Alternate Weapons of War thread...

Just to let you know that the book "Au Bord de l'Abîme" is now available in english as "At the Edge of Darkness".
Here on Amazon.
Not so miraculous weapons

Here are some illustrations of some "not so miraculous" weapon from my book "Au Bord de l'Abime".

1st: The Ise class battleship are converted to antiaircraft battelship:



2nd the Nachtpanther.
A variant of the fmous panther tank with a longer canon, night vision equipement, better radio and engine.


3rd, little variant of Me-262 in use in the [FONT=&quot]JV 44.

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A combined arms section of the Kompanie Villebois-Mareuil makes last minute preparations before storming a Freeporter Black Spears pirate stronghold on the Kashar Plateau, deep within the interior of the equatorial highlands.

In the foreground, dismounted Legionaar mercenaries armed with M91 autofusil rifles of pre-Collapse origin take up their jump-off positions, supported by the Tirailleur-class Bakkie combat vehicles Tonkin and Usuthu. The Tirailleur-class modification of the common Bakkie transport is a Legionaar innovation, largely derived from archival schematics of the pre-Collapse Armscor Cheetah MRAP, itself a heavily modified military variant of the utilitarian Grysbok chassis that constitutes the base of the present day Orbitaaler Bakkie. The Tirailleur-class modification sacrifices the spacious interior volume, heavy payload capacity, amphibious fording capability, raw engine power, and operating range of the common Bakkie for improved all-terrain handling, armor protection, crew/core systems survivability, and armaments package. The Tirailleur-class sports a swivel-mounted ablative mining laser, a weapons system that is commonly deployed on Ossewa-class heavy lifters and Afrikander surface cruisers but impossible to install on an unmodified Orbitaaler Bakkie. Under ideal atmospheric conditions, the ablative laser is effective out to long range against soft-skinned targets like Freeporter wind-skiffs and Djong-Kok pirate sailskimmers but vulnerable to most anti-laser countermeasures and defenses, including particulate smokescreens, reflective chaff, and military-grade ceramsteel armor plating. For the mid range work of blasting breaching points into the ancient orbital wreckage that houses most Freeporter pirate dens, however, the armaments package of the Tirailleur-class modification is more than adequate.
 
Winchester Model 1917 Battle Carbine.
Too late to see action in the First Great War the M17 was developed from the Winchester model 1907 which was produced for the civilian market for small game hunting and chambered in the .351 Winchester Self-Loading (8.9mm) cartridge, the rifle came with 5 and 10 round magazines.
Many Union officers and some non-coms purchased model 1907's from their own funds and wrote up positive reviews that were passed up to the Brass with recommendations that the Army adopt the rifle with a few modifications made for improved combat usage.

The Army surprisingly followed suit and purchased several model 1907's for testing and evaluation, after testing the Army requested that Winchester make a variant of the rifle for the Union Army with better and more rugged sights, larger capacity magazines (15-20 round mags) and a bayonet lug.
Winchester responded positively to the request and introduced the model 1917 to the Army but the rifle came too late to see service during the Great war.
The rifle was not adopted by the Army but many police departments did purchase the rifle in good numbers and in the 1930's the Army again showed an interest in the gun and adopted the M1917 in 1935. The rifle was to be issued to officers and non coms as well as barrel crews and other soldiers who would not be required to carry the standard issued rifle for regular use.

The model 1917 M2 came with select-fire capability, a barrel shroud (a common complaint about the gun was over heating during long term rapid fire) and was favored by Union paratroopers and captured guns were popular with Confederate troops as well.
The Model 1917M2 would continue to see service in the 1950's during the "Banana Wars" being used by fighters on both sides of the conflict.

Winchester M1917 ~ OTL Winchester Model 1907 (Select Fire) II.png


Made from an OTL Winchester model 1907 with some parts borrowed from an M1 carbine.
The idea for this gun was inspired by this thread - https://www.alternatehistory.com/forum/threads/earliest-possible-assault-rifle-earliest-plausible-adoption.479482/
 
I have some questions for 19th century breechloader rifle fans/experts:

Would it be possible to mount a telescope/spyglass on an 1873 Trapdoor Springfield and turn it into a single-shot sniper rifle ?

And, if you could decide between using a Sharps rifle and a Spencer rifle as the preferred sharpshooter rifle for daily use, which would you go for ?

(I read that the Spencer, despite its nowadays somewhat goofy-seeming magazine placement, had good, reliable ammo as a repeater, while the Sharps was hella-accurate, but had ammo that often degraded quickly after longer storage. I suppose both rifles have their strong and weak aspects.)


I want to decide about these things for my steampunk story series. I want to use strictly pre-1900 designs for the rifles. I have already shown a fictional slide-action breechloader on the previous page, based on combining a Martini-Henry with the slide-action of a Winchester 1897. Now I'd like to ask a few more tech-plausibility questions about rifles from the second half of the 19th century.

A combined arms section of the Kompanie Villebois-Mareuil makes last minute preparations before storming a Freeporter Black Spears pirate stronghold on the Kashar Plateau, deep within the interior of the equatorial highlands.
Mars zouaves with assault rifles ! Love it ! XD
 
I have some questions for 19th century breechloader rifle fans/experts:

Would it be possible to mount a telescope/spyglass on an 1873 Trapdoor Springfield and turn it into a single-shot sniper rifle ?

And, if you could decide between using a Sharps rifle and a Spencer rifle as the preferred sharpshooter rifle for daily use, which would you go for ?

(I read that the Spencer, despite its nowadays somewhat goofy-seeming magazine placement, had good, reliable ammo as a repeater, while the Sharps was hella-accurate, but had ammo that often degraded quickly after longer storage. I suppose both rifles have their strong and weak aspects.)


I want to decide about these things for my steampunk story series. I want to use strictly pre-1900 designs for the rifles. I have already shown a fictional slide-action breechloader on the previous page, based on combining a Martini-Henry with the slide-action of a Winchester 1897. Now I'd like to ask a few more tech-plausibility questions about rifles from the second half of the 19th century.



Mars zouaves with assault rifles ! Love it ! XD
I would say the Sharps would make the better sniper rifle, better accuracy and better range than the Spencer.
Give the Spencer to the cavalry.
 
I would say the Sharps would make the better sniper rifle, better accuracy and better range than the Spencer.
The Sharps is excellent long-range, if you can put up with it being a single-shot, but that's no issue to a skillful sharpshooter.

I don't know why, but for a long time, I thought the Sharps of the ACW era were not yet cartridge-firing guns, only to learn they already used metallic casings. That's a point in their favour. My story protagonists and their ilk can't be bothered with non-cartridged ammo, that would make their life and adventures a lot more difficult and finicky.

You haven't mentioned the Trapdoor, though ! Would that make a good sniper rifle ? I've always wondered about that.


Looking at Skall's test-shooting video of that Trapdoor replica, it's a damned fast single-shot. I do wonder whether a spyglass would fit in front of the trapdoor mechanism, making both quick loading and aiming down through the scope equally easy.

Give the Spencer to the cavalry.
The aerocavalry, trumpets and all ? :p LOL. :)

More seriously, I have to wonder whether the Spencer simply cannot compete with the underslung tube magazine rifles of the 19th century, whether it's the Winchesters, or the Henry, or the Martin-Henry, or even the Colt Lightning Carbine, and loads of others.
 
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The Sharps is excellent long-range, if you can put up with it being a single-shot, but that's no issue to a skillful sharpshooter.

I don't know why, but for a long time, I thought the Sharps of the ACW era were not yet cartridge-firing guns, only to learn they already used metallic casings. That's a point in their favour. My story protagonists and their ilk can't be bothered with non-cartridged ammon, that would make their life and adventures a lot more difficult and finicky.

You haven't mentioned the Trapdoor, though ! Would that make a good sniper rifle ? I've always wondered about that.


Looking at Skall's test-shooting video of that Trapdoor replica, it's a damned fast single-shot. I do wonder whether a spyglass would fit in front of the trapdoor mechanism and making both quick loading and aiming down through the scope equally easy.



The aerocavalry, trumpets and all ? :p LOL. :)

More seriously, I have to wonder whether the Spencer simply cannot compete with the underslung tube magazine rifles of the 19th century, whether it's the Winchesters, or the Henry, or the Martin-Henry, or even the Colt Lightning Carbine, and loads of others.
 
Sexay. Sharps with a scope ?


How about one for a Trapdoor ! I think we have a keeper.

Both are good, but the Trapdoor is probably a bit faster.
From I've read the Springfield wasn't as accurate as the Sharpes was and the empty shell casings had a bad habit of getting stuck in the barrel after firing.
 
From I've read the Springfield wasn't as accurate as the Sharpes was and the empty shell casings had a bad habit of getting stuck in the barrel after firing.
That they indeed could. Nevertheless, it was one of the fastest single-shots of the era.

Currently, I am making a bit of a photographic chart showing all the firearms I have chosen as inspiration for my steampunk series.
 
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