Alternate Wikipedia Infoboxes II

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Thande

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One wee mini-POD too - Galloway loses the Bradford West by election.
Interesting idea, but 2013's a bit early for UKIP to make any breakthroughs, and especially not in Newark of all places. Boston's just about possible I suppose but it's rather unlikely.

It also seems a bit odd to describe the Lib Dems losing more than half their seats as 'a mild relief' - compared to OTL yes, but they wouldn't know that.
 
Nuttall in Skegness? I can't see it.

Yeah, forgot for a moment that he was a Liverpudlian.

Interesting idea, but 2013's a bit early for UKIP to make any breakthroughs, and especially not in Newark of all places. Boston's just about possible I suppose but it's rather unlikely.

To be fair, UKIP was polling in the teen's at that time. I think the 'surge' started around late 2012.

It also seems a bit odd to describe the Lib Dems losing more than half their seats as 'a mild relief' - compared to OTL yes, but they wouldn't know that.

Some odd phrasing, I know, but my reasoning is that they would feel relieved because they were imagining single figures after Clegg's disasterous first debate performance. (Yes, I'm aware that Clegg is actually a pretty good debater, but let's say he has a Nixonian preparation)
 
Election 2020: Don't Fuck With President Testaburger

President Cartman's term of office was one of the most traumatic the Republican Party had ever seen. His aggressive and uncompromising stance against political opponents (who he dismissed as 'hippies') raised hostility to his party, and his abolition of virtually all state welfare provisions delighted conservatives, but liberals and even some moderates were enraged. It didn't help that he also cut public spending by over 17%, with rumours abound that he took the money for himself (though this has never been proven).

With unemployment increasing 1.3% per year throughout Cartman's presidency, the Republicans lost both Houses of Congress in 2018, and despite his persistent vetoing of more liberal legislation (with his insistence in his 2019 address to Congress that they should 'respect my authoritah' and to 'kiss my ass'), Cartman's approval ratings were the lowest since records began by the time he ran for a second term.

His popularity with the conservative-dominated GOP assured Cartman's renomination, but the only question about his rematch against the Testaburger/ Marsh ticket was how badly he would lose. The answer was 'very'.

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I'm actually looking for an old box from here, possibly the first thread: I think it had Bryan in 1896 as the Populist nominee, separate from the Democrats. Can someone link it to me?

NVM: Found it (but it was a bit different then I remembered).
 
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I'd love to see this election mapped, I'm curious where the bigger Lib Dem breakthrough hits.

Here's a list of the extra seats they have TTL:

Bristol West
Teignbridge
Bridgwater
Wells
Mid Dorset & Poole North
Totnes
North Norfolk
Tiverton & Honiton
Dorset West
Eastbourne
Falmouth and Camborne
Surrey South West
Oldham East & Saddleworth
Rochdale
Westmorland & Lonsdale
Guildford
Aberdeen South
Wiltshire North
Cheadle
Southend West (just imagine, LibDems in essex!)
Dorset North
Hastings and Rye
Orpington
New Forest East
Folkestone and Hythe (yeah, I know, this would require a bigger swing)
Worthing East & Shoreham
Bournemouth East
Ryedale
Woking
 
Interesting idea, but 2013's a bit early for UKIP to make any breakthroughs, and especially not in Newark of all places. Boston's just about possible I suppose but it's rather unlikely.

It also seems a bit odd to describe the Lib Dems losing more than half their seats as 'a mild relief' - compared to OTL yes, but they wouldn't know that.
I saw this post quoted and I got really confused. I twas thinking, "What does UKIP have to do with Newark or Boston?". :eek:
 
Here's a list of the extra seats they have TTL:

Bristol West
Teignbridge
Bridgwater
Wells
Mid Dorset & Poole North
Totnes
North Norfolk
Tiverton & Honiton
Dorset West
Eastbourne
Falmouth and Camborne
Surrey South West
Oldham East & Saddleworth
Rochdale
Westmorland & Lonsdale
Guildford
Aberdeen South
Wiltshire North
Cheadle
Southend West (just imagine, LibDems in essex!)
Dorset North
Hastings and Rye
Orpington
New Forest East
Folkestone and Hythe (yeah, I know, this would require a bigger swing)
Worthing East & Shoreham
Bournemouth East
Ryedale
Woking

Thanks! Those are some pretty astounding results: all of Somerset, most of Dorset and Devon, big chunks of Surrey and two of the safest Tory seats around (Worthing East and Shoreham and New Forest East) going Lib Dem? How have the mighty fallen, huh?
 
An extremely unrealistic thought experiment, inspired by all the Prohibition talk going around Post-1900 yesterday.
30s style Knesset.png

Prohibition Party - in the wake of the Binge Drinking Epidemic of the early 21st century, along with sundry failures of the NDLP, the Prohibition Party emerged from its Scottish strongholds to take Westminster by a landslide. It positions itself using centre-left rhetoric, but in social terms, it is quite a conservative party, seeking to promote community spirit by closing pubs and replacing them with Temperance Halls. Their opponents complain of draconian puritanism invading every aspect of daily life (employers and the SIS are now allowed to examine individuals' Mine Of Information browsing history, for instance) but Cambpell's media-savvy leadership has left most critics for dead.

Social Credit - a centre-right populist party dating from the inter-war period, the Socreds are almost unique in having ideological social clubs for youths in most schools. These organisations, together known as the Kibbo Kift, are known for their indoctrination techniques and their slightly sinister preoccupation with sending groups of boys to go and ramble in the middle of the countryside with minimal supervision. At any rate, Socred voters are known for their loyalty to the cause, and this is the reason for their quick supplanting of the moribund Conservatives. Frances Hutchinson is Leader of the Opposition.

Common Wealth - a pacifist socialist party, Common Wealth re-emerged in a big way after the start of the War In Sudan, which caused widespread revulsion against the criminality and colonial mentality of the UK and USA. Coming into this election, Salma Yaqoob was the junior member in an NDLP-led coalition, but they successfully maintained their outsider cred, not to mention their seats.

National - a rebrand of the centrist wing of the ailing, splitting Conservative Party, taking with it most of the former Liberal splits. Clarke is much-loved but little voted-for, and is usually found in coalition with a dominant party. Under Campbell's premiership, there is a lot of hand-wringing on the National side about civil liberties which may well bring down the current coalition.

Constitutionalist Party - the Old Tory right, sent into the wilderness in the last couple of decades but back with a vengeance this election on a platform of abandoning the EEC in favour of the Commonwealth, repealing the Parliament Act of 1911 and reducing the welfare budget. They won 12 of the 18 Northern Ireland seats in 2013.

Independent Liberal Party - the only Liberal splinter party to survive to the present day, it is led by a charismatic celebrity, Dan Snow, who has taken advantage of his good looks to win the 'Peeple Election' on the MOI but not the Actual Election. Snow is Minister of Education under Campbell, and his party is not noticeably opposed to the authoritarian measures of the Prohibition-led government.

National Democratic and Labour Party - formed after a series of splits and schisms in the Labour movement in the 20s, 30s and 40s. It was the dominant party of government after the National-Constitutionalist Split, but a series of gaffes, serious scandals and illegal wars (especially under their latest PM, Steve Reed) made them shamefully unsuitable for office. Reed's resignation as leader has ushered in a new era of faction-fighting amongst various branches of Moderates, each following a charismatic yet divisive leader. There are almost constant leadership elections.

Womens' Party - a feminist party dating from the 1960s. It spends more time debating whether or not to keep pink as the party colour than in doing anything constructive, but most agree that they are a force for good in Parliament, as long as they don't win too many seats.

Communist Party - a Communist party, most successful in Northern Ireland.

Liverpool Protestant Party - a sectarian party based in Liverpool. There have been tensions between this group and the Liverpudlian Irish community since the year dot.

30s style Knesset.png
 
Independent Liberal Party - the only Liberal splinter party to survive to the present day, it is led by a charismatic celebrity, Dan Snow, who has taken advantage of his good looks to win the 'Peeple Election' on the MOI but not the Actual Election. Snow is Minister of Education under Campbell, and his party is not noticeably opposed to the authoritarian measures of the Prohibition-led government.

You have until sundown to explain why this party's leader's surname isn't Lloyd-George.
 
Here's a little series I've been thinking of creating for a while.

A Storm in the Teapot

No one ever really expected the vastly popular incumbent President Warren G. Harding to face a serious challenge for the Presidency in 1924 - let alone from a little known dark horse compromise candidate settled on by the hundred and third ballot at the Democratic Convention - however that is exactly what occurred in 1924. A little context is needed; in August 1923 President Harding barely survived a cerebral hemorrhage brought on by a heart condition he had - and in the following months he made an adequate recovery. However all was not well with his Presidency. In 1922 a massive scandal hit the news and threatened to drag Harding and members of his Administration down with it. In the ensuing months it was revealed that Warren Harding's Secretary for the Interior, Albert B. Fall, had accepted hundreds of thousands of dollars in bribes from his oil tycoon friends in return for Fall giving them bidding-free leases to drill in various oil reserves, such as the Teapot Dome reserve. Fall was removed from his position and with his friends he was arrested, indicted, convicted and jailed for bribery and conspiracy charges. Many Republicans were privately disgusted by this, with progressive Wisconsin Senator Robert M. LaFollette going so far as to openly attack the President - a line which was not taken by many other elected Republicans who felt that a single scandal did not warrant destroy the Presidency of Harding.

Harding himself was still quite popular with the public as a whole despite the rather large dent to his popularity and image. He went on a charm offensive with his wife, Florence who popular in her own right. The scandal however continued to claim more scalps including Attorney General Harry Daugherty who was found to have accepted bribes - he was later arrested and convicted on corruption charges. The President continued to fight for his political life as the scandal continued to eat it's way towards the centre - the killer blow for his Presidency came when it was revealed that he had been involved with insider trading and was also involved with allegations of bribery. More officials associated with him resigned and/or were implicated with the scandal.

Harding continued his tour across the nation - but it was apparent his political power and popularity was crumbling - especially when the Republican controlled Congress voted to override his veto of several pieces of legislation. Harding was however still a formidable opponent for anyone who was deemed 'stupid' enough to challenge him for the nomination - that was until Wisconsin Senator Robert M. LaFollete decided to challenge him. The primary battle itself lasted all the way to the convention and was decided after multiple ballots with Harding and his Vice President Calvin Coolidge being chosen by the delegates to once again be the Republican standard bearers.

The Democrats themselves had a hard time choosing their nominee. At first it seemed as if it was going to be a fight between frontrunners William G. McAdoo of California and Al Smith of New York, with 1920 nominee James Cox of Ohio far behind. By the 15th ballot Smith and McAdoo had edged their delegate counts up slightly while Cox fell and former Ambassador to the United Kingdom, John W. Davis of West Virginia had pushed Cox down into forth place. By the fifteenth ballot McAdoo had started to fall while Davis continued to rise - this trend continued up to and past the thirtieth ballot. By the forty second ballot Davis had fallen and McAdoo limped closer towards the nomination. By the sixty first ballot Davis had fallen some more and McAdoo resolved to try and get rid of other candidates by introducing a motion to remove the lowest placed candiate after each round of voting - this was rejected by a coalition of Smith delegates and those delegates supporting Favourite Sons. By the seventieth ballot McAdoo was inching further closer to the nomination - however many considered this to be his ceiling of support and expected his votes to fall. Many of his delegates proposed Indiana Senator and Ku Klux Klan backed Indiana Senator Samuel M. Ralston. It looked as though Ralston could become the nominee, but he decided to remove his name from consideration due to his bad health (he died the next year.) After this McAdoo was in free fall and fell down to just above Smith at around 30% of the vote. By the one hundredth ballot the convention was stripped of all honours and saw Davis emerge as a black horse compromise candidate. Smith briefly held the lead as McAdoo's voters deserted him for Davis - by the hundred and third ballot Davis had won the nomination. Davis proceeded to select three time Democratic Party nominee William Jennings Bryan's brother - Governor Charles W. Bryan of Nebraska as his Vice Presidential nominee. In his acceptance speech Davis made the perfunctory statement that he would enforce the prohibition law, but his conservatism prejudiced him in favor of personal liberty and home rule and he was frequently denounced as a wet. The dry leader Wayne Wheeler complained of Davis' "constant repetition of wet catch phrases like 'personal liberty,' 'illegal search and seizure,' and 'home rule'." Davis also condemned the Klan and cited his prior defense of black voting rights as Solicitor General under Wilson - this lost him some votes in the Solid South - but gained him some elsewhere.

Elsewhere speculation increased to rumour that Wisconsin Senator Robert M. LaFollette was going to launch a third party run for the 'Progressive Party' - similar to Theodore Roosevelt in 1912. He surprised nearly everyone when he refused to endorse Harding (effectively endorsing people to vote for Davis as the lesser of the two evils (ie conservative candidates.) The election itself was noted as one of the high tides of American conservatism as both major candidates campaigned for limited government, reduced taxes, and less regulation. Davis received the endorsement of many conservatives and conservative publications who would nominally have supported a scandal free Harding but founding the less sleazy Davis to be an acceptable Democrat. On election day Davis won a narrow victory over Harding; the Socialist Party candidate Norman Thomas won over 5% while the Prohibition Party - which had nominated KKK (re)founder William Joseph Simmons with D.C. Stephenson - the popular head of Indiana KKK.

John W. Davis took the oath of office in March 1925 while the nation wondered what exactly his Presidency would mean.

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Cool. I'd expect Davis to be re-elected in 1928 due to the good economy and then a progressive Republican to be elected in 1932 with his own New Deal.

EDIT: Herbert Hoover in 1932. MY EYES!!!!!!!!!

In all serious, I expect Hoover in '32 to take a more progressive stance.
 
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