Alternate invasive/introduced species

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: After 1900' started by Aloha, Jul 13, 2019.

  1. Aloha Well-Known Member

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    Let's brainstorm some ideas for some alternate invasive/introduced species and how much of an impact they create on their new environment. Not all of them have to be necessarily detrimental to the environment they're established in, just enough that they're able to maintain a population in a certain environment. Can be flora or fauna. No humans.

    Some ideas I had:
    -Perhaps some wealthy French or Italian businessman/woman imports some snow leopards in the Alps or Pyrenees? In the case of the Pyrenees, could this perhaps be an alternate factor in the extinction of the Pyrenean Ibex? Maybe they learn that domesticated/feral sheep, calves and goats are easier prey and create a problem for the local farmers. As they start to become accustomed to their habitat, they spread across and perhaps move into Germany, Switzerland and Spain too.

    -Komodo dragons in Everglades?

    -Some stupid bogan living in Queensland somehow gets a hold of some crab-eating macaques and releases them to the Daintree Rainforest.

    -Perhaps more thought is put into reintroducing bears into Africa after the extinction of the Atlas bear, and some Cantabrian brown bears and/or Marsican brown bears are introduced into North Africa? After all, it was likely that the Atlas bear was actually a Cantabrian brown bear population was introduced to Africa from Spain by the Romans.

    As for wolves, lynx, bears and wolverines in the UK and Ireland, well that's actually likely to happen quite soon (at least for one or two of the animals; I think the lynx would do best). But if you want, then come up with an earliest possible POD for them to be reintroduced there after 1900.

    I wonder how well polar bears will do in Antarctica. I mean, there's enough penguins and seals for them to eat there.

    Now your turn.
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2019
  2. unclepatrick Well-Known Member

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  3. Aloha Well-Known Member

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    Reminds me a lot of Pablo Escobar's escaped hippos in Colombia.
     
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  4. Plateosaurus Well-Known Member

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    I once wrote a story about feral white rhinoceros in Texas, which you can read here (https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/conceptual_evolution/a-history-of-the-odessa-rhinoceros-t3468.html).

    Another idea I have are introducing tasmanian devils to the midwestern US as a failed attempt at domestication in pest control/carrion disposal. This could lead to an interesting dilemma if it doesn't butterfly the world and tasmanian devils remain endangered as in OTL. Do we try and bring them back to Tasmania and Australia, or cull or sterilise them all?
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2019
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  5. Aloha Well-Known Member

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    Very interesting! I'll be sure to read that.

    Also, how about some introduced servals or caracals in a certain area to control rodent populations? Caracals can be tamed and have been used for hunting since Ancient Egypt. It would probably cause some issues for native birds though.

    Reintroduction of Komodo dragons to Australia is another idea.

    Maybe the baiji gets introduced to the Everglades or Mississippi by someone wealthy. If they adapt well enough and breed at a good rate, then maybe we could see a baiji that's extinct in China but still extant overall.

    Can't believe I forgot something so obvious: cheetahs in North America, perhaps used to control pronghorn.
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2019
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  6. Aloha Well-Known Member

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    How about raccoons in the UK? I think they'd do pretty well there.
     
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  7. Driftless Geezer

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    Like many of these species transfers, it might well be a huge environmental catastrophe'; but raccoons likely would thrive in the UK. They're extremely adaptable to rural, suburban, even some very urban environments in a wide range of climates. The same conditions might be true for the coyote.
     
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  8. Driftless Geezer

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    Camels in the US Southwest and Northern Mexico. Have the US Army Camel Corps import more animals during the 1850's.

    The Mongoose was introduced to Jamaica (and other Caribbean Islands?). Both the Mongoose and it's close relative, the Meerkat, appear to adapt well to living on the edge of human settlement, so they might thrive in a number of non-native locations. (Again, with potential environmental disruption to local environments)
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2019
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  9. Aloha Well-Known Member

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    Camels would do quite well in that habitat. Riding camels through the Sonoran Desert is actually a tourist attraction. Maybe a few of those escape too?

    There are also game ranches in Texas housing Scimitar-horned Oryx and Addax, so they could always just be released there. After all, I believe there is a population of feral nilgai in Texas and they're doing fairly well (a great exotic hunting opportunity though).
     
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  10. Byzantion Well-Known Member

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    Komodo Dragons in Africa ? How would they adapt in the Savanna ?
     
  11. b0ned0me Well-Known Member

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    The little bastards are rampaging across the rest of Europe so they should do well in UK. Only potential issue is the population density of urban foxes which is unbelievable.
     
  12. Driftless Geezer

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    A further cultural notion..... An AH re-wording for "Home on the Range"....
    "Oh give me a home where the camel-ids roam... and the deer and the antelope pla-ay..."​
     
  13. Richard V Well-Known Member

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    Mississippi is almost as polluted as the Yangtze. Not sure if it would be viable. But maybe the Panara river in South America would make good sanctuary for the baiji and Yangtze finless porpoise.

    Tropical South America could host Asian elephants and rhino species native to Indonesia as well as the now extinct western black rhino. Their ancestors habited the continent after all.

    The Bactrian camel is suited to the cold deserts of southern Argentina.

    The yak would be useful in Alaska and Canada. I think it has been introduced in Siberia but not in great numbers. The great auk might have avoided extinction were it introduced to Hudson Bay or the Barents Sea.
     
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  14. Kaze Well-Known Member

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    Human beings.

    Anywhere.


    ===

    Actually wolves did exist once in England, Scotland, and Wales - they were hunted into extinction much like the rest of the European wolf.
     
  15. Aloha Well-Known Member

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    Not talking about humans (already stated on OP).

    Aware of that, hence why I said introduced back there.
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2019
  16. Kaze Well-Known Member

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    Sorry... okay...

    Let us see... South African Penguins to Iceland. I think they might thrive.
     
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  17. MatthewB Banned

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    Canada Geese to Australia.
     
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  18. MatthewB Banned

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    They would I’d say. And good eating, once they spread our Newfies will be calling them Sea Chicken.

    Sled dogs left behind in the Antarctic survived very well on the local animals. The dogs were eventually shot.
     
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  19. MatthewB Banned

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  20. Aloha Well-Known Member

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    I guess the reason that Canadians are so polite is because all their anger is transported to the geese.
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2019
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