Alternate Wikipedia Infoboxes VI (Do Not Post Current Politics or Political Figures Here)

For one of my favorite modern American heroes: Colin Powell
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The 2000 United States presidential election was held on November 3, 2000. Republican candidate Colin Powell, the former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and one of the commanders of American forces during the Gulf War, defeated Democratic Vice President Al Gore of Tennessee. Colin Powell became the first African-American and first Vietnam War veteran to become President of the United States.

Vice President Al Gore secured the nomination with no serious opposition, while General Colin Powell fought Texas Governor George W. Bush, son of former President George Bush, in a close primary. Powell would secure the nomination after a series of victories following Super Tuesday and selected Wisconsin Governor Tommy Thompson as his running mate. Vice President Gore selected Florida Senator Bob Graham as his running mate.

Both major-party candidates focused primarily on domestic issues, such as the budget, tax relief, and reforms for federal social insurance programs, although foreign policy was not ignored. Due to President Bill Clinton's sex scandal with Monica Lewinsky and subsequent impeachment, Gore avoided campaigning with Clinton. Republicans denounced Clinton's indiscretions, while Gore criticized Bush's lack of experience. On election night, Powell swept the northeast, the midwest, and the west, while Gore held onto the southeast. Powell received 55,000,000 votes and 384 electoral votes against Gore's 46,000,000 votes and 153 electoral votes. Powell flipped 18 states that had voted Democratic in 1996: Arizona, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Iowa, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Vermont, and Washington. Despite this, Gore managed to flip Georgia from Republican to Democrat. Colin Powell became the third president to win the presidency despite losing his home state, however he would flip New York in 2004.
I wonder how well Colin Powell did with the African American vote. I mean, even if Powell is African American, he probably won't win that vote, but he'd probably do a lot better than most Republicans.

I wonder who runs against him in 2004.
 
I wonder how well Colin Powell did with the African American vote. I mean, even if Powell is African American, he probably won't win that vote, but he'd probably do a lot better than most Republicans.

I wonder who runs against him in 2004.
I’d say he’d get roughly 25-30% of the black vote. A lot of African-Americans stick to the Democrats, but I think a sizable chunk would break Republican to elect the first black president.
 
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Dunwich is a large town in the county of Suffolk in England. Since the Anglo-Saxon period, it has been one of Suffolk's largest and most significant towns along with Ipswich and Bury St Edmunds; it was the capital of the Kingdom of the East Angles until it was conquered by the Danes around 870. While its political and possible ecclesiastical (since it is possible, though hard to confirm, that Dunwich was the place known as Dommoc, the seat of the Anglo-Saxon bishops) significance declined after the end of Anglo-Saxon rule, the town did continue to grow by establishing itself as a major North Sea port.

In the Domesday Book, Dunwich is recorded as having a population of around 3000 and three churches, but in the following centuries, it would grow into one of the most prominent international ports in England and Suffolk's second-largest town behind the county town, Ipswich. A rivalry of sorts between the two, comparable to that between cities like Liverpool and Manchester or Bradford and Leeds, is a commonly-noted cultural fixture, which is particularly reflected by the fans of Dunwich and Ipswich football clubs.

At its height, Dunwich was comparable to London in terms of the international significance of its docks, though this status has steadily declined since about the 13th century, particularly with the rise of London's docks and other port towns like Liverpool, Plymouth and Portsmouth. While it enjoyed a resurgence in its fortunes in the late 19th and early 20th centuries as tourism emerged and the construction of Dunwich station and the Dunwich Pier turned it into a seaside town, it was subject to considerable urban decay in the latter half of the 20th century and the Dunwich Pier has steadily declined as a tourist attraction since the 1950s.

Despite this, its political significance was enough that it was granted a borough constituency in the House of Commons in 1298, which it has retained to this day, one of the oldest parliamentary constituencies still in existence. Historically a marginal constituency between Labour and the Conservatives, since 2010 it has been represented by Conservative Norman Brooks, though Labour held it prior to 2010 as they did the nearby Ipswich and Waveney seats.

Until 2019, Dunwich also had its own borough council (and prior to that was an urban district of the county of East Suffolk), which covered a slightly larger area of the Suffolk coast than the town itself and was more friendly to the Conservatives than the parliamentary constituency. However, as part of local government reforms, the borough council was merged with Waveney District Council and Suffolk Coastal District Council to form East Suffolk District Council, a rather contentious plan among local residents as it was seen as diluting the local government influence of Dunwich's residents. The 2019 elections saw only two Conservative councillors retain their seats in the former borough council's area, though Brooks had no trouble holding his seat at the 2019 snap election held that December.

Something which sets Dunwich apart from its fellow coastal towns, however, is that it has not only retained its container shipping industry (taking a slightly larger share than the smaller port of Felixstowe), but also remains one of the only British passenger ferry ports still active on the North Sea coast along with Harwich, Hull and Newcastle. Ferry services run between Dunwich and IJmuiden in the Netherlands, Wilhelmshaven in Germany and Kristiansand in Norway (the latter being the only ferry connection between the UK and a non-EU member). Prior to the Brexit vote, there were allegedly plans for Dunwich to continue the services to Esbjerg in Denmark that Harwich ran prior to late 2014, but these have apparently been abandoned.

(This is a bit of a weird idea I've lowkey had in my head since I went to Dunwich on holiday about 18 months ago, but I only just wrote it all down.)
 
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The 2004 United States presidential election was the 55th quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 2, 2004. The incumbent Republican President Colin Powell and his running mate Vice President Tommy Thompson were overwhelmingly elected to a second term, defeating the Democratic ticket of Howard Dean, the Governor of Vermont and his running mate Dick Gephardt, the House Minority Leader from Missouri. President Powell managed to win 47 states, the largest landslide victory since Ronald Reagan's victory in 1984.

Powell and Thompson were renominated with no serious primary challengers. Due to Powell's strong popularity, many leading contenders for the Democratic nomination declined to run, namely Massachusetts Senator John Kerry and New York Senator and former First Lady Hillary Clinton. Howard Dean, the Governor of Vermont, emerged as the front-runner in the primaries and secured the nomination after Super Tuesday. Dean selected Dick Gephardt, another contender for the Democratic nomination, as his running mate.

Powell had remained a largely popular president following the September 11th terrorist attacks and peaked at close to 90% in the week following. Polls conducted throughout 2004 showed President Powell's averaged approval rating of 63% and a disapproval rating of 32% among all citizens. Foreign policy was the dominant issue of this election, focusing on Powell's War on Terror and the ongoing War in Afghanistan. Powell ran on a strong economy and portrayed himself as a decisive leader. Dean ran as a political outsider and criticized the Powell administration's interventionism and economic policies. Domestic issues that were debated included the economy, healthcare, same-sex marriage, and stem-cell research. Dean, not only plagued by President Powell's popularity, suffered from several gaffes, namely the infamous Dean scream during the Democratic primaries. Many voters also took issues with his perceived extremism on many issues and viewed the more moderate Powell as a safer alternative.

Powell won by a large margin of 494 electoral votes and won 56.5% of the popular vote. Dean held onto three states: Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and his home state of Vermont, which had voted for Powell in the previous election. Powell won by the largest margin since fellow Republican Ronald Reagan's landslide reelection in 1984 and won the largest vote share in history up to that point. Powell also managed to win close to 40% of the black vote nationally, while winning every other racial group.
 
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A repentant George Wallace on his death bed is ISOT'd into his 1958 self, with only one goal in mind: redemption.
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George Corley Wallace Jr. (August 25, 1919 – September 13, 1998) was a member of the Alabama House of Representatives and a vocal civil rights activist from 1958 until his death in 1998. He is best remembered for his use of populism in an attempt to get poor southern whites on the side of Civil Rights (whether he really succeeded or not, is still relatively debated today), his support for the spread of AFL-CIO influence in the south, and for his advocacy for use of non-violence in protest, inspired by his Christian beliefs. Wallace worked with various Civil Rights leaders, mainly Martin Luther King Jr. and Myles Horton. Wallace also participated in marches for desegregation, the abolition of poll taxes, labor rights, and other basic civil rights.

Born in Clio, Alabama, Wallace attended the University of Alabama School of Law and served in the United States Army Air Corps during World War II. After the war, he won election to the Alabama House of Representatives and served as a state judge. Wallace sought the Democratic nomination in the 1958 Alabama gubernatorial election. Initially a moderate on racial issues, Wallace adopted a hard-line integrationist stance after losing the 1958 nomination. Wallace would later be quoted when asked if he would ever run for Governor again he simply responded by saying "Maybe in another life, but I have more important things to attend to". He gained national notoriety when he held a speech outside the University of Alabama that attacked Governor Bull Connor for his resistance to integration and for his brutal treatment of African-Americans who protested.

Wallace endorsed Lyndon Johnson for President, which initially baffled fellow Civil Rights activists, but later paid off when LBJ signed the Civil Rights Act in 1964, though he would renounce his support when the President intervened in the Vietnam War. Also at this time, Wallace would help organize one of the three Selma to Montgomery marches. In the late 1960s, Wallace would shift his opposition to other issues as well, like poverty, as mentioned before, the Vietnam War, and really any forms of violence. In 1968 while meeting with MLK, white-supremacist James Earl Ray shot Wallace (though he intended to shoot King). The assassination attempt would leave Wallace paralyzed from the waist down for the rest of his life. Wallace is credited with saving the life of King.

Wallace would retire to his homestead in 1980, ending his campaigning. Though he would continue to be outspoken in his views. After his retirement, Wallace befriended Reverend Jesse Jackson and would endorse the man when he ran for President. However, Wallace grew increasingly more conservative in his voting patterns and said in the last interview before his death, that he had voted for Bob Dole, stating "He's a good man. His wife is a born-again Christian woman and I believe he is, too." In the last years of his life, Wallace suffered from deafness and Parkinson's disease. Wallace would pass away on September 13, 1998. Even as of today, he is hailed as a Civil Rights hero.


I see that he told his wife about her illness ITTL... Did he ever express regret for that one OTL?
 
President Bill Clinton had just won reelection. The economy was thriving. The Cold War was over. Truly, Americans had never had it so good.

Then it was all tragically cut short.

President Clinton and the First Lady had arrived in Manila ahead of the 1996 APEC summit. There were several security concerns ahead of the meeting. A bomb had been found mere days before near the summit site, and the State Department issued a security alert for U.S. citizens in the Philippines. Very little attention, however, was given.

It was early in the evening when the report came for most Americans. The first reports of an explosion and a bridge collapse near the APEC meeting site dominated the cable news channels. What followed was what seemed like a very long period of uncertainty. A sudden string of breaking news alerts followed the situation in Manila, but nothing was clear. Was the president involved? Was the president safe? Are there any casualties? Will the APEC summit still go ahead? Until, at around 8:00pm, EST, the official confirmation came through.

"We have now received the official confirmation from Manila: President William Jefferson Clinton, and First Lady Hillary Clinton, died today at 18:30, Eastern Standard Time, 7:30 AM Philippine Time. He was 50, she was 49. Vice President Gore, presumably, will be taking the oath of office to become the 43rd president." - Dan Rather, CBS News

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"I, Albert Arnold Gore, do solemnly swear that I will faithfully execute the Office of President of the United States, and will to the best of my ability, preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States. So help me God." - Al Gore​

After a chaotic situation between Manila and Washington, President Gore sat in the White House's situation room, the most powerful office in the world thrust upon him. An investigation would be ordered immediately, but it didn't take long for the perpetrators to emerge. No group had claimed responsibility yet, but CIA director John Deutch told the president that intelligence determined that the assassination was masterminded by Saudi terrorist Osama bin Laden, leader of the Islamist terror group al-Qaeda. Mere months before, bin Laden had declared a 'holy war' against the United States. Now, he had struck at the head of the U.S. government.

It was a day that shook the world. The news talked of the act of war; a new day of infamy. The frontpage of The New York Times was simply a picture of President Clinton and the First Lady below President Gore's words: "We, as a nation, have bore witness to an unspeakable tragedy. This act of terror was intended to sow chaos in our nation and our government. They did not, and will never, succeed." The assassination had a rather significant impact on entertainment media, with several films being edited. The upcoming film Mars Attacks! was postponed due to a scene showing the death of a fictionalized U.S. president portrayed by Jack Nicholson. The entire nation was in a state of shock, and some anger.

With a monumental task ahead of him, President Gore had to unify the country. The main task was preparing to bring those responsible to justice, and that's what the President vowed to do with the duty bestowed upon him. However, there was still one large hurdle to overcome. A constitutional crisis in the making. President Clinton had been reelected, but he had not been elected by the Electoral College yet.

It was assumed that most Democratic electors would switch their vote to Gore, but that was easier said than done. Some state laws limited the ability of electors to change their vote, and already the court battles were beginning. The last time a presidential candidate died between election day and the electoral college vote was 1872, when losing candidate Horace Greeley died and his electoral votes were scattered among different candidates. Clinton, of course, was no Greeley. The fact that Clinton was an incumbent only made things worse. Inevitably, partisan politics quickly made a return.

Once the nation was over the initial shock, the White House looked for a suitable Vice President to replace Gore on the ticket. A shortlist was released in December, ranging of candidates from congress, governor's mansions, even the military. Even Republicans appeared on this list, including Bob Dole, the man Clinton had defeated only a month ago. But time was running out. Former Clinton campaign representatives were now embroiled in a Supreme Court battle over the legality of electors breaking their pledges. Speaker Newt Gingrich was even advised on the potential of his own succession to the presidency should the electoral college vote be invalidated. Eventually, most electors were allowed to change their vote without penalty, owing to the unique circumstances. The states, ultimately, could not bind electors to a deceased candidate. With the decision, the White House had finally announced Dick Gephardt as Gore's Vice Presidential choice, with only a couple days to spare. Regardless, some electors had interpreted the long wait differently and were publicly supporting other shortlist candidates. It seemed inevitable the Vice Presidential vote was bound for pandemonium.

Gore and Gephardt were now, officially, president-elect and VP-elect. The results were certified by president pro tempore Strom Thurmond in a joint session of congress. Sure, there were a lot of faithless electors that voted against this days old ticket, be it for a variety of reasons: an act of protest against the electoral college or even against the ticket itself. In this situation, it was bound to happen. Luckily for the country, the new Gore-Gephardt ticket had far more than a majority, as expected with the crisis facing America.

With the President receiving authorization for use of military force from Congress, it was clear what was next. Osama bin Laden was now the U.S.'s most wanted fugitive. A man not just responsible for the deaths of the president and first lady, but also the deaths of many hundreds of civilians throughout the world. U.S. intelligence had even seen reason to link him to the 1993 World Trade Center bombings. With the stroke of a pen, President Gore had authorized the arrest or assassination of bin Laden.

But the American people demanded answers. Why was security not sufficient enough? Impassioned speeches by senators and representatives urged the need for a quick and rightful response. Previously viewed as alarmists, the CIA's Bin Laden Unit was finally achieving results. Thanks to the defection of al-Qaeda militant Jamal al-Fadl, the CIA had a full map of al-Qaeda's reach and intentions throughout the globe. As for the whereabouts of bin Laden, he was able to flee from his base in Sudan to Afghanistan, now under Taliban rule and quickly becoming a terrorist safe haven. This was despite U.S. pressure on the Sudanese government to hand him over, before President Clinton's assassination. The Taliban had captured Kabul earlier in the year, proclaiming their 'Islamic Emirate', a mostly unrecognized state. Having explored all options, including a risky CIA plan to capture the al-Qaeda leader, President Gore issued a simple ultimatum to the Taliban: surrender bin Laden and his associates, expel al-Qaeda, or we will have no choice but to seek justice ourselves. The Taliban, predictably, refused.


In January 1997, after applying pressure to Pakistan and other Taliban supporters in the Afghanistan region, the United States initiated Operation Shining Light. President Gore announced the commencement of operations in Afghanistan in an Oval Office address to the nation. In the coming months, President Gore would also announce the creation of a joint Philippine-U.S. task force to combat Islamist forces stationed in the country, such as al-Qaeda and Abu Sayyaf. President Clinton's assassination has certainly changed the course of U.S. history. Political pundits are already referring to the new U.S. military campaigns as a 'war on terrorism', a term the administration discourages.
Interesting scenario here with Gore taking over after an election
 
I've finally learned how to use Inkscape.

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I wanted to do more with this, but just making the box, and crunching the numbers, and getting it to look presentable sapped all the interest I had. For now. I just want to know if the electoral map looks clean, like a real one on Wikipedia.
 
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The 2004 United States presidential election was the 55th quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 2, 2004. The incumbent Republican President Colin Powell and his running mate Vice President Tommy Thompson were overwhelmingly elected to a second term, defeating the Democratic ticket of Howard Dean, the Governor of Vermont and his running mate Dick Gephardt, the House Minority Leader from Missouri. President Powell managed to win 47 states, the largest landslide victory since Ronald Reagan's victory in 1984.

Powell and Thompson were renominated with no serious primary challengers. Due to Powell's strong popularity, many leading contenders for the Democratic nomination declined to run, namely Massachusetts Senator John Kerry and New York Senator and former First Lady Hillary Clinton. Howard Dean, the Governor of Vermont, emerged as the front-runner in the primaries and secured the nomination after Super Tuesday. Dean selected Dick Gephardt, another contender for the Democratic nomination, as his running mate.

Powell had remained a largely popular president following the September 11th terrorist attacks and peaked at close to 90% in the week following. Polls conducted throughout 2004 showed President Powell's averaged approval rating of 63% and a disapproval rating of 32% among all citizens. Foreign policy was the dominant issue of this election, focusing on Powell's War on Terror and the ongoing War in Afghanistan. Powell ran on a strong economy and portrayed himself as a decisive leader. Dean ran as a political outsider and criticized the Powell administration's interventionism and economic policies. Domestic issues that were debated included the economy, healthcare, same-sex marriage, and stem-cell research. Dean, not only plagued by President Powell's popularity, suffered from several gaffes, namely the infamous Dean scream during the Democratic primaries. Many voters also took issues with his perceived extremism on many issues and viewed the more moderate Powell as a safer alternative.

Powell won by a large margin of 494 electoral votes and won 56.5% of the popular vote. Dean held onto three states: Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and his home state of Vermont, which had voted for Powell in the previous election. Powell won by the largest margin since fellow Republican Ronald Reagan's landslide reelection in 1984 and won the largest vote share in history up to that point. Powell also managed to win close to 40% of the black vote nationally, while winning every other racial group.
Colin Powell must be doing a pretty good job as president if he's winning by Nixon 1972 or Reagan 1984 margins.

I do wonder though how close the margins in the states Howard Dean won. I mean, Powell had previously won Vermont in 2000 but it swung to Dean for obvious reasons (Vermonters are very loyal to their native sons/daughters).
 
I've finally learned how to use Inkscape.

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I wanted to do more with this, but just making the box, and crunching the numbers, and getting it to look presentable sapped all the interest I had. For now. I just want to know if the electoral map looks clean, like a real one on Wikipedia.

I wonder if the Democrats would blame the dixiecrats for Truman's loss and then banish them? Could it perhaps lead to a semi-permanent dixiecrat party?
 
The cast was as follows:

Superman/Clark Kent: Christopher Reeve

Lex Luthor: Anthony Hopkins

Pa Kent: Hal Holbrook

Perry White: Robert Stack

Lois Lane: Meryl Streep

Ma Kent: June Allyson

John Corben: Christopher Walken
(does not become Metallo in this film)

Jimmy Olsen: Mark Hamill

Lena Thorul: Barbara Rhoades

Kristen Wells: Carrie Fisher
(small, but important part as it sets up the story for the sequel)

In case, you were wondering why Coppola was making Superman instead of Apocalypse Now. He had already made in 1971. It this movie's lack of success that lead to the Godfather, instead of our timeline's THX-1138.
Also, the murder mystery aspects of what became Annie Hall work in TTL. So, instead of reviving romantic comedies, we see Woody Allen reinvent the screwball comedy.
As a bonus, we see Smokey and the Bandit as it was initended, a Jerry Reed vehicle.

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Other films in this series:
1975: Jaws
1976: Flash Gordon
1976: Buck Rogers

1977: The Legend of King Kong
Are these part of your TV TL?
 
I wonder if the Democrats would blame the dixiecrats for Truman's loss and then banish them? Could it perhaps lead to a semi-permanent dixiecrat party?

Way too big of a Republican win for that. It'd have to be a case where both Truman and Stassen had like 48% of the vote each, and Stassen won something like Virginia or Tennessee by a plurality, and those states somehow were the tipping point for Stassen.
 
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