Alternate Wikipedia Infoboxes V (Do Not Post Current Politics Here)

Crossposting from my new(ish) timeline, Novus Ordo Seclorum: The Age of Empires Reborn (the world my Albionic Church is from). These are the presidential triumvirates of the United Empire of Columbia from 1836 to the present.

In case you can't tell, I've gone insane. How else can you explain a universe that has a political party Kim Jong-il (considerably less totalitarian ITTL), Ronald Reagan, and Barack Obama all belong to?

 
2018 Georgia House of Delegates Elections
2018 Georgia House Elections.png

In 2018, the Dixie State of Georgia held elections for all 150 members of its House of Delegates, the lower chamber of the Georgia State Legislature. In the elections, the incumbent Unionist-SDP coalition widened their majority to keep control of the chamber. The Unionists + SDP was able to outrun President Mitch Landrieu by 6 percentage points as he was winning the state in the 2018 Presidential Election.

The National Party led by Bob Barr (N- Roswell) remained in the minority despite winning the largest number of seats of any party in the state and only picked up one seat in this election cycle, the 31st district from the Unionists in a 2016 special election, which was then won back by the Unionists in 2018.

The Unionist Party led by incumbent Speaker DuBose Porter (U- Dublin) (who has been Speaker since 2012 and previously served as Speaker from 2006-2009) picked up 4 seats from the Nationals, the 31st, 43rd, 48th, and 116th.

The Social Democratic Party (SDP) led by Deputy Speaker Vincent Fort (SDP- Atlanta) picked up 2 seats in the Atlanta area, the 65th district from the Nationals and the 92nd from the Unionists, their coalition partners. The SDP now hold the most seats they have ever held in the Georgia House of Delegates and a higher percentage of seats than in any state legislative chamber in the country.

The 2018 Elections continued the dominance of the state legislature by a Unionist-SDP coalition. The Georgia State Senate, which serves six-year terms and was last elected in 2015, is also controlled by a Unionist-SDP coalition.





























2018 House Elections
2018 House Election.png



House District by Party
2018 House Party.png



House Districts #'ed
Georgia House Districts #'s.png

2018 House Elections
2nd Round Results
UnionistNationalSDP
1​
45.8%​
54.2%
0.0%​
2​
42.6%​
57.4%
0.0%​
3​
38.7%​
61.3%
0.0%​
4​
39.7%​
60.3%
0.0%​
5​
35.4%​
64.6%
0.0%​
6​
32.6%​
67.4%
0.0%​
7​
30.4%​
69.6%
0.0%​
8​
34.5%​
65.5%
0.0%​
9​
43.5%​
56.5%
0.0%​
10​
42.1%​
57.9%
0.0%​
11​
54.1%
45.9%​
0.0%​
12​
31.5%​
68.5%
0.0%​
13​
39.8%​
60.2%
0.0%​
14​
37.8%​
62.2%
0.0%​
15​
30.9%​
69.1%
0.0%​
16​
29.8%​
70.2%
0.0%​
17​
28.7%​
71.3%
0.0%​
18​
34.7%​
65.3%
0.0%​
19​
27.8%​
72.2%
0.0%​
20​
29.7%​
70.3%
0.0%​
21​
35.6%​
64.4%
0.0%​
22​
36.8%​
63.2%
0.0%​
23​
41.5%​
58.5%
0.0%​
24​
38.6%​
61.4%
0.0%​
25​
44.8%​
55.2%
0.0%​
26​
46.8%​
53.2%
0.0%​
27​
54.8%
45.2%​
0.0%​
28​
47.4%​
52.6%
0.0%​
29​
56.4%
43.6%​
0.0%​
30​
64.5%
35.5%​
0.0%​
31​
51.8%
48.2%​
0.0%​
32​
53.6%
46.4%​
0.0%​
33​
50.4%
49.6%​
0.0%​
34​
43.5%​
56.5%
0.0%​
35​
48.7%​
51.3%
0.0%​
36​
43.5%​
56.5%
0.0%​
37​
38.7%​
61.3%
0.0%​
38​
46.8%​
53.2%
0.0%​
39​
49.7%​
50.3%
0.0%​
40​
43.9%​
56.1%
0.0%​
41​
0.0%​
59.8%
40.2%​
42​
47.2%​
52.8%
0.0%​
43​
54.3%
45.7%​
0.0%​
44​
0.0%​
54.7%
45.3%​
45​
0.0%​
43.1%​
56.9%
46​
56.8%
43.2%​
0.0%​
47​
43.6%​
56.4%
0.0%​
48​
50.3%
49.7%​
0.0%​
49​
0.0%​
38.7%​
61.3%
50​
53.6%
46.4%​
0.0%​
51​
0.0%​
46.8%​
53.2%
52​
0.0%​
31.5%​
68.5%
53​
0.0%​
29.7%​
70.3%
54​
58.7%
0.0%​
41.3%​
55​
41.5%​
0.0%​
58.5%
56​
31.2%​
0.0%​
68.8%
57​
0.0%​
34.0%​
66.0%
58​
43.5%​
56.5%
0.0%​
59​
38.9%​
61.1%
0.0%​
60​
42.3%​
57.7%
0.0%​
61​
41.3%​
58.7%
0.0%​
62​
46.7%​
53.3%
0.0%​
63​
41.3%​
58.7%
0.0%​
64​
52.4%
0.0%​
47.6%​
65​
48.9%​
0.0%​
51.1%
66​
42.6%​
0.0%​
57.4%
67​
0.0%​
32.5%​
67.5%
68​
0.0%​
24.1%​
75.9%
69​
36.5%​
0.0%​
63.5%
70​
34.2%​
0.0%​
65.8%
71​
45.5%​
0.0%​
54.5%
72​
43.1%​
56.9%
0.0%​
73​
41.3%​
58.7%
0.0%​
74​
34.6%​
65.4%
0.0%​
75​
57.8%
42.2%​
0.0%​
76​
47.9%​
52.1%
0.0%​
77​
53.2%
46.8%​
0.0%​
78​
21.3%​
78.7%
0.0%​
79​
45.3%​
54.7%
0.0%​
80​
56.8%
0.0%​
43.2%​
81​
43.5%​
0.0%​
56.5%
82​
0.0%​
51.2%
48.8%​
83​
42.3%​
57.7%
0.0%​
84​
40.2%​
59.8%
0.0%​
85​
54.2%
45.8%​
0.0%​
86​
49.6%​
50.4%
0.0%​
87​
54.9%
45.1%​
0.0%​
88​
50.3%
49.7%​
0.0%​
89​
42.3%​
57.7%
0.0%​
90​
45.6%​
54.4%
0.0%​
91​
44.2%​
0.0%​
55.8%
92​
46.8%​
0.0%​
53.2%
93​
0.0%​
41.2%​
58.8%
94​
55.3%
0.0%​
44.7%​
95​
56.8%
43.2%​
0.0%​
96​
44.4%​
55.6%
0.0%​
97​
57.8%
0.0%​
42.2%​
98​
47.8%​
52.2%
0.0%​
99​
0.0%​
46.5%​
53.5%
100​
57.8%
0.0%​
42.2%​
101​
54.7%
45.3%​
0.0%​
102​
57.8%
42.2%​
0.0%​
103​
60.3%
39.7%​
0.0%​
104​
42.3%​
57.7%
0.0%​
105​
37.6%​
62.4%
0.0%​
106​
45.6%​
54.4%
0.0%​
107​
62.5%
37.5%​
0.0%​
108​
0.0%​
31.2%​
68.8%
109​
57.4%
42.6%​
0.0%​
110​
54.2%
45.8%​
0.0%​
111​
56.5%
43.5%​
0.0%​
112​
64.5%
35.5%​
0.0%​
113​
60.2%
39.8%​
0.0%​
114​
55.4%
44.6%​
0.0%​
115​
53.2%
46.8%​
0.0%​
116​
52.1%
47.9%​
0.0%​
117​
53.6%
46.4%​
0.0%​
118​
45.2%​
54.8%
0.0%​
119​
43.6%​
0.0%​
56.4%
120​
54.2%
0.0%​
45.8%​
121​
57.0%
43.0%​
0.0%​
122​
55.6%
44.4%​
0.0%​
123​
51.0%
49.0%​
0.0%​
124​
54.5%
45.5%​
0.0%​
125​
58.4%
41.6%​
0.0%​
126​
61.2%
38.8%​
0.0%​
127​
59.8%
40.2%​
0.0%​
128​
55.6%
44.4%​
0.0%​
129​
58.9%
41.1%​
0.0%​
130​
54.1%
45.9%​
0.0%​
131​
57.8%
42.2%​
0.0%​
132​
56.3%
43.7%​
0.0%​
133​
50.8%
49.2%​
0.0%​
134​
54.8%
45.2%​
0.0%​
135​
57.8%
42.2%​
0.0%​
136​
53.2%
46.8%​
0.0%​
137​
56.7%
43.3%​
0.0%​
138​
43.6%​
56.4%
0.0%​
139​
42.5%​
57.5%
0.0%​
140​
53.8%
46.2%​
0.0%​
141​
51.3%
48.7%​
0.0%​
142​
54.2%
45.8%​
0.0%​
143​
46.5%​
53.5%
0.0%​
144​
52.0%
48.0%​
0.0%​
145​
47.6%​
52.4%
0.0%​
146​
57.4%
42.6%​
0.0%​
147​
45.8%​
54.2%
0.0%​
148​
0.0%​
41.2%​
58.8%
149​
56.5%
0.0%​
43.5%​
150​
0.0%​
59.8%
40.2%​
Total​
42.5%​
44.7%​
12.8%​
 

Hillary Diane Rodham Parker (née Rodham; born October 26, 1947), commonly known as Hillary Rodham, is an American politician, diplomat, lawyer, writer, and public speaker. A Democrat, she was the first woman to be Attorney General, Secretary of State, and President of the United States.

Rodham was raised in the Chicago suburb of Park Ridge and attended Wellesley College and Yale Law School, where she met her first husband, Robert Parker. Rodham and Parker began dating in 1970. In 1972, Rodham joined the legal team investigating President Spiro Agnew's corruption scandals. She stayed on the team after Agnew left office and gained national fame for arguing before the Supreme Court. After Agnew was convicted in 1974, Rodham married Parker and moved to his native New York with him. In New York, Rodham began working for New York County District Attorney Frank Hogan. However, her time there seemed to be cut short after Hogan suffered a stroke and resigned from office. Rodham decided to run in the special election and defeated interim District Attorney Richard Kuh. She was the first woman to hold this office and became increased her national profile as a highly professional and successful prosecutor.

In 1980, she declined proposals from the state Democratic Party to run for the United States Senate, intending to run for Governor of New York in 1982 or 1986. She lost the 1982 Democratic gubernatorial primary to Mayor Mario Cuomo, and her ambitions seemed to be halted for a time. After Cuomo became governor, Rodham declined to run to succeed him as mayor. However, in late 1984, President-elect Al Gore asked Rodham to serve as his Attorney General, an offer she accepted. Rodham was confirmed after contentious hearings before the Senate Judiciary Committee, during which she receiving the strong support of freshman Senator Elizabeth Holtzman, who had been the 1980 New York Democratic nominee in her stead, marking the start of a lifelong partnership. As Attorney General, Rodham led the Gore administration's efforts in bringing an end to the "war on drugs" and the "war on crime", as well as enforcement of civil rights. Rodham sparred with the president on abortion and convinced him to take more pro-choice stances and appoint pro-choice judges. Although Rodham was something of a reformist within the Gore administration, she was still publicly seen as a member of his youthful "Moderate Mafia" that fought for control of the party against the Jackson wing.

Secretary of State George McGovern informed Gore that he did not want to continue in his position for a second term and would leave at the conclusion of the president's first term. Publicly McGovern stated that he was becoming old and wanted to retire from politics, but privately he had had one too many disagreements with Gore on foreign policy issues. McGovern felt that Gore had become too much of a Jackson-esque hawk and betrayed the promises he had made before taking office. Gore was secretly pleased to relieve McGovern of his duty as well, thinking that the old timer had tried to upstage him with public disagreements and grand international gestures. Gore decided to select Rodham, his most trusted Cabinet member, as the new Secretary of State. The announcement shocked the political circles of Washington. Many feared that a woman could not be the nation's chief diplomat. However, Rodham had a solid record as Attorney General and was friends with many members of the Democratic establishment. Ultimately, she was confirmed by the Senate and became the first female Secretary of State.

During her three years as Secretary of State, Rodham became a loyal partner in Gore's ambitions, leading denuclearization talks with the Soviet Union, pressuring South Africa on apartheid, and providing relief to Central and Latin America. While she was broadly praised for these efforts, she drew ire in other areas, particularly for antagonizing David Steel, and pursuing normalization of relations with socialist Iran. Throughout her tenure in the Gore administration, Rodham was named America's most admired woman.

As the 1992 election neared, the Democratic primary was bound to be wide open, as President Gore was term-limited and Vice President Proxmire would not run on account of his old age. George McGovern had quietly been setting up his campaign during his "retirement" and Gore informed his allies that a McGovern nomination would be a personal affront to him. Although many other Democrats would be running for the nomination, Gore and his inner circle felt none had the stature to defeat McGovern except Rodham. She initially rebuked the offer, believing that America was not ready to elect a woman president. It was an ambition of hers, but planned for later. She had considered waiting 4 or 8 years, but Gore implored her to run now. After consulting with her friend Elizabeth Holtzman, and her mentor Anne Wexler, Rodham decided to enter the race. She resigned as Secretary of State shortly before the start of the primaries.

Early in the race, McGovern was the prohibitive frontrunner, leading all the polls and securing many key endorsements. However, his campaign was upset by the sudden betrayal of McGovern's friend and former protege, Colorado Senator Gary Hart. Hart entered the race promising to unite all three factions of the Democratic Party through "trianglization" by settling between McGovern's liberalism and Gore's moderatism, and somewhere apart from the Jackson wing. Hart's youth and dynamic image ran counter to McGovern's professorial image and promises of return to old Roosevelt, Kennedy, and Humphrey style liberalism. Rodham's entry meant that McGovern was no longer the only candidate with impressive credentials.

As the primaries began, it was evident that trianglization was not effective. Moderates voted for Rodham and liberals voted for McGovern. Hart came in second or third across the nation, winning delegates but not contests, and driving his campaign into debt. Hart would eventually dropped out, but he stayed in long enough to create trouble. The primaries concluded without any candidate having a majority of delegates. McGovern had come in first in delegate count and popular vote. Hart had become a kingmaker almost entirely by accident. He privately confided to both candidates that he would give them his delegates in exchange for being made their running mate. McGovern declined, his relationship with Hart having soured too much, while Rodham hesitantly accepted. However, prior to the convention, news broke about Hart having an extramarital affair. The rumors were initially unconfirmed, but Hart would surely not be the running mate now. His delegates went to Rodham anyway and she won the nomination. McGovern was bitter but accepted his defeat quietly and graciously. As a conciliatory gesture, Rodham instead selected one of McGovern's top allies, Les AuCoin as her running mate, over other McGovernites like Walter Mondale and Paul Wellstone. McGovern, Rodham, and Gore made a grand show of party unity at the convention and Rodham went into the general election with a significant polling bump.

Her opponent was the New York businessman and sometimes friend Donald J. Trump, who promised to bring the Republican Party back to the ideals of the slain heroes Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan, not the failures of Bob Dole and George Bush. However, Trump was not well liked by the Republican establishment or many Republican voters as he had occasionally expressed liberal views on subjects like abortion. He was also dogged by questions regarding his financial dealings. Despite his policies appealing to many voters, he was never able to escape the concerns about his businesses and Rodham emerged victorious, being elected the first female president.

The historic moment was over almost as soon as it began. Rodham was immediately beset by a recession in mid-1993, ending the 10 years of prosperity that Gore had presided over. Though swift action led to the worst effects being mitigated, the effects of the recession continued to be felt after its official end in 1994. It was enough to give the Republicans their first House majority in decades. Rodham's domestic agenda was stymied as Republicans blocked legislation on abortion, education, and her signature healthcare expansion program, AHA+. Derisively referred to as "Hillarycare", AHA+ was designed to expand on the national health insurance system enacted by Hubert Humphrey and championed by Ted Kennedy, who also spearheaded this effort. As one of the few things both McGovern and Rodham agreed upon, it was a unifying policy among Democrats. However, the legislation was destroyed in the House and doomed any healthcare expansion for over a decade.

Rodham also had trouble in the foreign policy field. The Middle East was becoming even more of a boondoggle as an Israel-Palestine conflict brewed. Additionally, a new government in Iran withdrew from dialogues. As an ambitious Iraq sought to take advantage of these developments, Rodham was criticized for being weak against Saddam Hussein. The Soviet Union continued to suffer economic instability and Premier Gorbachev's position grew more tenuous.

But by far the worst thing to happen for Rodham was the death of her husband, Robert Parker. Parker joined a fact finding mission to Panama in 1994 and on the return voyage, his plane exploded on the runway. Although foul play was initially suspected, thorough investigations turned up no evidence of anything beyond simple mechanical failure. Rodham was caught in a catch-22 of sexist attacks for appearing too weak if she showed emotion and too cold if she didn't. Privately, she and their three children were extremely devastated, but she put on a brave public face and endured the ensuing criticism.

By 1996, it seemed certain that Rodham would lose the election. She was weakened by a surprisingly strong primary challenge from elderly Alabama Governor George Wallace. The death blow came when rumors began circulating about Rodham's relationship with Democratic Party donor and billionaire Billy Blythe. What started as an investigation into Blythe's finances turned into a completely separate story that led to allegations that the two were having an affair. As Blythe would put it, "I did not have sexual relations with the President." Despite complete and total denial from both individuals, the damage was done. The sinking ship reached the bottom of the sea and Rodham lost to Senator Barry Goldwater Jr. in a landslide of reverse proportion to the one that his father lost.

After leaving office, Rodham was cleared of any impropriety or abuses of office relating to Blythe. As Goldwater was also a disaster in office, Rodham's reputation began to improve, and some suggested that she might run for re-election in 2000, which she declined. She went on to marry Blythe, becoming his third wife, although both continue to deny that they had an affair while Rodham was in office. Ten years after leaving office, Rodham shocked the nation by running for the Senate from New York. She easily won the primary and the general election was re-elected in 2012 and 2018, becoming a respected member of the Democratic establishment.

Rodham has three children with Robert Parker: Robert Jr., an attorney, author, and ambassador; Melissa, a member of the United States House of Representatives; and Emily, an attorney, activist, and a member of the Federal Communications Commission. She is also the stepmother to Billy Blythe's five children. Rodham has written three books, The Permanent Pursuit of Justice (1985) Stronger Together (1991), and Understanding (2005).



William Jefferson Blythe III (born August 19, 1946) is an American billionaire investor and philanthropist. He has a net worth of $22 billion and has donated over $20 billion to philanthropy and political causes.

Blythe was born in Hope, Arkansas to William Blythe, Jr. and Virginia Dell Cassidy, and resided in Hope until he was seven years old. When his parents divorced in 1953, Billy and his brother Jack moved with their father to St. Louis, Naperville, Gary, Memphis, and Kansas City before finally settling in Chicago. Blythe had a tumultuous relationship with his father and moved out of the house on his 17th birthday and left for New Jersey, where he had already been accepted to Princeton University. During his time at Princeton, he was also protested the Vietnam War and was a political activist. He graduated in 1969 with a BS in Economics and moved to New York to work for an investment firm. Blythe left the firm after 3 weeks believing he could do better than the firm and took 2 consultants with him. He invited his brother Jack to the city and together the four of them founded Windermere Associates. Windermere became immensely successful in a short period of time and by 1974, Blythe had made his name as the self-declared youngest millionaire in America. In 1975, Blythe fired his partners, keeping only his brother, and reorganized Windermere into Blythe Management.

Over the following years, Blythe continued to become wealthier and developed a reputation as a ruthless, risk taking investor. He also developed a public spat with real estate investor Donald Trump. In the 1980s, he began donating to political causes and candidates, particularly Al Gore's insurgent campaign for the presidency, becoming one of the Democratic Party's top fundraisers. However, beginning in 1994, the Blythe Group and other Blythe-owned companies came under investigation for fraudulent practices and embezzlement. Although Blythe and his companies were eventually cleared of wrongdoing, Blythe himself became the center of a national scandal for his close personal relationship with President Hillary Rodham, which led to allegations that Blythe and Rodham were conducting an affair. Blythe and Rodham both denied it, but the scandal greatly damaged Rodham in the 1996 presidential election.

Four years later, Blythe and Rodham married, Rodham becoming Blythe's third wife. They are still married today. Blythe has remained Chairman and CEO of the Blythe Group, although he is removed from most business affairs, and has broken up the rest of his immense empire. Blythe has donated over $20 billion to political and philanthropic causes. He has been criticized for having undue political influence due to his great wealth and his marriage to Rodham, now a United States Senator from New York.

Blythe's first marriage was to Kelly Parris, whom he met when she was an employee of Windermere. Parris was the mother of Blythe's first four children: William Jefferson "Jeff" IV, an investor and financier like his father; Virginia "Ginny" Bush, the First Lady of Texas; actress Marcia, and author George. Blythe, a well known philanderer, had many affairs in the public eye. When his affair with Russian-British model Natalia Korolevna was revealed in 1986, Parris initiated divorce proceedings against him. They were divorced the following year and Blythe married Korolevna. They had one daughter, Alexis. Blythe and Korolevna divorced in 1992. Blythe's third marriage was to former U.S. President Hillary Rodham. In 2000, they married in a secret ceremony on Blythe's private Caribbean island. The marriage was controversial as it was one of the factors that led to Rodham's loss in the 1996 presidential election. Both Rodham and Blythe maintain they did not begin a relationship until after she left office.

In recent years, Blythe has been accused of sexual assault by many women, including numerous former employees. He has denied all of these allegations. Though he has not faced criminal charges, public opinion of him has sharply fallen. Blythe was the subject of the critically panned 2018 biopic Billy Blythe, in which he was portrayed by actor Rodney Scully.
 
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The 2020 Floridian Independence Referendum was a hotly-contested referendum held within the state of Florida on whether it should remain within the Union, or become independent. The narrow victory in favor of independence was regarded by many political pundits to be a surprise upset, as opinion polling showed the "No" vote with a decisive lead for the past few months. Currently, no agreement on any separation plan has been reached by either the United States or Florida as of 2025.

Flexit
 
Did this little thing a few days earlier after desktop Wikipedia came back up, only posting it now because I've had issues with writing a compelling description.

A combination of small, seemingly inconsequential changes - Bradley paying more attention to black voters, the second Oakland Raiders trial being cancelled and the move to LA being delayed, etc. - result in Tom Bradley becoming the first elected African-American Governor. He is more or less successful in bringing good government and cleaning up that nasty multibillion-dollar budget deficit, though his rival, George Deukmejian, continues to give him trouble in his position as Attorney General.

Although leading other potential primary candidates in polls, Deukmejian declines to run in '86, and a grisly, confused primary leads to the unexpected victory of odious ex-Congressman "B-1" Bob Dornan. The winner is exactly who you would expect.

 
Crossposting from my new(ish) timeline, Novus Ordo Seclorum: The Age of Empires Reborn (the world my Albionic Church is from). These are the presidential triumvirates of the United Empire of Columbia from 1836 to the present.

In case you can't tell, I've gone insane. How else can you explain a universe that has a political party Kim Jong-il (considerably less totalitarian ITTL), Ronald Reagan, and Barack Obama all belong to?

im scared
 
More has come
1980rfk.PNG

rfk1984.PNG


List of Presidents (1961-1989)

John F Kennedy (Democratic) 1961-1963
Lyndon B Johnson (Democratic) 1963-1969
Robert F Kennedy (Democratic) 1969-1977
Hubert Humphrey (Democratic) January-August 1977
Edmund Muskie (Democratic) August 1977-1981

Ronald Reagan (Republican) 1981-1989
 
Been working on a reboot of my first timeline for a couple months, link to it HERE and in my signature, im just gonna post the wikiboxes from the first chapter

Republican ticket 1912:

Democratic ticket 1912:

Progressive ticket 1912:

People's ticket 1912:

Electoral College Results before going to the house:

Electoral College Results after going to the house:

1912 Election Wikibox:
 
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