Alternate Wikipedia Infoboxes II

Status
Not open for further replies.
We've seen stuff on Presidents, various state and federal legislators, new branches of government, but I don't believe we've seen anything on the Supreme Court itself. I remember a few Supreme Court cases (like one regarding drafting into the CCC), but not on the court itself.
 
We've seen stuff on Presidents, various state and federal legislators, new branches of government, but I don't believe we've seen anything on the Supreme Court itself. I remember a few Supreme Court cases (like one regarding drafting into the CCC), but not on the court itself.
I've had a half-finished infobox on the backburner for a while now.

Maybe it's time to take it off.
 
The current composition of the Supreme Court of the United States. The modern Supreme Court is noted for the lengthy terms of its justices and for it being very supportive of the modern technocratic consensus. The so-called Four Horsemen (Wegner Dreyfuss, Cheryl Chang, Edward O. Posner and Paul Purcell, and frequently joined by Virginia Edsall) have dominated the court for more than 20 years, upholding many of the more controversial laws of modern Graysonian democracy, including mandatory GVAT testing, power of sequences and the National Planning Commission, national service, the Bureau of Population Relocation and (most controversially) the First Nation Reserves (more popularly known as bantustans). Many court observers consider Dreyfuss (who has spent more than half his life on the nation's highest court) the de facto Chief Justice over Michael Walton Sunermeyer due to the power and influence of the Four Horsemen--it was rumored that Dreyfuss was offered the position of Chief Justice in 2114 by Douglas Grayson but declined and then again in 2125 by Janet Gibbs after the sudden and tragic death of Heather Sharpe. Republicans and more liberal-minded Democrats have grown frustrated by the so-called Dreyfuss court and what they perceive as the largest obstacle to meaningful progress and reform in the United States.

 
I'm guessing by this stage mandatory retirement ages for supreme court justices is one of those American constitutional reforms which everyone agrees is necessary but everyone agrees won't happen because the Constitution is Jesus.
 
700+ senators. You've probably mentioned this before, but getting work done in Congress has got to be difficult with that many senators & congresspeople.

Also, noticing the amount of non-judicial offices that the justices held, I take it that the recent trend of only appointing justices of lower courts or practicing attorneys to the court either never happened or fell out of vogue.

I'm guessing by this stage mandatory retirement ages for supreme court justices is one of those American constitutional reforms which everyone agrees is necessary but everyone agrees won't happen because the Constitution is Jesus.
That's just silly. The Constitution isn't Jesus, but it was written by him. /s
 
I gotta say Archangel Michael, your FH setting is really, really cool.
Thanks!

I'm guessing by this stage mandatory retirement ages for supreme court justices is one of those American constitutional reforms which everyone agrees is necessary but everyone agrees won't happen because the Constitution is Jesus.
No, no federal mandatory retirement ages yet. Nobody wants to get it done since it might open the door for term limits for legislators, so Congress doesn't want to open that can of worms. That and average life expectancy is edging closer and closer to 100, so it's not that odd.

700+ senators. You've probably mentioned this before, but getting work done in Congress has got to be difficult with that many senators & congresspeople.
A lot of what Congress does (both in the Senate and House) are handled at the committee-level, so the committees (which contain hundreds of members) act as mini-legislatures with their own leadership structure and rules. Floor votes are largely perfunctory.

Also, noticing the amount of non-judicial offices that the justices held, I take it that the recent trend of only appointing justices of lower courts or practicing attorneys to the court either never happened or fell out of vogue.
It's a cyclical thing here, paticularly because the Supreme Court is seen as far more political than the lower courts. But as seen with a few of the more recent nominees, things are swinging the other way.

That's just silly. The Constitution isn't Jesus, but it was written by him. /s
The U.S. Constitution was written by James Madison after he was visited by the archangel Columbia during the Convention.
 
I'm mildly surprised there wasn't an increase in Court size. I mean considering how huge the US is, and how huge the various branches of it's government are, you'd think they'd add at least a few more seats.
 
Shoot, the National People's Congress of China has 2,987 members. :eek:
The 174th United States Congress was comprised of 748 Senators (357 D - 382 R - 9 I) and 3,022 Representatives (1,704 D - 1,303 R - 15 I).

I'm mildly surprised there wasn't an increase in Court size. I mean considering how huge the US is, and how huge the various branches of it's government are, you'd think they'd add at least a few more seats.
There's been ongoing discussions about it, but so far it's amounted to nothing since nobody wants to be the one who gets accused of court packing. And 9 is a nice, workable number.
 
The 174th United States Congress was comprised of 748 Senators (357 D - 382 R - 9 I) and 3,022 Representatives (1,704 D - 1,303 R - 15 I).
Sweet jumping Yaldabaoth.

There's been ongoing discussions about it, but so far it's amounted to nothing since nobody wants to be the one who gets accused of court packing. And 9 is a nice, workable number.
But 13 is an even more American number! One for each original colony.
 
Sweet jumping Yaldabaoth.
I just realized that I was missing a few states, so there's even more!

There are 375 states and an additional 100 territories. Constitutional reform is sorely needed.

But 13 is an even more American number! One for each original colony.
Adding more justices wouldn't necessarily work. What they either need is more time in a year to hear more cases or separate Supreme Courts for criminial, civil and constitutional cases.
 

NothingNow

Banned
The Independence Islands Advisory Council is the primary legislative and consultative body for the Independence Islands Territory, and has been since it’s first session began in 2047.
The Advisory Council has little official power, legally only existing to advise the Governor, although in practice the Governor will often rubber stamp resolutions made by the Advisory Council on things of which the Governor has little interest or experience, which will then be carried out by the various organs of the territorial government.
Given the size of the territory, the Advisory Council is a part time position, meeting for a week every month, and most of it’s members have traditionally been residents who have other, often offbeat, careers, as is exemplified by surfboard maker “Sleepy” Skagul, the current Council Chair Jenny Geddes Orlop, who is a sailmaker and swimsuit maker, and Matt Gaetz, a Veterinarian.
Districts have for the most part gone unchanged for almost sixty years following the creation of Iktat’s 3rd and 3th Districts, and the 2nd Outlying District, as the population has been mostly stable, although it is assumed that redistricting authority falls to the Governor, and is subject to the whims thereof, although no governor has used this power except when requested by the Advisory Council.
Given that the majority of Non-Kanaga residents of the islands are members of the Coast Guard or their dependents, most are disqualified from public office, resulting in a plurality of the Advisory Council’s members being Kanaga, with the sole exception being Matt Gaetz.




The Casual Putsch was a political crisis brought about by Acting Governor Captain John Jackson’s controversial decision to ban the practice of casual fridays for Civil Servants and Civilian Contractors in the territory, as well as instituting a dresscode for the Advisory Council when Governor and Rear Admiral Noreen Sanders went on leave to attend a family reunion in Delray Beach, Boca Raton.
Upon discovery on their arrival for that they now had to wear formal dress including long pants during council sessions, multiple Councilmembers were heard muttering angrily, and decided Acting Governor Jackson had become a tyrant who needed to be stopped.
To that end, the angry Councilmembers, led by “Sleepy” Skagul and discovered that Jackson had been foolishly using the one restroom in the Council House that locked from the outside, proceeded to lock him in said bathroom, and barricaded the doors to the Council House while they attempted to reach Admiral Sanders, leaving Jackson in the room for four agonizing hours.
Finally, having reached the Admiral, she was found to agree with the Council’s complaint that Jackson had overstepped his bounds, and agreed to rescind Jackson’s appointment, and to hand temporary authority over to Council Chair Jenny Geddes Orlop, until Admiral Sanders returned from vacation that friday. After this, Captain Jackson was released from his temporary imprisonment, the remainder of the Council session went on as usual, sans dresscode, and casual fridays were reinstated.
 
Top
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top