Alternate names for Ukraine?

Ukraine seems to be a relatively modern name for the region (I think it emerged in the 1800s? Correct me if I am wrong), so what are some other possible names that the Ukrainians could have chosen for their nation when it gained independence for the first time in 1917?
 
Ukraine seems to be a relatively modern name for the region (I think it emerged in the 1800s? Correct me if I am wrong)
You're wrong:
http://info-news.eu/debunking-stereotypes-about-the-history-of-ukraine/
Among the sources that can help to shed some light on the history of Eastern Europe, in particular Ukraine, are the Chronicles and ancient maps, composed by many travelers, including French traveler and scientist Guillaume Le Vasseur de Beauplan (1595-1685), who called the territories of present-day Ukraine as “Ukraine”, and the territories of present-day Russia as “Muscovy” or “Tartary”.
The first use of the word “Ukraine” in the known written sources is dated under 1187. The passage speaks about the death of Volodymyt Hlibovych (Duke of Pereyaslav – now the city of Pereiaslav-Khmelnytskyi, located in Kyiv region). Let me quote the Primary Chronicle. “Complete Collection of Ruthenian Chronicles” (called in France as Russian Chronicles [PSRL]) published in 1908 in the Russian Empire [Volume 2, pages 652-673]. Since they have been published in Russia by the Russians during the Russian Empire, you cannot blame me for wishing to rewrite the history.

« ѡ нем же Оукраина много постона » – Ukraine has moaned (cried) a lot for him. (Literally – Ukraine was in deep mourning because of his death).

Another passage of the same Chronicle, dated under 1189, says that Duke Rostyslav Berladnyk arrived in “Ukraine of Galicia”.

« И еха и Смоленьска в борзѣ и приѣхавшю же емоу ко Оукраинѣ Галичькои » – And he was heading from Smolensk to Borz, and he arrived in Ukraine of Galicia.
I've seen some argue that the use of the word "Ukraine" in the Primary Chronicle simply means "land"/"borderland" rather than a specific nation (so for example according to that argument the "Оукраинѣ Галичькои" in the Primary Chronicle would refer to "Land of Galicia"/"Galician hinterland" and not "Ukrainian Galicia") but regardless, the term "Ukraine" is older than 19th century.
 
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It may not fit the exact borders of OTL Ukraine, but Ruthenia is a possibility.

The term Ruthenian, though, was only used for the Ukrainians of Austria-Hungary. (Ruthenia is simply a Latinized form of Rus', of course.) The portion of Ukraine in the Russian Empire was generally called "Little Russia." Even an icon of Ukrainian national consciousness like Taras Shevchenko used "Little Russia" in his private diary. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Russia
 
The term Ruthenian, though, was only used for the Ukrainians of Austria-Hungary. (Ruthenia is simply a Latinized form of Rus', of course.) The portion of Ukraine in the Russian Empire was generally called "Little Russia." Even an icon of Ukrainian national consciousness like Taras Shevchenko used "Little Russia" in his private diary. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Russia

If Lviv becomes the centre of the Ukrainian national consciousness over Kiev, then I could see Ruthenia becoming popular. Especially since Lviv was a centre of the Ukrainian national consciousness.:p
 
Little Russia and Red Russia were both used (as opposed to White Russia (=Belarus), and Great Russia (=Velikaya Rossiya?? = Russia proper)).

Ruthenia is certainly a possibility.
 
Southern parts of modern Ukraine along the Black Sea shore can be referred to as Novorossiya - New Russia, a term coined after tzarist Russia conquered these lands from Ottomans.

Western edge of modern Ukraine can be called Red Russia.

Little Russia is probably the best variant if we want to acknowledge the entire country.
 
I really find most of the suggestions to be rather absurd with a post-1900 POD. Even if you go with the idea that "Name "Ukraine" exists only since 1800s" (something that I showed is false with my last post) that means that it's been around for over 100 years by 1917.

To have names like "Scythia" I think you need a different national myth to form, with some nationalist figure during the rise of nationalism claiming that inhabitants of "Ukraine" are the proud descendants of the Syrh or something.

No independence movement (well, excluding the current separatists but that's a different story) that I know off called for a new country of "Malorussia" or "Novorussia". I think the reasons for that should be obvious. I can see names like "Novorussia" sticking around and becoming regionals names in a world where Communist Russia doesn't give up those territories to Communist Ukraine, but OP specifically asked for alternative names for independent Ukraine instead of the alternative name for the region(s) of present-day Ukraine.

Perhaps a less ASB idea that wasn't expressed yet would be for a Ukrainian state that draws more on the history of Ukrainian Cossacks and calls itself the "Zaporizhian Hetmonate" or the just "Hetmonate". Maybe something like this could happen if Pavlo Skoropadskyi's regime lasts and he tries to build legitimacy and continuity between his rule and those of national founding figures.
The term Ruthenian, though, was only used for the Ukrainians of Austria-Hungary. (Ruthenia is simply a Latinized form of Rus', of course.) The portion of Ukraine in the Russian Empire was generally called "Little Russia." Even an icon of Ukrainian national consciousness like Taras Shevchenko used "Little Russia" in his private diary. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Russia
It's been a while since I've read Shevchenko's work, but don't his poems have referances to Ukraine/Ukrainians?
Little Russia and Red Russia were both used (as opposed to White Russia (=Belarus), and Great Russia (=Velikaya Rossiya?? = Russia proper)).
"Red Russia"?

I don't think I've heard of that one before. Care to cite any sources?
 
"Red Russia"?

I don't think I've heard of that one before. Care to cite any sources?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_Ruthenia

Ethnographers[who?] explain that the term was applied from the old-Slavonic use of colours for the cardinal points on the compass. The ancient totem-god Svetovid had four faces. The northern face of this totem was white, the western face red, the southern black, and the eastern green. However, some inconsistency exists in the theory such as the fact that nothing is known about Green Ruthenia and the Black Ruthenia is located to the west from the White Ruthenia. Another theory suggests that the name could have arisen from already established polity of the Red Cities (Grody Czerwieńskie). Some towns in the area carry names related to the color red.
 
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