support the Confederacy. I used the Siege of New Orleans as a not-turning-point, thus allowing France to feel much more confident in supporting the Confederacy.

What did Muhammad Ali have to with Russia?

Just kidding.

What did Clay have to do with Russian diplomacy?

I wonder how Russia might've evolved if it fought alongisde America. Would Alexander II have pushed for democracy earlier, after seeing how mighty the American republic was?
 
What did Muhammad Ali have to with Russia?

Just kidding.

What did Clay have to do with Russian diplomacy?

I wonder how Russia might've evolved if it fought alongisde America. Would Alexander II have pushed for democracy earlier, after seeing how mighty the American republic was?
Russia and the US got along pretty well in the 19th century. Though the main reason was the idea to screw with Britain if they tried anything, which seemed a realistic possibility at the time.

How the war starts would be important. The British and french people were understandably sympathetic to the union, especially as the war became clearly about slavery. If elites in those two nations push for war to protect the CSA, that could cause issues for their war effort.
 
Russia and the US got along pretty well in the 19th century. Though the main reason was the idea to screw with Britain if they tried anything, which seemed a realistic possibility at the time.

How the war starts would be important. The British and french people were understandably sympathetic to the union, especially as the war became clearly about slavery. If elites in those two nations push for war to protect the CSA, that could cause issues for their war effort.

But this war could be far more consequential to American history than the OTL Civil War was.

Not only would America have saved itself from division, but it did so while telling the French, a Great European power, to fuck off, while rescuing Mexico's own democracy would just be an incredible demonstration of Russia's rise as a superpower.

Tsarist Russia too, by winning this war, would find itself with no only incredible prestige, but it could also modernize much more quickly.
 
What did Clay have to do with Russian diplomacy?

I wonder how Russia might've evolved if it fought alongisde America. Would Alexander II have pushed for democracy earlier, after seeing how mighty the American republic was?
Cassius Clay was the ambassador to Russia, and saw Alexander II's abolition of serfdom as an inspiration for the Union war effort, and was able to secure an alliance with Russia (including assistance in blockading the Atlantic) by drawing the comparison between abolishing serfdom in Russia and slavery in the US

How the war starts would be important. The British and french people were understandably sympathetic to the union, especially as the war became clearly about slavery. If elites in those two nations push for war to protect the CSA, that could cause issues for their war effort.
My original idea was that France intervened before the Emancipation Proclamation was written (and, although it was tighter than I anticipated, I did succeed in that regards), and thus the French could pass off the war as "about state's rights and economic independence" and tactfully avoid the slavery debate.
 
My original idea was that France intervened before the Emancipation Proclamation was written (and, although it was tighter than I anticipated, I did succeed in that regards), and thus the French could pass off the war as "about state's rights and economic independence" and tactfully avoid the slavery debate.

I have a feeling that if Napoleon did forcefully intervene in this war and lost, it could mean the collapse of his regime.

He would not only lost the war, but the French would be angry for having fought to protect a slaveowner society and a puppet Mexican regime.

Oh boy, this would have major knockoff effects on a lot of stuff, like the German reunification.
 
Just France intervening is still probably an american win. Especially if France is in mexico still at the time, and thus distracted.

France really needs Britain to join them, which is what they wanted IOTL before even considering intervening.
 
I have a feeling that if Napoleon did forcefully intervene in this war and lost, it could mean the collapse of his regime.

He would not only lost the war, but the French would be angry for having fought to protect a slaveowner society and a puppet Mexican regime.

Oh boy, this would have major knockoff effects on a lot of stuff, like the German reunification.
Yep! Agree 100%, the August Crisis is Napoleon III's regime collapsing.
 
Just France intervening is still probably an american win. Especially if France is in mexico still at the time, and thus distracted.

France really needs Britain to join them, which is what they wanted IOTL before even considering intervening.

Even if Britannia entered the war, America and Russia have a shit ton of advantages over Britain and France: population, geography, numbers, etc.

But how does the balance of power in the world shift if Britain and France are laid low, and both Russia and America are the powers standing astride the world?
 
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