Alternate Wikipedia Infoboxes VI (Do Not Post Current Politics or Political Figures Here)

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Please confine current politiucs (and Obama is VERY MUCH, current) to Chat.
My apologies but I sincerely don't think this is Current Politics. The 2008 election happened 13 years ago/4 election cycles ago. There are members old enough to be on this site that have no real recollection of the 2008 election being of the age of 5 years old.

I think the Current Politics rule of thumb of no info boxes about the current and directly prior election cycle is good for proactively pruning out the 2020 and 2016 potential infoboxes which can stir controversy but this seems like too much pruning. After all, wouldn't this new standard mean that infoboxes about Hilliary Clinton or George Bush of which I've seen would be removed because these figures are current politics despite being retired like Obama? And its not like these 2008/2012 boxes have caused flamewars in this thread so I don't think sequestering these posts in a pol chat thread would do nothing for the 'stability' of this thread.

It doesn't benefit the posters of the infobox themselves if they had to post in the pol chat thread because there's no real political meat on that post at all, its just an infobox and an electoral map, something that's barebones necessary for an election infobox.

Thank you for reading and have a good day.
 

CalBear

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My apologies but I sincerely don't think this is Current Politics. The 2008 election happened 13 years ago/4 election cycles ago. There are members old enough to be on this site that have no real recollection of the 2008 election being of the age of 5 years old.

I think the Current Politics rule of thumb of no info boxes about the current and directly prior election cycle is good for proactively pruning out the 2020 and 2016 potential infoboxes which can stir controversy but this seems like too much pruning. After all, wouldn't this new standard mean that infoboxes about Hilliary Clinton or George Bush of which I've seen would be removed because these figures are current politics despite being retired like Obama? And its not like these 2008/2012 boxes have caused flamewars in this thread so I don't think sequestering these posts in a pol chat thread would do nothing for the 'stability' of this thread.

It doesn't benefit the posters of the infobox themselves if they had to post in the pol chat thread because there's no real political meat on that post at all, its just an infobox and an electoral map, something that's barebones necessary for an election infobox.

Thank you for reading and have a good day.
Actually Current Politics "Rule of Thumb" is political leaders or policies who are still of high visibility and/or controversy and those likely to cause current political debate in a non Chat Thread. Time is a consideration (you can get a pretty heated debate over Nixon or FDR, but it is also not going to involve current politics unless someone drags it in kicking and screaming from the audience) but not to the exclusion of things like Roe v. .Wade, despite that case being a 1973 SCOTUS decision.

Obama very much falls into the Current Politics basket. The current de facto leader of the Republican Party targets him and his Administration on a regular basis.
 
Using this as inspiration, I made my own version

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Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – February 26, 1887) was an American lawyer and statesman who served as the 16th president of the United States from 1861 until 1869. Lincoln led the nation through the American Civil War, the country's greatest moral, cultural, constitutional, and political crisis. He succeeded in preserving the Union, aiding Reconstruction, abolishing slavery, bolstering the federal government, and modernizing the U.S. economy.

Lincoln was born into poverty in a log cabin and was raised on the frontier primarily in Indiana. He was self-educated and became a lawyer, Whig Party leader, Illinois state legislator, and U.S. Congressman from Illinois. In 1849, he returned to his law practice but became vexed by the opening of additional lands to slavery as a result of the Kansas–Nebraska Act. He reentered politics in 1854, becoming a leader in the new Republican Party, and he reached a national audience in the 1858 debates against Stephen Douglas. Lincoln ran for President in 1860, sweeping the North in victory. Pro-slavery elements in the South equated his success with the North's rejection of their right to practice slavery, and southern states began seceding from the union. To secure its independence, the new Confederate States fired on Fort Sumter, a U.S. fort in the South, and Lincoln called up forces to suppress the rebellion and restore the Union.

Lincoln, a moderate Republican, had to navigate a contentious array of factions with friends and opponents from both the Democratic and Republican parties. War Democrats rallied a large faction of former opponents into his moderate camp, but they were countered by Radical Republicans, who demanded harsh treatment of the Southern Confederates. Anti-war Democrats (called "Copperheads") despised Lincoln, and irreconcilable pro-Confederate elements plotted his assassination. He managed the factions by exploiting their mutual enmity, by carefully distributing political patronage, and by appealing to the American people. His Gettysburg Address became a historic clarion call for nationalism, republicanism, equal rights, liberty, and democracy. Lincoln scrutinized the strategy and tactics in the war effort, including the selection of generals and the naval blockade of the South's trade. He suspended habeas corpus, and he averted British intervention by defusing the Trent Affair. He engineered the end to slavery with his Emancipation Proclamation and his order that the Army protect and recruit former slaves. He also encouraged border states to outlaw slavery, and promoted the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which outlawed slavery across the country.

Lincoln managed his own successful re-election campaign. He oversaw the end of the Civil War at Appomattox on April 9, 1865. On the evening of April 14, 1865, he attended Ford's theatre, near the White House in Washington D.C., where an assassination attempt by John Wilkes Booth took place, however Lincoln's bodyguard tackled Booth before he could fire at Lincoln, saving the president's life.

Using the political capital from the assassination attempt, Lincoln led a political crusade to gain public support for the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment. The Amendment would pass congress by two-thirds majorities and would be ratified officially on December 18, 1865. Lincoln then pushed for the passage of the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments, which would be ratified in 1866 and 1868 respectively, both before the conclusion of his presidency. Realizing former slave owners would likely be opposed to an integrated society, Lincoln proposed a settlement policy in the Indian Territory, encouraging and promising federal funding for the settlement of the land by freed slaves, as a means of preventing destructive race riots in the still rebuilding and vitriolic South. Though criticized by some Radical Republicans, the policy was widely supported by moderate Republicans and Democrats alike.

Lincoln became a Republican once again in 1868, to campaign for General Ulysses S. Grant to be his successor as President. Lincoln's cross country tour for Grant led to the general winning a landslide victory, winning 247 of 294 electoral votes, and 54.0% of the popular vote nationwide, against Andrew Johnson, Lincoln's vice president. Lincoln left office in March of 1869 and went into a quiet retirement back in his home of Illinois. He died of natural causes in 1887 at the age of 78 years old. He is regarded as one of America's greatest presidents, generally ranked in the top three by most historians.
In connection with this

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I'm not sure I understand the spelling reform here - it looks like c is replaced with k in syllable-final contexts but not elsewhere, do I have that right?

I assume 'Fait' is 'Faith' rather than 'Fate', though 'American Fate Initiative' sounds metal as hell.

I’m still hammering thru the precise details of the reform scheme, though its loosely based on some OTL 19th century proposals from various sources & my own whim, admittedly. As far as -k, yeah that seems to be the general rule I was following though I hadn’t even noticed.

Fait does stand for faith haha, though I agree, America Fate Initiative does sound pretty awesome and I toyed with actually naming it that since the AFI is nationalist in nature.
 
An OTL Wikibox I made:

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[1] The presence of the Continental Army around White Plains in preparation for a potential assault on New York City put a temporary stop to any raids during the campaigning period of 1780.


During the American Revolutionary War, following the British Occupation of NYC and Patriot control of Upstate NY, Westchester was put in the unfortunate position of being a no man's land between both sides. The County was subject to raids on both sides which over the course of several years depopulated entire towns as people fled. This was briefly stopped in 1780 as Washington parked his army while planning on an assault to retake NYC. The French met up with Washington in 1781 around White Plains and it was decided to instead head South to Virginia, eventually leading to the Siege of Yorktown. Raids resumed until the British evacuated in 1783. Despite the devastation, the County quickly recovered and over the next few decades became a commuter county for wealthy people escaping from NYC.
 
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My apologies but I sincerely don't think this is Current Politics. The 2008 election happened 13 years ago/4 election cycles ago. There are members old enough to be on this site that have no real recollection of the 2008 election being of the age of 5 years old.

I think the Current Politics rule of thumb of no info boxes about the current and directly prior election cycle is good for proactively pruning out the 2020 and 2016 potential infoboxes which can stir controversy but this seems like too much pruning. After all, wouldn't this new standard mean that infoboxes about Hilliary Clinton or George Bush of which I've seen would be removed because these figures are current politics despite being retired like Obama? And its not like these 2008/2012 boxes have caused flamewars in this thread so I don't think sequestering these posts in a pol chat thread would do nothing for the 'stability' of this thread.

It doesn't benefit the posters of the infobox themselves if they had to post in the pol chat thread because there's no real political meat on that post at all, its just an infobox and an electoral map, something that's barebones necessary for an election infobox.

Thank you for reading and have a good day.

Actually Current Politics "Rule of Thumb" is political leaders or policies who are still of high visibility and/or controversy and those likely to cause current political debate in a non Chat Thread. Time is a consideration (you can get a pretty heated debate over Nixon or FDR, but it is also not going to involve current politics unless someone drags it in kicking and screaming from the audience) but not to the exclusion of things like Roe v. .Wade, despite that case being a 1973 SCOTUS decision.

Obama very much falls into the Current Politics basket. The current de facto leader of the Republican Party targets him and his Administration on a regular basis.
I think that both of you make very good points about this, @Yankeewolf and @CalBear . Yankeewolf has a point because Obama has been out of office since 2017 and that the 2008 US Presidential Election was nearly 13 years ago and likely won't cause flame-wars and such. On the other hand, Calbear has a point about Obama still being a culturally relevant political figure and that his Vice President (Joe Biden) is now in office.
 
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Following his victory at the Battle of Bannockburn, Robert the Bruce sought to deal another blow to the English, and so dispatched his brother Edward to Ireland to destroy English power there. This proved immensely successful and indeed Edward was able to secure the title of High King of Ireland, achieving a personal Union after Robert died without issue. Although the Bruce’s would be unable to turn the High Kingship into a hereditary position, they only claimed the title after Edward, and never truly controlled all Ireland, they eclipsed the English as the dominant power in Ireland, with substantial holdings in the North. The high point for the Bruces came when, having aided in the successful rebellion against the English, the new Prince of Wales swore fealty to the King of Scots. However nothing lasts forever. A resurgent England forced Wales to switch allegiances again, and Scottish power waned in Ireland. By the end of the Bruce line, all that remained were some paltry possessions in Ulster and the power of Scotland.

Like many Medieval amalgamations the Kingdom of the Bruce never truly unified, hence the name used by historians. The King acted as a feudal overlord in Scotland and a Clan head while on the various campaigns in Ireland. The Welsh Princes never were truly brought to heal. However, compared to other superstates such as the Angevin or Holy Roman Empires a sense of collective identity did emerge. Much of this was anti-English in character, despite the use of both French and English at court on occasion. Bruce Kings often took up grand titles such as “Defender of the Britons,” “King of the Gaels,” or “Hammer of the Saxons.” Irish, Scottish Gaelic and Welsh all saw flourishing during the reign of the Bruces.

Although ultimately not long for the world, the Kingdom of the Bruce remained fixed in the national imaginations of all. A Golden Age of English Weakness and a time of glory for the other nations of the British Isles.
 
As a continuation of my universe where JFK Lives, here is the alt-Wikipedia entry on LBJ:

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"Lyndon B. Johnson (August 27, 1908 - July 19, 1977), often referred to by his initials LBJ, was the 36th President of the United States from 1969 to 1973. Johnson's term was marked by an expansion of the New Frontier programs of his predecessor, John F. Kennedy, and the breakdown of the international Bretton Woods system that had driven global finance since the end of the Second World War.

Born in 1908 to an influential Texas Democratic politician, Samuel Ealy Johnson Jr., LBJ graduated from Southwest Texas State Teachers College before working as a schoolteacher in Southern Texas. Johnson's time teaching in segregated schools during the early stages of the Great Depression influenced his liberal political ideals, and following Franklin D. Roosevelt's election as President in 1932 LBJ became a stalwart supporter of the New Deal. Johnson entered electoral politics in 1937 when he was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives, where he served until 1949. His career as a member of the House was primarily marked by his ambition to become a U.S. Senator: in 1941 he ran in a special Senate election but lost amidst allegations that his Democratic primary opponent W. Lee O'Daniel had engaged in voter fraud. Johnson ran again in 1948, this time winning by 87 votes — with observers accusing "Landslide Lyndon" of having stolen the election.

Regardless, Johnson quickly rose through the Senate ranks and in 1953 — at the age of only 44 years old — he was elected Senate Democratic leader and in 1955 he became Senate Majority Leader. Standing at least six foot three inches tall, Johnson used his great height and forceful personality to bend other Senators to his will. Historians consistently rank LBJ as the greatest Senate Majority Leader in history. In 1957, Johnson used his influence to pass the Civil Rights Act of 1957: the first federal civil rights legislation since Reconstruction. In 1960, Johnson ran for the Democratic presidential nomination. But having competed in none of the primaries, he was outmaneuvered by Massachusetts Senator John F. Kennedy who won the nomination on the first ballot. To unite the party and carry the South in the general election against Richard Nixon, Kennedy selected Johnson as his running mate. The Kennedy/Johnson ticket won by one of the narrowest margins in American history.

As Vice-President, Johnson felt consistently sidelined by Kennedy's Harvard-educated Ivy League men who looked down on LBJ as a brute. Nonetheless, Kennedy himself respected Johnson and gave him important duties such as overseeing the Space Program and the President's Committee on Equal Employment Opportunities. Johnson's personal finances and relationship to the scandalous Bobby Baker were subject to a Congressional inquiry in November 1963, but this investigation was dropped when LBJ nearly assumed the Presidency following an assassination attempt against President Kennedy. Johnson used his influence to help JFK pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, Medicare, and Medicaid. By 1967, Johnson was preparing to run for President in 1968 and he carefully worked behind the scenes to cultivate support from party bosses, labor unions, and civil rights groups. At the 1968 Democratic Convention, Johnson finally won the Democratic nomination he had long sought. But the fall of South Vietnam the previous year and the numerous riots that had occurred under Kennedy gave the advantage to Richard Nixon, who was widely favored to win.

A crucial turning point in the campaign came in the 1968 TV debates. Johnson accepted Nixon’s challenge to a debate, hoping to turn around his flailing campaign. Nixon had wanted to redeem his mistakes from 1960, thinking Johnson an easier opponent than Kennedy. Responding to Nixon’s attacks on Kennedy’s policy towards Vietnam, Johnson replied, “The loss of South Vietnam was a tragedy not only for the people of Indochina but all men and women in the free world. But as President Kennedy said in 1963, ‘it’s their war, they’re the ones who have to win it or lose it.’ We did all we could to save South Vietnam short of a disastrous land war in East Asia. We trained their army, gave them equipment, sent billions in economic and military aid, bombed the North, and in the end we came out with a ceasefire agreement that held off the Communist advance for two years.” Johnson then dramatically turned towards Nixon while pointing his finger like a prosecutor condemning the accused, “if my opponent had been President of the United States in 1965 instead of John F. Kennedy, he would have sent your sons nine or ten thousand miles away to fight and die in a war that Asian boys needed to fight for themselves.” This caught Nixon off guard. Indeed, he had advocated direct military intervention in 1965 before backtracking in 1967. The usually articulate Nixon struggled to respond to Johnson’s attack, once again sweating profusely under the room’s lights as he had done in 1960. Nixon replied by comparing JFK to Neville Chamberlain, invoking the domino theory to suggest that Japan, Taiwan, Laos, and Cambodia would be next to fall under Communist domination. Maintaining his composure, Johnson retorted by asking, “would Neville Chamberlain have gotten Soviet missiles out of Cuba without firing a shot? Would Neville Chamberlain have neutralized Communist aggression in Laos? Would Neville Chamberlain have reduced the nuclear threat to the United States while avoiding war? Once Mr. Nixon answers these questions, then he may compare President Kennedy to the biggest coward of the twentieth century.” The debates were a tremendous success for Johnson, who surged in the polls. On election day, Johnson defeated Nixon and Wallace by over 7% in the popular vote and 345 electoral votes.

Taking office in 1969, Johnson oversaw the first manned mission to the moon when Apollo 11 landed on the lunar surface in July of that year. Despite his Southern roots, LBJ used the Justice Department to aggressively enforce Brown v Board of Education, integrate Southern schools, and implement forced busing. Johnson took up the legislative proposals that had failed to pass under Kennedy: using his trademark combination of intimidation and flattery LBJ convinced Congress to pass the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1969, the Higher Education Act of 1969, and the Head Start program. Johnson also created the Corporation of Public Broadcasting to provide free news service to the American people. Johnson argued that these measures would create a “Great Society” that expanded upon the achievements of the New Frontier. Yet Johnson’s popularity began to erode when his appointment of Abe Fortas to succeed Earl Warren as Chief Justice was filibustered by the Senate. Instead, the President was forced to appoint Homer Thornberry as Warren’s successor. While Republicans laid charges of corruption against LBJ, as Fortas had been a close Johnson confidant with questionable ethics issues, his choice of Thornberry shifted the Supreme Court in a more liberal direction for another generation.

By 1970, Johnson was forced to contend with a growing crisis in the economy. The high levels of federal deficit spending used to fund JFK’s New Frontier had spurred rising inflation while a mild recession led unemployment to rise above 6% by December 1970. The inflation and the recession created a backlash against Johnson and the Democratic Party, who were increasingly seen as more concerned about giving government handouts to the poor and aiding racial minorities than the white working class voters who had traditionally voted Democratic in the South and the Rust Belt. In the 1970 midterm elections, Republicans gained Senate seats in Missouri, Indiana, New Mexico, and Texas while eating into the Democratic House majority. Nonetheless, historians credit Johnson for his skillful handling of the recession: he lowered interest rates to encourage economic growth and beefed up the budget for federal spending on the economic relief programs passed under JFK. In August 1971, LBJ averted the devaluation of the U.S. dollar when he ended the international gold standard — a major change of policy that observers called the “Johnson shock.”

Johnson was expected to run for a second term, but from the time he began his run for the Presidency in 1968 he had intended to retire in 1973. While still Vice-President, Johnson commissioned an actuarial study that predicted he would die at age 64. In early 1971 LBJ had a mild heart attack brought on by the stress of the Presidency. Not wanting to die in office, in his 1972 State of the Union address Johnson announced that, “With our nation struggling to recover from an economic crisis, with millions of Americans still going hungry because they have lost their jobs or their salaries no longer pay for enough food on the family table, I do not believe that I should devote an hour or a day of my time to any personal partisan causes or to any duties other than the awesome duties of this office–the Presidency of your country. Accordingly, I shall not seek, and I will not accept, the nomination of my party for another term as your President.”

This stunned the country, and left the Democratic field wide open for 1972. The frontrunner was Vice-President Hubert H. Humphrey, who had the support of party bosses. But the favorite in the primaries was Massachusetts Governor and former Secretary of Defense, Attorney General, and 1960 Democratic campaign manager Robert F. Kennedy. RFK’s charisma carried him to sweeping victories in the primaries, where Humphrey did not even compete. But Johnson, who loathed RFK, worked to ensure that the party bosses blocked his nomination at the 1972 Democratic Convention. Instead, Humphrey was nominated on the third ballot. Unwisely, rather than picking a Southerner or a Westerner who might have balanced the ticket Humphrey chose Maine Senator Edmund Muskie as his running mate. After twelve years of dramatic change under Democratic rule, the country was ready to turn the page back to the Republicans and California Governor Ronald Reagan defeated Humphrey in the general election.

After leaving office on January 20, 1973, Johnson retired to his ranch in Stonewall, Texas. He lived a quiet life where he made few public appearances until his death of a heart attack at age 68. By maintaining a healthy diet and rarely drinking or smoking, Johnson had managed to live four years longer than predicted when he was Vice-President. Today, historians rank Johnson as a successful President who led the United States through an economic crisis, enforced civil rights more than both Eisenhower and JFK, expanded the New Frontier through the Great Society, and placed the welfare of the nation over his own ambitions by choosing not to run for a second term in 1972.

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"Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911- June 5, 2004) was an American actor and politician who served as the 37th President of the United States from 1973 to 1981. Although he is an icon to conservatives who hail him for his eloquent critiques of liberalism, most historians regard Reagan as a mediocre President who presided over two painful recessions and the massive expansion of the federal debt and deficit.

Reagan was born in Tampico, Illinois to a family of modest means before graduating from Eureka College in 1932. He began his career as a radio sports commentator, then moved to Hollywood to become an actor. The young Reagan was known for his outspoken liberalism, having campaigned for Harry Truman in 1948. By the early 1950s, Reagan's Hollywood career began to decline and he shifted to television as the host of General Electric Theater. During his time working for GE, Reagan became more conservative and eventually switched parties in 1962. Two years later, Reagan gave a speech in support of Barry Goldwater entitled "A Time for Choosing." Although Goldwater lost overwhelmingly to John F. Kennedy, Reagan emerged as a rising star in the Republican Party. With the support of former Vice-President Richard Nixon, Reagan was elected Governor of California in 1966.

Following his re-election as Governor in 1970, Reagan was an early front-runner for the Republican Presidential nomination in 1972. With the moderates split between Nelson Rockefeller, George Romney, and Charles H. Percy, Reagan won the nomination — once again with the support of Richard Nixon who worked behind the scenes as the Republican Party's elder statesman. As his running mate, Reagan chose 48-year-old Texas Senator George H.W. Bush in order to balance the ticket with a younger Southerner and moderate Republican. Even with Alabama Governor George Wallace running a second time as an independent candidate*, the 1972 election was a close race between Reagan and Vice-President Hubert Humphrey. Humphrey ran on the successes of the Kennedy and Johnson administrations, which had ended racial segregation, created Medicare and Medicaid, and taken humankind to the moon. Reagan ran against the economic record of LBJ and capitalized on the growing white backlash to his civil rights policies, especially forced busing. Critics charged that Reagan engaged in race-baiting by often repeating the myth of the black Chicago welfare queen who enriched herself off federal welfare policies. Humphrey responded by painting Reagan as a right-wing extremist who would abolish Medicare and Medicaid. Humphrey hoped to score a victory in the 1972 presidential debates, but Reagan seemed to brush off his opponent's criticisms while putting the early 1970s recession front and center. On election day, what began as a nail-biter ended with Reagan winning the White House with 309 electoral votes to Humphrey's 203. Wallace, who deemphasized his opposition to segregation in favor of economic issues, won only 6.8% of the vote and 26 electoral votes as many white Southerners who supported him in 1968 voted for Reagan instead.

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Reagan's coattails allowed the Republicans to win razor-thin majorities in the House and Senate. This allowed the incoming President to cut the top income tax rate from 70% to 60%, and cut spending on domestic programs. Reagan had wanted taxes to be cut down to 52%, but he accepted 60% in order to get needed support from Congressional Democrats. Reagan also increased spending on the national defense, believing that the Democrats had allowed the U.S. to fall behind the Soviets as a result of détente. Yet the tax cuts combined with new levels of defense spending wrecked America's debt and deficit: by the time Reagan left office in 1981, he had transformed America from the world's largest creditor into its largest debtor. Further, the cuts to domestic programs exacerbated the effects of a recession which began in November 1973. As unemployment numbers rose and lines to welfare offices grew, Americans blamed Reagan and the Republicans for the recession. In 1974, Democrats swept the Congressional elections and many predicted that Reagan would be a one term President.

But Reagan, to the surprise of many, compromised with the new Congress to reverse his earlier tax cuts. Additionally, his efforts to increase defense spending acted as an economic stimulant that pulled the country out of recession in 1975. Ironically, it was the Keynesian economic policies that Reagan so despised that saved the nation's economy and ultimately his own political skin. In 1976, former Vice-President Hubert Humphrey was defeated for the Democratic presidential nomination by Massachusetts Governor Robert Kennedy in a re-match of 1972. Kennedy's ally in the U.S. Senate, George McGovern of South Dakota, had authored a bill that revamped the nation's presidential nomination process so that it would be determined by the primaries instead of the party bosses. When he accepted the Democratic nomination, Kennedy tore into Reagan's economic record and cast his opponent as an out of touch Ebenezer Scrooge-type character who cared more about the rich and powerful than the everyday American. Reagan responded by touting the nation's economic recovery in ads proclaiming that 1976 was "Morning in America." In September 1976, acting on the advice of Secretary of State Richard Nixon, Reagan recognized Communist China and visited the country personally following the death of Mao Zedong. While some right-wing hawks howled, Reagan was praised for a diplomatic masterstroke that separated China from the Soviet sphere of influence. In the October 1976 debates, RFK made a fervent case against the damage caused by “Reaganonmics” while the incumbent President highlighted the economic recovery and his widely popular visit to China earlier that month. But at age 50, Kennedy’s relative youth compared to the 65-year-old Reagan proved to be a positive contrast on TV. When Reagan highlighted Kennedy’s record of high taxes and implementation of forced busing as Massachusetts’ Governor, RFK responded by calling Reagan a flip-flopper who himself raised taxes after his tax cuts failed. Most voters considered the debates a draw, with a slight edge towards Reagan. When the polls closed on November 2, 1976, Reagan was narrowly re-elected with 325 electoral votes to Kennedy’s 213.

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When Reagan was sworn in for a second term on January 20, 1977, he was forced to contend with a Democratic Congress that was hostile to his conservative economic policies. Reagan had wanted to pursue a wide-reaching tax overhaul that would lower the top income bracket to 28%, but this was blocked by Kennedy’s allies in the Democratic-controlled Senate. While the economy had left the recession in 1975, the U.S. still had to contend with an economic phenomenon known as stagflation: a combination of sluggish economic growth and high inflation. The high inflation rates of the late 1970s were due in part to the extraordinary levels of peacetime defense spending under Reagan, whose popularity once again began to take a hit. Reagan worked with Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan to reduce inflation levels in his second term. In 1974, Greenspan became the youngest Federal Reserve Chairman in history when he was appointed at the age of 48. Greenspan dramatically raised interest rates in 1978, leading to a steep recession in 1979.

The economic downturn occurred while Reagan confronted multiple obstacles in foreign policy. Reagan had already engendered controversy when Nixon helped engineer a coup that ousted Chilean President Salvador Allende and replaced him with a brutal dictatorship under Augusto Pinochet. But Reagan was less concerned with human rights than he was at suppressing potential communist uprisings, and he took the same approach in the Middle-East. In 1978, Nixon advised the Shah of Iran to respond to growing protests against his regime by violently cracking down on dissent. This further angered Iran’s population, leading to the Shah’s overthrow and exile in 1979. The Iranian Revolution resulted in the 1979 oil crisis, which produced long gas lines in the United States. Although the Shah repeatedly asked for asylum in the U.S., Nixon warned Reagan that such an action would likely lead to the taking of American hostages in Iran. Instead, Reagan arranged for the Shah to stay in the Bahamas where he died in 1980. When the Soviet Union invaded Afghanistan in 1979, Reagan authorized Operation Cyclone which provided arms and CIA training to religious fundamentalists who fought the Soviets as guerillas. This strengthened Afghan resistance to the Soviet invaders, but it also contributed to the rise of Islamic fundamentalism and the establishment of the Taliban in the 1990s.

By 1980, with gas lines growing longer and more Americans being put out of work everyday, the country was ready for change. Although he had narrowly lost in 1976, the 54-year-old Robert F. Kennedy remained the Democratic Party’s most charismatic and respected figure. In his third run for the Presidency, Kennedy won the Democratic nomination a second time and he selected Georgia Senator Sam Nunn as his running mate. Much like his brother had done in 1960, RFK promised to get America moving again by stimulating the weak economy. But Kennedy also held idiosyncratic views like tax benefits to inner city businesses (which he hoped would boost urban development) that made him appealing to many voters outside of the Democratic Party. Kennedy’s fierce criticisms of Reagan’s civil rights record made him highly popular with minority voters, especially African-Americans and Hispanics. While RFK had lost the South in 1980, he proved to be popular to unemployed Appalachians with his promise to introduce New Deal-style public works projects and provide a, “hand up, not a hand out,” instead of relying on welfare which he condemned just as forcefully as Reagan. Privately, Reagan himself believed that his own Vice-President — George Herbert Walker Bush — never stood a chance against Kennedy. The 56-year-old Bush came from a well-established New England family and had graduated Yale in 1948 before making a fortune in the Texas oil industry. Yet despite his enviable pedigree, Bush proved to be awkward on the campaign trail with his nasally voice and tendency to interrupt every other sentence with, “um,” or, “uh.” While the 6’2’’ Bush towered over the 5’9’’ Kennedy, it was RFK who came across as the bigger man on the debate stage with his powerful attacks on Reagan’s economic record. Responding to Bush’s assertions that he was an “Ivy League elitist” because of his family’s wealth and Harvard degree, Kennedy charged Bush with naked hypocrisy. After all, Bush himself was the son of a millionaire Senator from Connecticut and a legacy student at Yale. Kennedy contrasted himself with Bush by saying, 'both the Vice-President and I were raised in households sheltered by all the privileges afforded by economic wealth and family pedigree. Our fathers made fortunes on Wall Street, while his father became a U.S. Senator and mine became a U.S. Ambassador. The essential difference between the diverging paths that we took as men is that Vice-President Bush uses his social status to make hypocritical personal attacks on political opponents while ignoring the needs of a destitute and desperate people, but I use the influence afforded by my family to advocate for the dispossessed and all those without a voice in Ronald Reagan’s America.'

The debates were widely considered a victory for Kennedy, and Bush struggled to close the gap. His campaign was dealt a fatal blow when Reagan was asked at a press conference what he thought of a recent report that former President John F. Kennedy was so affected by Addison’s Disease that he was being forced to use a wheelchair. Reagan quipped**, ”I’m not going to pick on an invalid.” This drew audible gasps from the press corps, and soon newspapers were filled with headlines like, “REAGAN CALLS AILING JFK ‘AN INVALID.” Kennedy’s poll numbers jumped five points as a result. While Reagan apologized, the damage was done. On election day 1980, Kennedy defeated Bush in a landslide with 377 electoral votes to Bush’s 161.

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Reagan left office at the age of 69 and retired to his ranch in California. He occasionally made public statements criticizing Robert F. Kennedy’s policies and was a regular speaker at the 1984, 1988, and 1992 Republican conventions. Despite his remarks about JFK, he attended the former President’s funeral in October 1982. When Reagan was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease in 1994, he all but retired from public life for the next ten years until he died in 2004. In historical surveys of U.S. Presidents, Reagan is ranked near the middle. He is credited with pulling America out of the 1975 recession by compromising with Democrats to raise taxes and pouring billions of dollars into defense spending, but he is also blamed for the severity of the recession as well as the 1979-81 recession that followed it. His visit to China and surprise comeback victory in 1976 are well-regarded, but his policies toward Chile, Iran, and Afghanistan are generally considered to be disastrous. Today, most conservatives view Jack Kemp — who served as President from 1993 to 2001 — as a more successful proponent of the conservative economic and foreign policies that Reagan attempted in the 1970s."

*Due to butterflies, Wallace is not shot in 1972.
**Reagan actually said this about Dukakis in 1988.
 
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Interesting that the Democrats nominate Lincoln's VP.
He pretty much was a democrat, only southern politician who stayed loyal and therefore was picked as the "unity" candidate with the war coming to a close (a powerless fig leaf to give the returning south "a say" in government while being sat on). Of course then Lincoln got shot and suddenly a southern racist was in charge, that helped derail reconstruction and you all know the rest.
 
Interesting that the Democrats nominate Lincoln's VP.
He pretty much was a democrat, only southern politician who stayed loyal and therefore was picked as the "unity" candidate with the war coming to a close (a powerless fig leaf to give the returning south "a say" in government while being sat on). Of course then Lincoln got shot and suddenly a southern racist was in charge, that helped derail reconstruction and you all know the rest.
My reasoning for picking Johnson is that without his very unpopular presidency he is seen as a uniting candidate in a way, through him being a Southerner, a War Democrat and his connections to Lincoln, but he has a Copperhead from the North as his running mate to balance the ticket. Johnson is also picked due to his later critiques of the Lincoln administration on things such as the 14th and 15th amendments, though these in hindsight would prove to be very unpopular positions.
 
Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – February 26, 1887) was an American lawyer and statesman who served as the 16th president of the United States from 1861 until 1869. Lincoln led the nation through the American Civil War, the country's greatest moral, cultural, constitutional, and political crisis. He succeeded in preserving the Union, aiding Reconstruction, abolishing slavery, bolstering the federal government, and modernizing the U.S. economy.
If Lincoln survived, would Jim Crow laws still exist in the south?
Quick edit: I saw the part where the African-Americans are resettled in the Indian Territory, was gonna ask if they got the 40 acres and mule as promised.
 
Last edited:
True wide awakes ib.png


The "True Wide Awakes" were a socio-political and paramilitary organization (and later suppressed criminal organization) that split off from the Wide Awakes during the 1890s, and were suppressed in the late 1910s

The original "Wide Awakes" were a youth and paramilitary organization first established around the time of the 1860 election, to organize youth in support of Lincoln, abolitionism, and the Republican cause. In the immediate postwar era, the Wide Awakes generally aligned with the Radical Republican faction, in support of Reconstruction policies of voting and civil rights for African Americans, the establishment of public education for both freedmen and poor whites in the South (and elsewhere), land reform, and so on

As time went on, however, the Republican Party began to change, and the Wide Awakes as a whole began to shift in that same direction. While support for Radical Reconstruction was strong early on, as time passed, the voter base in the north cooled on that matter, growing tired of the spending and effort to bring the south in line, chasing a progress that seemed like an ever shifting goalpost, and in no small part for a demographic that many even in the northern Republican base didn't actually have strong feelings of equality for, particularly regarding social equality (the Republican Party had never been fully dominated by the radical abolitionist wing, after all). And as tempers cooled in the north, more and more moderates leaned in the direction of "let bygones be bygones"

Furthermore, political realignment shifted, with the Republicans as a whole cementing as a pro-business capitalist party that largely opposed government intervention into the economy outside of matters like tariffs in order to protect budding US industry. The economic side of Radical Reconstruction was perhaps to a degree enabled by the harsh feelings towards the south and never fully accepted as a good in and of itself, and fell even more out of favor as time passed. And the Republican Party shifted from being one that opposed national expansion (on account of the issue of increasing slave states) to supporting increasing American involvement abroad and engaging in imperial ventures to secure resources and aid American/business interests

These factors left many in the remnant faction of Radical Republicans very dejected. They had often joined the Party and its organizations out of a strong sense of idealism and altruism, and saw it moving in the direction of abandoning various ideals, embracing a deeply flawed status quo, and embracing various exploitations. More establishment-oriented members would push back, saying that things had gotten more complicated but the Party still stood for good - there had been some unfortunate incidents in the American Congo, for example, but the Americans were uplifting a very backwards people, the suppression of the labor movement and avoidance of government intervention to help the poor may look bad but actually helped grow the economy faster and lift everyone up, the embrace of the 'lily-white' faction in the south looked like a retreat on civil rights but that was failing anyway and the 'lily-white' strategy gave the party hope to rebuild in the face of Redeemers and have a shot at trying again and shifting on civil rights once it had reestablished power in the south, the embrace of the old ex-Know Nothing stance on immigration was a mere temporary political expediency, and so on. The Party still wanted to fight the fires of the world - but fighting fires had become more complicated and ambiguous, and the Party sometimes needed the Wide Awakes to fight fire with fire and get dirty to do good, after all, they'd say...

But such rhetoric didn't do much to ease the consciences of the more Radical wing. In part due to the growth of various anti-establishment movements like the labor, suffrage, socialist and populist movements (and some state and local successes for some such movements) and in part due to a complex, convoluted web of interpersonal tensions and conflicts among high-level individuals among the organization, a schism would break out among the Wide Awakes in 1892. The radical wing split off, forming the so-called "True Wide Awakes" (also officially calling themselves "Vera Fēicháng Dúisigh", the same term with Italian, Chinese, and Irish words, as a sort of show of solidarity with the immigrants of those ethnicities facing racist nativist opposition at the time), and (along with some other elements of the old Radical Republicans) supporting Weaver's third party populist campaign, which ended up getting nearly 13% of the vote. The True Wide Awakes managed to grow sizably as an organization during the next 25 years, with a membership of a few hundred thousand and having some influence in the progressive era

The late 1910s, however, saw a sharp shift of American politics away from the progressive era. During the Red Scare, many progressive, reformist, unionist, and other groups for change saw themselves being demonized and painted as communists, anarchists, and terrorists. Before, the True Wide Awakes and the original they split from were rivals, but largely peaceful ones. But by 1919, after years of resentment over the group that split from them, the Wide Awakes had taken to attacking their rivals in the streets. And in late 1919, as Palmer Raids and Red Scare suppressions, the True Wide Awakes were officially banned, with many of their ranks arrested. In the course of just a little over a year, they'd gone from a sizable organization to falling completely out of power, a microcosm of sorts for the progressive era as a whole

The history of the True Wide Awakes didn't fully end there, however. Even after the banning and legal suppression, a holdout remnant faction remained in existence, ostensibly supporting the same ideals as before. The character of the remnant is difficult to fully understand due to the lack of official sources and the propaganda surrounding both sides. More recent revisionist historians have pointed out that the accusations of terrorism were largely overblown, and have pointed to various acts of charity and mutual aid the remnant engaged in, such as supporting struggling persons during the 1920s farming crisis and during the great depression, as well as the role of certain True Wide Awake scientists in the third agricultural revolution. On the other hand, the countercultural narrative of the remnant as some sort of pure and romantic robin hood appear slanted as well - despite members calling themselves "volunteers", the True Wide Awake remnants faced such major personnel shortages once banned that they would at times resort to duress, cult-like tactics, and even instances of child recruits and kidnapping in order to fill their ranks

Around 1960 (the precise dates and details are still classified), the United States government received reports (potentially from Original Wide Awakes or True Wide Awake defectors - the two groups remained in low level conflict for decades) of a True Wide Awakes hideout in the Mortmain Mountains. The government raided the compound, and this along with contemporaneous raids on other True Wide Awakes hideouts effectively spelled the end of the organization on any organized level (though the refusal to declassify the information regarding the raids has fueled a number of conspiracy theories, ranging from those suggesting that the True Wide Awakes were all extrajudicially massacred or that some or many escaped to continue the organization even more covertly, to those suggesting that the raid was successful and found evidence of a massive terrorism plot planned by the organization aided by the Soviet Union

After that point, the True Wide Awakes largely disappear from history, though there's occasionally theories and reports of questionable reliability of remnants continuing into the present day, and recent scholarship has suggested that some remnants did at least survive into the early 1960s, and with remnant/ex-members potentially assisting scientist Norman Borlaug's research and having key roles in the development of treatments that ended the early 1960s fungal pandemic

...VFD from Daniel Handler's A Series of Unfortunate Events-an old children's book series.
 
Using this as inspiration, I made my own version

View attachment 656854
Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – February 26, 1887) was an American lawyer and statesman who served as the 16th president of the United States from 1861 until 1869. Lincoln led the nation through the American Civil War, the country's greatest moral, cultural, constitutional, and political crisis. He succeeded in preserving the Union, aiding Reconstruction, abolishing slavery, bolstering the federal government, and modernizing the U.S. economy.

Lincoln was born into poverty in a log cabin and was raised on the frontier primarily in Indiana. He was self-educated and became a lawyer, Whig Party leader, Illinois state legislator, and U.S. Congressman from Illinois. In 1849, he returned to his law practice but became vexed by the opening of additional lands to slavery as a result of the Kansas–Nebraska Act. He reentered politics in 1854, becoming a leader in the new Republican Party, and he reached a national audience in the 1858 debates against Stephen Douglas. Lincoln ran for President in 1860, sweeping the North in victory. Pro-slavery elements in the South equated his success with the North's rejection of their right to practice slavery, and southern states began seceding from the union. To secure its independence, the new Confederate States fired on Fort Sumter, a U.S. fort in the South, and Lincoln called up forces to suppress the rebellion and restore the Union.

Lincoln, a moderate Republican, had to navigate a contentious array of factions with friends and opponents from both the Democratic and Republican parties. War Democrats rallied a large faction of former opponents into his moderate camp, but they were countered by Radical Republicans, who demanded harsh treatment of the Southern Confederates. Anti-war Democrats (called "Copperheads") despised Lincoln, and irreconcilable pro-Confederate elements plotted his assassination. He managed the factions by exploiting their mutual enmity, by carefully distributing political patronage, and by appealing to the American people. His Gettysburg Address became a historic clarion call for nationalism, republicanism, equal rights, liberty, and democracy. Lincoln scrutinized the strategy and tactics in the war effort, including the selection of generals and the naval blockade of the South's trade. He suspended habeas corpus, and he averted British intervention by defusing the Trent Affair. He engineered the end to slavery with his Emancipation Proclamation and his order that the Army protect and recruit former slaves. He also encouraged border states to outlaw slavery, and promoted the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which outlawed slavery across the country.

Lincoln managed his own successful re-election campaign. He oversaw the end of the Civil War at Appomattox on April 9, 1865. On the evening of April 14, 1865, he attended Ford's theatre, near the White House in Washington D.C., where an assassination attempt by John Wilkes Booth took place, however Lincoln's bodyguard tackled Booth before he could fire at Lincoln, saving the president's life.

Using the political capital from the assassination attempt, Lincoln led a political crusade to gain public support for the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment. The Amendment would pass congress by two-thirds majorities and would be ratified officially on December 18, 1865. Lincoln then pushed for the passage of the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments, which would be ratified in 1866 and 1868 respectively, both before the conclusion of his presidency. Realizing former slave owners would likely be opposed to an integrated society, Lincoln proposed a settlement policy in the Indian Territory, encouraging and promising federal funding for the settlement of the land by freed slaves, as a means of preventing destructive race riots in the still rebuilding and vitriolic South. Though criticized by some Radical Republicans, the policy was widely supported by moderate Republicans and Democrats alike.

Lincoln became a Republican once again in 1868, to campaign for General Ulysses S. Grant to be his successor as President. Lincoln's cross country tour for Grant led to the general winning a landslide victory, winning 247 of 294 electoral votes, and 54.0% of the popular vote nationwide, against Andrew Johnson, Lincoln's vice president. Lincoln left office in March of 1869 and went into a quiet retirement back in his home of Illinois. He died of natural causes in 1887 at the age of 78 years old. He is regarded as one of America's greatest presidents, generally ranked in the top three by most historians.
The man reaching out toward Booth in the famous painting apparently blamed himself for failing and lost his mind. He ended up snapping and The Shininged his family. Just a handy note on the collateral damage of world changing events 🤔
 
View attachment 657715

The "True Wide Awakes" were a socio-political and paramilitary organization (and later suppressed criminal organization) that split off from the Wide Awakes during the 1890s, and were suppressed in the late 1910s

The original "Wide Awakes" were a youth and paramilitary organization first established around the time of the 1860 election, to organize youth in support of Lincoln, abolitionism, and the Republican cause. In the immediate postwar era, the Wide Awakes generally aligned with the Radical Republican faction, in support of Reconstruction policies of voting and civil rights for African Americans, the establishment of public education for both freedmen and poor whites in the South (and elsewhere), land reform, and so on

As time went on, however, the Republican Party began to change, and the Wide Awakes as a whole began to shift in that same direction. While support for Radical Reconstruction was strong early on, as time passed, the voter base in the north cooled on that matter, growing tired of the spending and effort to bring the south in line, chasing a progress that seemed like an ever shifting goalpost, and in no small part for a demographic that many even in the northern Republican base didn't actually have strong feelings of equality for, particularly regarding social equality (the Republican Party had never been fully dominated by the radical abolitionist wing, after all). And as tempers cooled in the north, more and more moderates leaned in the direction of "let bygones be bygones"

Furthermore, political realignment shifted, with the Republicans as a whole cementing as a pro-business capitalist party that largely opposed government intervention into the economy outside of matters like tariffs in order to protect budding US industry. The economic side of Radical Reconstruction was perhaps to a degree enabled by the harsh feelings towards the south and never fully accepted as a good in and of itself, and fell even more out of favor as time passed. And the Republican Party shifted from being one that opposed national expansion (on account of the issue of increasing slave states) to supporting increasing American involvement abroad and engaging in imperial ventures to secure resources and aid American/business interests

These factors left many in the remnant faction of Radical Republicans very dejected. They had often joined the Party and its organizations out of a strong sense of idealism and altruism, and saw it moving in the direction of abandoning various ideals, embracing a deeply flawed status quo, and embracing various exploitations. More establishment-oriented members would push back, saying that things had gotten more complicated but the Party still stood for good - there had been some unfortunate incidents in the American Congo, for example, but the Americans were uplifting a very backwards people, the suppression of the labor movement and avoidance of government intervention to help the poor may look bad but actually helped grow the economy faster and lift everyone up, the embrace of the 'lily-white' faction in the south looked like a retreat on civil rights but that was failing anyway and the 'lily-white' strategy gave the party hope to rebuild in the face of Redeemers and have a shot at trying again and shifting on civil rights once it had reestablished power in the south, the embrace of the old ex-Know Nothing stance on immigration was a mere temporary political expediency, and so on. The Party still wanted to fight the fires of the world - but fighting fires had become more complicated and ambiguous, and the Party sometimes needed the Wide Awakes to fight fire with fire and get dirty to do good, after all, they'd say...

But such rhetoric didn't do much to ease the consciences of the more Radical wing. In part due to the growth of various anti-establishment movements like the labor, suffrage, socialist and populist movements (and some state and local successes for some such movements) and in part due to a complex, convoluted web of interpersonal tensions and conflicts among high-level individuals among the organization, a schism would break out among the Wide Awakes in 1892. The radical wing split off, forming the so-called "True Wide Awakes" (also officially calling themselves "Vera Fēicháng Dúisigh", the same term with Italian, Chinese, and Irish words, as a sort of show of solidarity with the immigrants of those ethnicities facing racist nativist opposition at the time), and (along with some other elements of the old Radical Republicans) supporting Weaver's third party populist campaign, which ended up getting nearly 13% of the vote. The True Wide Awakes managed to grow sizably as an organization during the next 25 years, with a membership of a few hundred thousand and having some influence in the progressive era

The late 1910s, however, saw a sharp shift of American politics away from the progressive era. During the Red Scare, many progressive, reformist, unionist, and other groups for change saw themselves being demonized and painted as communists, anarchists, and terrorists. Before, the True Wide Awakes and the original they split from were rivals, but largely peaceful ones. But by 1919, after years of resentment over the group that split from them, the Wide Awakes had taken to attacking their rivals in the streets. And in late 1919, as Palmer Raids and Red Scare suppressions, the True Wide Awakes were officially banned, with many of their ranks arrested. In the course of just a little over a year, they'd gone from a sizable organization to falling completely out of power, a microcosm of sorts for the progressive era as a whole

The history of the True Wide Awakes didn't fully end there, however. Even after the banning and legal suppression, a holdout remnant faction remained in existence, ostensibly supporting the same ideals as before. The character of the remnant is difficult to fully understand due to the lack of official sources and the propaganda surrounding both sides. More recent revisionist historians have pointed out that the accusations of terrorism were largely overblown, and have pointed to various acts of charity and mutual aid the remnant engaged in, such as supporting struggling persons during the 1920s farming crisis and during the great depression, as well as the role of certain True Wide Awake scientists in the third agricultural revolution. On the other hand, the countercultural narrative of the remnant as some sort of pure and romantic robin hood appear slanted as well - despite members calling themselves "volunteers", the True Wide Awake remnants faced such major personnel shortages once banned that they would at times resort to duress, cult-like tactics, and even instances of child recruits and kidnapping in order to fill their ranks

Around 1960 (the precise dates and details are still classified), the United States government received reports (potentially from Original Wide Awakes or True Wide Awake defectors - the two groups remained in low level conflict for decades) of a True Wide Awakes hideout in the Mortmain Mountains. The government raided the compound, and this along with contemporaneous raids on other True Wide Awakes hideouts effectively spelled the end of the organization on any organized level (though the refusal to declassify the information regarding the raids has fueled a number of conspiracy theories, ranging from those suggesting that the True Wide Awakes were all extrajudicially massacred or that some or many escaped to continue the organization even more covertly, to those suggesting that the raid was successful and found evidence of a massive terrorism plot planned by the organization aided by the Soviet Union

After that point, the True Wide Awakes largely disappear from history, though there's occasionally theories and reports of questionable reliability of remnants continuing into the present day, and recent scholarship has suggested that some remnants did at least survive into the early 1960s, and with remnant/ex-members potentially assisting scientist Norman Borlaug's research and having key roles in the development of treatments that ended the early 1960s fungal pandemic

...VFD from Daniel Handler's A Series of Unfortunate Events-an old children's book series.
Great stuff.

The world is quiet here.
 
Yep.
The discoverers are the people currently looking for it.
Neat! I remember a Brian Lumley short story where it turned out Planet 9 was Yuggoth. It was twice the size of Jupiter, spun so fast it had an oblong shape, had a bunch of weird moons and an orbit perpendicular to the rest of the solar system.
 
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