Alternate History Combat Aircraft

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Fighter from a world in which Austria-Hungary makes it to the early 1940s.
This plane looks rather badass here
 
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Another one of these from Giant Canada World: German fighter with Mustang lineage, developed because this world's equivalent of Edgar Schmued remains in Germany. Hence, the Messerstang. As an aside: Giant Canada World's German markings are green-heavy because of a greater role for Saxony in the formation of Germany, and with British inspiration because of closer ties to the UK.
 
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Another one of these from Giant Canada World: German fighter with Mustang lineage, developed because this world's equivalent of Edgar Schmued remains in Germany. Hence, the Messerstang. As an aside: Giant Canada World's German markings are green-heavy because of a greater role for Saxony in the formation of Germany, and with British inspiration because of closer ties to the UK.
Very cool.
 
Another one of these from Giant Canada World: German fighter with Mustang lineage, developed because this world's equivalent of Edgar Schmued remains in Germany. Hence, the Messerstang. As an aside: Giant Canada World's German markings are green-heavy because of a greater role for Saxony in the formation of Germany, and with British inspiration because of closer ties to the UK.
Its very interesting how the very "greebly" G-6 like nose breaks up the otherwise increadibly clean lines of the Mustang and makes the whole thing look much less sleek but way more agressive. What kind of armament does the thing cary? I expect some form of Motorkananone and the bulges in the cowling point to heavy MGs mounted there.
The "RAF-but-its-Saxony" roundel and markings are also super awesome!
 
What kind of armament does the thing cary? I expect some form of Motorkananone and the bulges in the cowling point to heavy MGs mounted there.
Looks like two heavy MG's in the nose and a cannon thru propeller hub, much like late war Me-109's.
 
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Supplementary silliness from Giant Canada World: Namely, primary land-based dogfighters of the Great World War.

For the top three, aka the Central Pact powers: The Hawker Hydra Mk. VII (Great Britain), the Curtiss-Rhodes P-53B Blackhawk (Commonwealth of Canada) and the Schmued D.XXVII (German Empire). For the bottom three, aka the Populist Alliance: The Vernisse V.110 (France/Intena regime), the Shimizu S.36 Suisei (Japan) and the Duks SeP-7 "Perun" (Russian State). Other powers are in the mix, but don't produce their own late-war piston-engined dogfighters because they've either been trashed in the fighting or don't have the industrial power to do it. (Austria-Hungary is a notable absence here because it gets beat up hard by the Populists early and mid-war.)

Yeah, the Perun is basically a Russified Jug. Seversky stays in Russia here, Schmued stays in Germany, Japan buys engines from France and Canada is a giant thing all its own.

And yes, re. earlier, the D.XXVII does come with a cannon in the prop hub and two heavy MGs in the nose.

I can't take full credit for the Hydra design, either. It's basically my interpretation of Hush-Kit's Griffon-engined Super Hurricane.
 
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OvXAyXq.png

Supplementary silliness from Giant Canada World: Namely, primary land-based dogfighters of the Great World War.

For the top three, aka the Central Pact powers: The Hawker Hydra Mk. VII (Great Britain), the Curtiss-Rhodes P-53B Blackhawk (Commonwealth of Canada) and the Schmued D.XXVII (German Empire). For the bottom three, aka the Populist Alliance: The Vernisse V.110 (France/Intena regime), the Shimizu S.36 Suisei (Japan) and the Duks SeP-7 "Perun" (Russian State). Other powers are in the mix, but don't produce their own late-war piston-engined dogfighters because they've either been trashed in the fighting or don't have the industrial power to do it. (Austria-Hungary is a notable absence here because it gets beat up hard by the Populists early and mid-war.)

Yeah, the Perun is basically a Russified Jug. Seversky stays in Russia here, Schmued stays in Germany, Japan buys engines from France and Canada is a giant thing all its own.

And yes, re. earlier, the D.XXVII does come with a cannon in the prop hub and two heavy MGs in the nose.

I can't take full credit for the Hydra design, either. It's basically my interpretation of Hush-Kit's Griffon-engined Super Hurricane.
Pretty cool. :cool:
 
Supplementary silliness from Giant Canada World: Namely, primary land-based dogfighters of the Great World War.

For the top three, aka the Central Pact powers: The Hawker Hydra Mk. VII (Great Britain), the Curtiss-Rhodes P-53B Blackhawk (Commonwealth of Canada) and the Schmued D.XXVII (German Empire). For the bottom three, aka the Populist Alliance: The Vernisse V.110 (France/Intena regime), the Shimizu S.36 Suisei (Japan) and the Duks SeP-7 "Perun" (Russian State). Other powers are in the mix, but don't produce their own late-war piston-engined dogfighters because they've either been trashed in the fighting or don't have the industrial power to do it. (Austria-Hungary is a notable absence here because it gets beat up hard by the Populists early and mid-war.)

Yeah, the Perun is basically a Russified Jug. Seversky stays in Russia here, Schmued stays in Germany, Japan buys engines from France and Canada is a giant thing all its own.

And yes, re. earlier, the D.XXVII does come with a cannon in the prop hub and two heavy MGs in the nose.

I can't take full credit for the Hydra design, either. It's basically my interpretation of Hush-Kit's Griffon-engined Super Hurricane.
I really dig nearly all of the designs! They are all very believable late war designs with most of them even keeping a number of design elements that clearly link them to the respective nations of OTL (especially the german, french and japanese ones). The only one that I dont like that much is the Blackhawk, the aerodynamics on that thing with the very pointy nose are a bit too post-war for my taste, but its still an overall very cool design.
Its also interesting that you have the Japanese use an inline engine, that implies a significantly different industrial and production background for them.
 
Some twin boom aircraft for @ Petike to play with
 

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Supplementary silliness from Giant Canada World: Namely, primary land-based dogfighters of the Great World War.

For the top three, aka the Central Pact powers: The Hawker Hydra Mk. VII (Great Britain), the Curtiss-Rhodes P-53B Blackhawk (Commonwealth of Canada) and the Schmued D.XXVII (German Empire). For the bottom three, aka the Populist Alliance: The Vernisse V.110 (France/Intena regime), the Shimizu S.36 Suisei (Japan) and the Duks SeP-7 "Perun" (Russian State). Other powers are in the mix, but don't produce their own late-war piston-engined dogfighters because they've either been trashed in the fighting or don't have the industrial power to do it. (Austria-Hungary is a notable absence here because it gets beat up hard by the Populists early and mid-war.)

Yeah, the Perun is basically a Russified Jug. Seversky stays in Russia here, Schmued stays in Germany, Japan buys engines from France and Canada is a giant thing all its own.

And yes, re. earlier, the D.XXVII does come with a cannon in the prop hub and two heavy MGs in the nose.

I can't take full credit for the Hydra design, either. It's basically my interpretation of Hush-Kit's Griffon-engined Super Hurricane.
All of these look awesome, keep up with the good work
 
I really dig nearly all of the designs! They are all very believable late war designs with most of them even keeping a number of design elements that clearly link them to the respective nations of OTL (especially the german, french and japanese ones). The only one that I dont like that much is the Blackhawk, the aerodynamics on that thing with the very pointy nose are a bit too post-war for my taste, but its still an overall very cool design.
Its also interesting that you have the Japanese use an inline engine, that implies a significantly different industrial and production background for them.
Part of the later-style design is that the timeframe for the Great World War is slightly later here - it pushes into 1946.

Some twin boom aircraft for @ Petike to play with
I like 'em.
 
Part of the later-style design is that the timeframe for the Great World War is slightly later here - it pushes into 1946.
Ah, ok that makes sense then! The aerodynamics of the Blackhawk remind me very strongly of some of the mixed propulsion designs of the immediate post war era.
I would also like to again ask about armaments :D From OTL fighter designs its pretty easy to identify the kinds of threats the producing nation faced from the armaments they used on their fighters.
 
Ah, ok that makes sense then! The aerodynamics of the Blackhawk remind me very strongly of some of the mixed propulsion designs of the immediate post war era.
I would also like to again ask about armaments :D From OTL fighter designs its pretty easy to identify the kinds of threats the producing nation faced from the armaments they used on their fighters.
The Blackhawk is basically an ultra-refined Warhawk type.

In terms of armaments, the Blackhawk carries six .50 cals in the wings for use mainly against other fighters, and the Hydra carries four 20mm cannons in the wings because they want the added firepower against French bombers. The D.XXVII has a mixed cannon/heavy-MG armament. The Populist powers are more fond of prop-hub cannons - or rather, the French are, while the Japanese and Russians used French-based engine designs and picked up the prop-hub technology from them. The V.110, Suisei and Perun all have a 30mm nose cannon; the V.110 adds a pair of heavy MGs in the cowling, the Suisei has two 12.7mm machineguns in each wing, and the Perun has two heavy machineguns in each wing.
 
I like the thread, but I have a question.

Can we make requests for aircraft for specific circumstances of alternate history? What I have in mind is alternative fighters for a pre-WWII USA that goes on a war footing in Sep, 1939 (but doesn't actually start fighting until attacked on Dec 7th, 1941) and creates a "United States Air Defense Force", which differs from OTL's USAAC/USAAF/USAF in that it is a fighter centric force, there are no bombers in it, and it's role is to include everything to defend against air attack, as opposed to an air force the is meant to be used against sea and land based attacks as well.

One thing that I personally didn't know was the extent to which the 'Bomber Mafia' had gone to pre war in trying to get as many bombers as possible, including trying to keep US aircraft manufactures from building fighter planes with the internal plumbing to make use of drop tanks, and companies that did, wouldn't get any contracts. Color me stupid I guess, but I never would have thought something like that could even have been a thing.

So, anyway, what kind of alternative aircraft would appear if the first thing that the notional USADF did was too specifically ask for longer ranged fighters, especially for the Pacific theater?
 
I like the thread, but I have a question.

Can we make requests for aircraft for specific circumstances of alternate history? What I have in mind is alternative fighters for a pre-WWII USA that goes on a war footing in Sep, 1939 (but doesn't actually start fighting until attacked on Dec 7th, 1941) and creates a "United States Air Defense Force", which differs from OTL's USAAC/USAAF/USAF in that it is a fighter centric force, there are no bombers in it, and it's role is to include everything to defend against air attack, as opposed to an air force the is meant to be used against sea and land based attacks as well.

One thing that I personally didn't know was the extent to which the 'Bomber Mafia' had gone to pre war in trying to get as many bombers as possible, including trying to keep US aircraft manufactures from building fighter planes with the internal plumbing to make use of drop tanks, and companies that did, wouldn't get any contracts. Color me stupid I guess, but I never would have thought something like that could even have been a thing.

So, anyway, what kind of alternative aircraft would appear if the first thing that the notional USADF did was too specifically ask for longer ranged fighters, especially for the Pacific theater?
Well one might be a supercharged Bell XFL Airibonita. Supercharged it could maybe match the Hurricane in performance specs

Which would lead to a supercharged Bell P39 for the USADF. Which would be a scary bomber interceptor

Oh and a supercharged P40 too if you really must (yes I'm a P 39 fanboy shoot me lol)
 
Well one might be a supercharged Bell XFL Airibonita. Supercharged it could maybe match the Hurricane in performance specs

Which would lead to a supercharged Bell P39 for the USADF. Which would be a scary bomber interceptor

Oh and a supercharged P40 too if you really must (yes I'm a P 39 fanboy shoot me lol)

All of the mentioned aircraft - Airabonita, P-39 and P-40 - have had supercharged engines. Granted, the superchargers on the V-1710s were not that good, and the V-1710 itself was a small engine.
Airabonita was a bit faster than the Hurriane I.
 
....What I have in mind is alternative fighters for a pre-WWII USA that goes on a war footing in Sep, 1939 (but doesn't actually start fighting until attacked on Dec 7th, 1941) and creates a "United States Air Defense Force", which differs from OTL's USAAC/USAAF/USAF in that it is a fighter centric force, there are no bombers in it, and it's role is to include everything to defend against air attack, as opposed to an air force the is meant to be used against sea and land based attacks as well....
So what you are outlining is a stopgap measure interceptor force to be ready should any bombers ever try to threaten US territory from.... Well, I guess... Mexico, Cuba and Saint Miquelon.

As for the planes, I imagine first a massive beefing-up of the existing last generation of pre-war types: Curtiss P-40, Bell P-39 and probably a dedicated interceptor version of the P-38. Then I imagine the government asking around what sacrifices to the existing airframes could be made in order to speed up production and use less strategic materials. I imagine a P-40 with fixed landing gear or an attempt to build a wooden p-39. I would also include a one-seat fighter version of the North American T-6 as production of that on is already well underway.

The third layer will be to specifically draw out a requirement for a cheap and easy to build fighter plane using non-strategic materials where possible. (The USAAF will want to keep their own bomber/ground attack/long range fighter programs going for the following counter-attack) companies targeted will mostly be second and third-tier manufacturers or those not normally considered defence contractors. Be prepared to see proposals from Beech, Stinson, Piper or even one-off race plane manufacturers as Laird, Howard and Weddell-Williams.

Also prepare the Bell XP-77 to get considered in earnest.

I will post some ideas later this weekend.
 
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