Alternate Wikipedia Infoboxes III

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Presenting the next installment of Hail, Britannia - this time looking at the New England provinces of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. Thanks must go to @CanadianTory for all the help and letting me bounce some ideas around.

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Nova Scotia (Gaelic: Alba Nuadh) is one of New England's ten provinces, and one of the three provinces which from Gaelic New England, the others being Cape Breton and Prince Edward Island. Nova Scotia is located in the northeast of country on the peninsula of the same name. Originally settled by the French in 1604 as part of the colony of Acadia, Nova Scotia was briefly a Scottish colony between 1629 and 1632 before reverting to French colony. The region remained under French control until Queen Anne's War (1702-1713) which saw the British gain control of Acadia, and they renamed the area "Nova Scotia".

After the French and Indian War (1754-1763), Nova Scotia expanded to include modern-day New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island (then known as St. John's Island), Cape Breton and parts of northern Maine. Prince Edward Island became a separate colony in 1769 whilst New Brunswick and Cape Breton were separated from Nova Scotia in 1782. Nova Scotia did not send delegates to the Philadelphia Congress of 1774, but successfully ganed home rule in 1782 before joining the American Colonial Congress in 1784. In 1866 Nova Scotia became one of the ten provinces to ascent to the New England Constitution Act, forming the Commonwealth of New England.

In the 21st century, Nova Scotia is one of the three New England provinces where a majority of the population speak Gaelic, a legacy of immigrants arriving from Scotland during and after the Highland Clearances, although there is a substantial Anglophone minority in Halifax and the Annapolis Valley. Nova Scotia's economy is dominated by tourism and agriculture, with a growing aerospace and defence industry which has been encouraged by investment from both the federal and imperial governments.

The 2013 Nova Scotia provincial election was held on 8 October 2013 to elect, under the additional member system, the 68 members of the Nova Scotia House of Assembly. The result of the election was the Liberals (Pàrtaidh Libearalach) under leader Stèaphan MacNèil gaining a plurality of seats, winning their first election since 1993, and forming a coalition government with the Progressives (Pàrtaidh Adhartach). Conservatives (Pàrtaidh Tòraidheach) under Premier Petar Ceallach lost nearly half their seats, a result attributed to several financial scandals during Ceallach's premiership. Gàidhlig Caidreachas (Gaelic Alliance) lost their status as the official opposition, having declined in support since forming the government between 1997 and 2001. The Greens (Pàrtaidh Uaine) and the populist People's Party (Pàrtaidh Còrdaichte) both managed to gain one seat each whilst the Progressives lost 2.

New Brunswick is one of New England's ten provinces, located in the northeast of the country, where it borders Nova Scotia to the east, Maine to the South, Prince Edward Island in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and the Canadian province of Quebec to the north and west. New Brunswick is a trilingual province, with English, French and Gaelic recognised as official languages.

The territory that makes up New Brunswick was historically part of New France and Acadia prior to 1763 when it was ceded to Great Britain after the French and Indian War and became part of the colony of Nova Scotia. Growing antagonism between the Gaelic-speaking peninsula and the mixed anglophone/francophone mainland led to the two regions to be split into two separate colonies in 1782, with New Brunswick gaining home rule in 1783 before joining the American Colonial Congress the following year. A long standing border dispute with Maine (before 1820 part of Massachusetts) was only settled in 1842, giving the province it's mordern borders. In 1866 New Brunswick became one of the ten provinces to ascent to the New England Constitution Act, forming the Commonwealth of New England.

In the 21st century, New Brunswick is the heartland of the federal Moderate Party, having surpassed the provincial Conservative party in the 1980s. The economy is dominated by the forestry and farming industries in rural areas, with the province's urban areas having more service-based economies. It is the only province in New England to have three official languages, with nearly a third of the population speaking French, predominantly in the east and north, and a small Gaelic-speaking population in the southeast.

The 2014 New Brunswick provincial election was held on 22 September 2014 to elect, under the additional member system, the 69 members of the Legislative Assembly of New Brunswick. The Moderate Party under Ted Flemming won their third consecutive term in office, having been in power since 2007, desite their majority shrinking to a single seat. The Liberals and Progressive Democrats both made slight gains, whilst the right-wing populist Confederation of Regions lost nearly half their seats. The Francophone Parti Acadien and the Green Party both increased their share of the vote, but couldn't translate this into an increase in seats. In the wake of the election, Premier Flemming announce his intention to resign from the party leadership and was replaced by John Herron in March 2015.



Hail, Britannia
UK SDP leadership spill, 2004 & leadership election, 2011
Missourian federal election, 2014
Commonwealth of New England
New England federal election, 2010
American Theatre of World War I
Liberal Party of New England
Federation of India
Oregonian general election, 2011
Kingdom of Hanover; Hanoverian general election, 2012
Kingdom of Scania; King Valdemar V; Crown Prince Christoffer
Spanish State (1936-1945)
National Republic of China (1927-1947)
Australian federal election, 2014
Florida; Floridian general election, 2013; Floridian, Texan & Californian Spanish
Britain-in-America; North American Dutch; Daniel Taylor; Isaac Brock; Taylor-Brock family; Dukedom of Manhattan
Kingdom of Hawai'i; Hawaiian general election, 2015; King Kūhiō; Native Hawaiians
Hawaiians in the United Kingdom (Hawaiian British)
Russian America; Province of Alaska; Orthodox Church in America; Alaskans; North American Russian; Russian-American Company
Mexican Empire; Mexican federal election, 2013; Emperor Agustín V; President of the Government; Josefina Vázquez Mota
First Minister of Florida; Order of the Star of Florida; 2015 Floridian independence referendum; Viceroy of Florida; Carlos López-Cantera; Juan Taylor-Brock y Menendez
Dominion of Newfoundland; Newfoundland general election, 2016; Newfoundland Gaelic; New Labrador Party; Order of Newfoundland
Kingdom of the Californias; Californians; Californian general election, 2013; King Ramón IV; Wasatch Autonomous Region; Jon Huntsman Jr.
 
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Take your pithy like and never come into my life again/joking, of course, though I am curious about how Hitchen's was selected over Portillo.
Thanks. :p I suppose having more revelations about his 'youthful indiscretions' in the press which makes some constituency association members uneasy; instead going for the more 'conventional' candidate.
 
Presenting the next installment of Hail, Britannia - this time looking at the New England provinces of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. Thanks must go to @CanadianTory for all the help and letting me bounce some ideas around.
God damn that's some magnificent work right there. Absolutely fantastic.

Plus I can see my own riding elected a Moderate, which is great.
 
Presenting the next installment of Hail, Britannia - this time looking at the New England provinces of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick.
Amazing work, I've loved ever bit of Hail, Britannia, Keep it up! How similar are the relations between the constituent countries in the UK to any existing arrangements?
 
@spookyscaryskeletons Viscount Stansgate.

Let me guess. Dad lived longer or Brother didn't die so early.
William Benn stays in the Liberal party due to a lack of credible alternatives. Yes, Michael Benn survives because well, there's no WW2 here, but Will dies at the same time as OTL. Michael picks up the mantle, while Tony goes on to become PM in the late 70's. Michael doesn't have any kids when he dies in 1990, so Tony decides reluctantly to claim the peerage himself.

Does that sound halfway plausible?
 
William Benn stays in the Liberal party due to a lack of credible alternatives. Yes, Michael Benn survives because well, there's no WW2 here, but Will dies at the same time as OTL. Michael picks up the mantle, while Tony goes on to become PM in the late 70's. Michael doesn't have any kids when he dies in 1990, so Tony decides reluctantly to claim the peerage himself.

Does that sound halfway plausible?
Perfectly plausible to me. It could even be Michael has kids but only daughters
 
God damn that's some magnificent work right there. Absolutely fantastic.

Plus I can see my own riding elected a Moderate, which is great.
Thanks :) Haha totally unintentional - but you knew it was coming!

Amazing work, I've loved ever bit of Hail, Britannia, Keep it up! How similar are the relations between the constituent countries in the UK to any existing arrangements?
Thanks, will do :)

Well the UK ITTL is very much a mix of confederal and federal structures (think a blend of OTL US federalism and EU supranationalism). The constituent countries in the British Home Isles (England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Cornwall - also Gibraltar and Malta) are much more tightly linked to the Imperial government in London. The American Dominions are given a lot more leeway given their distance (as are those in Asia, the Pacific and Indian Oceans, and Oceania), with the British American Council acting as body for discussing issues between them. Some home nations are given greater leeway because of their non-Anglophone populations, e.g. Florida and Puerto Rico, plus Mauritius, Andaman-Nicobar, Singapore, Hong Kong, Sierra Leone, and Fiji. For the most part I imagine the devolution of powers is somewhere between those of a US state (American and Oceanian dominions) and Scotland (British Home Isles), though some have a relation more akin to a US commonwealth (Florida etc.). There's also the Council of First Ministers, which meets twice a year to coordinate on matters like trade between the home nations, etc.
 
Thanks. :p I suppose having more revelations about his 'youthful indiscretions' in the press which makes some constituency association members uneasy; instead going for the more 'conventional' candidate.
You could have him put up in the Uxbridge by election and lose, thereby ending his career.
 
Duopod is regularly voted as one of the BCB's best programmes. However, it had a rather rocky start. It was initially intended as a vehicle for rising star Steve Coogan, but he broke his legs in a car accidents and was out of commission. Not wanting the idea to go out of commission, they interviewed hundreds of potential hosts. Eventually they settled on Islington Comedy Club regular Jeremy Corbyn, who's scruffiness and charm pleased the producers. However, Corbyn said he would only accept if he could bring his wife Diane along as co host. The producers were incredibly confused, but seeing how they had already printed merchandise, they went along with it.

While there was skepticism at first, quickly Corbyn and Abbott became household names. Viewers appreciated the show's quaintness and the nice locations the couple travelled to. By 1995 the show drew in more viewers on BCBII than any other. However, by 1999, the producers wanted to up the ante. So they travelled to Germany (specifically, Cologne to Hamburg) in the middle of a political crisis. This was rather controversial as Germany's government hadn't been informed, something that led to the couple almost being detained.

Despite the setback in Germany, Corbyn liked the idea of going further out on the map. Over the next few years, he and Abbott travelled to Sweden, Russia, and Hindustan, among other countries. This gave the show a new feel, and drew in audiences from across the world.

Finally, in 2014, after many spinoffs and specials, Corbyn and Abbott called it quits as they wanted to engage in more political activism (something they brought up in the show itself). Despite attempts to revive it with other celebrities, people weren't willing to watch without the iconic couple, and so the show went off the air with a heartwarming final episode shortly before the 2014 election.



Ententeverse
2014 United Kingdom General Election
2014 German Presidential Election
Hilary Benn
Michael Portillo
 
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Libertarian... Oh... Oh my...

Is that what happens to the Lib Dems? But... They're still around...

#PeakGonzo
How did the Libertarian Party get so popular in the UK?

UKIP fell in popularity after Brexit in this Infobox Series, as many people found voting for them after Brexit was pointless. Many Main Ukippers, such as Douglas Carswell and Suzanne Evans, wanted a new Mainstream, Moderate Party that was not just focused around Brexit and Immigration. They Joined The Libertarian party, which gave them their first MP (Carswell Himself) and attracted many other Libertarian Leaning Conservatives and Liberals, such as Alan Duncan (who retired as an MP in the 2020 Election and now serves as President of the Libertarian Party) and Daniel Hannan (the leader in this Infobox). Duncan and Hannan were Fed Up with the growth of the Government at the time (A recession happened in mid 2023, which is bound to happen IRL, which causes the Budget Deficit to increase dramatically) and that the Conservatives are becoming more Labour-lite than Conservative, which is what ultimately causes a vote of no confidence in Theresa May within the Conservative Party and the Installation of Boris as PM, but the Incapability of Theresa May to win the election at this time and the personal popularity of Boris Johnson are also factors. The Libertarian's popular message of balancing the budget, reducing the deficit, and cutting wasteful tax and spending ultimately almost have them tie the Conservative's in the Popular vote and win 30 seats, much more than they were expecting.

Fun Fact: Boris's term as PM is the Third Shortest on record, It was 156 days.
 
UKIP fell in popularity after Brexit in this Infobox Series, as many people found voting for them after Brexit was pointless. Many Main Ukippers, such as Douglas Carswell and Suzanne Evans, wanted a new Mainstream, Moderate Party that was not just focused around Brexit and Immigration. They Joined The Libertarian party, which gave them their first MP (Carswell Himself) and attracted many other Libertarian Leaning Conservatives and Liberals, such as Alan Duncan (who retired as an MP in the 2020 Election and now serves as President of the Libertarian Party) and Daniel Hannan (the leader in this Infobox). Duncan and Hannan were Fed Up with the growth of the Government at the time (A recession happened in mid 2023, which is bound to happen IRL, which causes the Budget Deficit to increase dramatically) and that the Conservatives are becoming more Labour-lite than Conservative, which is what ultimately causes a vote of no confidence in Theresa May within the Conservative Party and the Installation of Boris as PM, but the Incapability of Theresa May to win the election at this time and the personal popularity of Boris Johnson are also factors. The Libertarian's popular message of balancing the budget, reducing the deficit, and cutting wasteful tax and spending ultimately almost have them tie the Conservative's in the Popular vote and win 30 seats, much more than they were expecting.

Fun Fact: Boris's term as PM is the Third Shortest on record, It was 156 days.
Final question. How did Liz Kendall go from bottom of the leadership pile to leader in five years?
 
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