Introduction
Greetings dear readers, speculators and fellow football fans. As of writing this introduction, I am still in the process of working on the 2002 World Cup knockout stage in my Brotherhood and Unity timeline, but lately I have been thinking of introducing a thread that gives anyone who reads this the freedom to write alternate football wikis/documentary based on any team (be it club or national side) or footballing competition that they desire, from any era. How will this work? Well first of all - This is not a timeline. Anyone can write any sort of post that is part of their own continuity. For example, while I might make a wiki detailing Yugoslavia winning the 1996 Euro and being a footballing powerhouse, someone else could also write about Yugoslavia being a consistent flop. Or, I could make a wiki detailing Germany being a powerhouse of Football like OTL with some changes, while someone else can make a wiki where Germany is a constant dark sheep of World Football. Even if both are the same topic, they are a different execution.

Second. Anyone can make their own version of any World Cup, Euro, club football competition. There is no limit, and even the same World Cups can be done by multiple people.
What if Scotland was in the 1970 World Cup? What if the 2012 Euro was the first to have 24 teams? What if the Cup Winners Cup remained as a competition and so on. As I said, anyone can make their own version of the same topic, but please just put a disclaimer if it is already a part of a timeline you are already doing for the sake of letting the rest of us know.

Third, the wikis can contain multiple parts that focus on the club or competition. So if you ever forgot to add something to your wiki, feel free to post the rest, or even a new part detailing a new epoch of the team or a continuation of the previous competition. On Sunday, I will release the my post of this thread, and it will focus on Dresdner SC had Germany remained united after the war. In the meantime, as I said, anyone can make their own version of such a topic, or even make a post where a underdog like Raith Rovers are a footballing force to be reckoned with. I am looking forward to see what you will come up with :)
 
Dresdner SC: Early years
1200px-Dresdner-sc-1898.svg.png

Dresdner SC
Name: Dresdner Sportclub
City: Dresden
Nickname: The Friedrichstadters
Founded: 30 April 1898
Venue: Rudolf Harbig Stadion
Capacity: 32, 085
League: Bundesliga

Dresdner Sportclub 1898 e.V., known simply as Dresdner SC, is a German multisport club playing in Dresden, Saxony. Founded on 30 April 1898, the club was a founding member of the German Football Association (Deutscher Fussball Bund) in 1900. The origins of the club go back still further to the predecessor side Dresden English Football Club formed in 1874 by expatriate Englishmen as Germany's first football club and possibly the earliest in continental Europe: Dresdener SC was organized by one-time German members of the EFC.

Early History and founding
On 30 April 1898, former members of the Dresden English Football Club and of the Neue Dresdner FC (founded in 1893 by former DEFC members and now SpVgg Dresden-Löbtau 1893) founded the Dresdner Sport-Club. Until sports historian Andreas Wittner uncovered the earlier history of the DFC, it was thought to have been founded only in 1890. Early on, DSC made regular appearances in regional finals and captured several titles. They were a dominant side in the Mitteldeutsche Verbandsliga: from 1925 to 1930 they lost only two of the ninety games they played.
The club's original crest
Dresdner_SC_1898.png
1930s and 40s
Dresdner's performance slipped for a time, but the club re-emerged as a strong side in the Gauliga Sachsen, one of sixteen top flight divisions established in the re-organization of German football under the Third Reich. They captured the Tschammerpokal – the predecessor of today's German Cup in 1940, 1941, and followed up with national titles in 1943 and 1944. The club won all 23 games they played during the 1942/43 season, scoring 152 goals and conceding only 16. Their 4:0 win over Duisburg in Berlin's Olympiastadion meant that the club had won 6 trophies in a span of four years, including two doubles in 1941 and 1943. By 1945 though, the German Football Championship was interrupted due to the Second World War, with Dresden being the last champion of the Third Reich.
Helmut Schon playing for Dresden
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The post-war era (1945-1950)
The occupying Allied authorities dissolved organizations across Germany, including sports clubs like Dresdner SC, after the war as part of the process of denazification. The city of Dresden was in ruins following the Allied bombings that took place, and the following two or so decades saw the city being built from scratch following the bombings. The situation in the city could be compared to what was happening to the club itself, with it also being rebuilt with its past legacy in ruins. Dresdner SC was reestablished in 1946 as SG Friedrichstadt, and it was mostly a struggling side in the East Soviet Occupied Zone championship, while the communist-supported ZSG Horch Zwickau dominated the competition along with Turbine Halle. 1949 though saw the integration of Germany as a unified nation after 4 years of divide, and this brought in a change within the Footballing sphere in Germany. Most significant of all was the re-organization of the German Football Championship, with the Oberligas deciding regional Champions that would then play in the national Finals. The inaugural 1949/50 East Oberliga season saw Friedrichstadt Dominate the league with 87 goals scored, and coming to the final day of the league, they were tied in points with ZSG Horst Zwickau, which still had its best players that the club poached from others over the course of the past five years. The communist influence, while gone, could still be felt in some parts of the East German territory. Nowhere else could this be felt than in the final match of the East Oberliga.

SG Friedrichstadt met ZSG Horst Zwickau at the Heinz-Steyer-Stadion in Dresden on 16 April 1950. The match would practically decide which of the two teams would compete in the German Football final for the 1950 season. The match was attended by 60,000 spectators at the Heinz-Steyer-Stadion, where ZSG Horch Zwickau won the match 1–5 and qualified for the national final. The match was characterized by a very physical play from ZSG Horch Zwickau and several controversial referee decisions in favor of ZSG Horch Zwickau. The players of SG Friedrichstadt left the pitch without greeting their opponents and thousands of angry Dresden spectators invaded the pitch. Within weeks, orders came from the newly-established DFB to punish Friedrichstadt by expelling them from the Oberliga, thus throwing the club in the Bezirksliga for a whole year. For the first time in what would become a common occurence, the Dresden populus rioted after witnessing injustice judged upon their club.

The scenes of the 1950 Dresden riots
image.jpg
Rise and fall (1950-1962)
Led by Helmut Schon, Friedrichstadt immediately went up to the Oberliga Ost after their brief stint in the Bezirksliga, and the 1952/53 season saw Friedrichstadt finally win the East Oberliga after a tense Final against Chemnitzer FC, in which The Friedrichstadters won 3-2 following extra time. This triumph was Dresden's first regional win since 1944, when the Gauliga was in place. With the Oberliga won, Friedrichstadt qualified for the 1953 German Football Championship, where they won 4-2 against Kaiserslautern. The very same year, the club famously gained rights by the DFB to rename themselves back to Dresdner SC, shortly before the 1953 German Football Championship began. Combined with them winning the championship, it was seen as a symbolic win of the Saxon club after years of opression, first by the Soviets, then by the DFB.
The 1953 Dresdner SC squad
220322_Historie_Gruenderjahre.jpg
This success would eventually end with the club struggling for the next few years, with the club constantly finishing in the middle of the Oberliga. That said, 1957 saw the club coming dangerously close to being relegated to the lower tiers of German football once again, but managed to avoid disaster by only 3 points. By 1958, the club was made of young players and reserves, and the club managed to win an unlikely DFB Pokal against Stuttgart. Despite this great feat, Dresdner SC couldn't compete anymore against the ever-improving Teams of the East Oberliga, and the club saw relegation for the first time in 1962.
Re-emergence (1962-1969)
Following the drop to the 2nd Oberliga, the Friedrichstadters then saw themselves drop even further down to the Amateurliga in 1964, in which they spent a single season in. That very same year saw the Establishment of the German Bundesliga - a Federal League which saw the champions of their respective Oberligas qualify for this highest tier German Football. With this, the East Oberliga was renamed into Regionalliga Ost.

1965/66 saw a slight stabilization within the Amateurliga, and the club spent only one year there before finishing 4th in the 1966/67 Regionalliga Ost. Finally, the 1968/69 season saw Dresden finish 1st in the East Regionalliga and play in the Bundesliga promotion play-off, where they beat Rot-Weiss Oberhausen to qualify for the Bundesliga. For the first time, Dresden was now playing in the Highest Level of German football since 1953. Soon, Dresden would enter its greatest years, but not before facing the hardships in the Bundesliga
2b5c3256e01cc6c609f4e315da8821f2f11142ba-fp-1200-680-0-0.jpg

Changes in this timeline:
1. There is no Luftwaffen SV Hamburg in 1944 German final, and no Rapid Vienna in the 1941 Cup as Ostmark has its own Cup competition, much how Bohemia and Moravia and Slovakia had theirs during their Occupation, thus Dresden gets two German trophies
2. After Ww2, Germany gets to be United after the Soviets are butterflied away, thus leaving the East Occupation zone to merge with the rest of the occupied zones
3. 1958 DFB Pokal sees Dresdner SC win against Stuttgart
4. Without any sort of communist authorities, Dresdner SC doesn't get dismantled in 1953, and Dynamo Dresden never gets established. This also means a good number of that eras Hertha BSC players and Helmut Schon never Leave Dresden to join Hertha, like they did IRL.

I have a bit of a fever, so I was able to stay at home and finish the post a bit quicker. Anyway, This first part has only focused on the early years of Dresden. In the next part, I will focus on the club's golden and subsequent "Roller-coaster" years. Looking forward to what you lot have in store 🙂
 
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Dresdner SC: Bundesliga era
Entry into Bundesliga and glory years (1969-1978)

Walter Fritzsch took over the coaching post at Dresden in June 1969, and the famous Dresden roundabout got going. The club's debut season in the Bundesliga saw The Friedrichstadters finish 8th, comfortably above the relegated Teams and their fellow promoted club in Rot-Weiss Essen, and the club established a reputation as a fortress, as they won 13 out of their 17 home games, and only lost twice. The most memorable victory came when Dresdner SC won a dramatic 4-3 match against Bayern, with Hans-Jurgen Kreische scoring a hat-trick against the reds. In its first season in Bundesliga, Dresden qualified for the Inter-cities fairs cup, thanks to the city of Dresden holding trade fairs. The Friedrichstadters reached the second round of the competition, where they were beaten by eventual champions Leeds United.

Walter Fritzsch, Dresden's greatest manager
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The 70s would see Dresden's most glamorous era, with the club lifting the 1970/71 DFB Pokal, thus Qualifying for the 1971/72 European Cup winners Cup. In their first ever European season, The Friedrichstadters managed to reach the Semi-finals where they narrowly lost to Dynamo Moscow on penalties. From that season onwards, Dresdner SC became a regular competitor in European Competitions, with them reaching the quarter finals of the 1972/73 UEFA Cup, where they lost out to eventual champions Liverpool, along with reaching the UEFA Cup Semi-final in 1979.

Perhaps the most iconic season in Dresden's history came in the 1972/73 iteration of the Bundesliga. That particular season saw Dresdner SC being Bayern Munich's only challenger, with the two clubs establishing a rivalry during this particular season. The "Ost-West" Rivalry first saw the derby in Munich's Olympiastadion, where the Friedrichstadters shocked the Reds by tying 4-4 against them, and even leading 2-3 by the end of the first half. The following match in Dresden saw the Rudolf Harbig Stadium sold out, with a crowd of 35 thousand. Dresdner won the match 5-3, with the Red-and-blacks placing themselves at the top of the Bundesliga table, and they wouldn't look back. The end of the season saw Dresdner SC prevail against Bayern by only one point, thus taking their first national title in 20 years. The Bundesliga triumph saw Dresdner SC debut in the European Cup - Europe's most prestigious competition. Dresden managed to go all the way to the final, where they played against the free-flowing and spectacular Red Star Belgrade generation of the early 70s, led by Miljan Miljanić. The match lasted for 120 miniutes, until Dragan Džajić scored from 15 meters away to bring Red Star to its first European triumph.

Dresden's Golden Generation of the 70s
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Roller-coaster years (1978-1991)

After the 1977/78 season, successful coach Fritzsch was dismissed and Gerhard Prautzsch took over his post. The following season saw Dresden fail to qualify for the European Competitions for the first time, while the next few years saw the club swinging from relatively good domestic/Continental results to spectacular failure. The 1982/83 season saw Dresden facing the threat of relegation for the first time since joining the Bundesliga, but the club managed to bounce back the following year to win the double, but their campaign in the European Cup came to a screeching halt when they lost 5-0 against Austria Vienna. 1985 saw Dresden reach the DFB Pokal finals for the second time in two years, but then shockingly lost 7-3 to Minnows Bayer Uerdingen, thus failing to qualify for any European Tournament.

The next three years saw Dresden being constantly trapped in mediocrity, with the club avoiding relegation in 1986. The next year though, Dresden barely managed to qualify for the UEFA Cup, but then surprised by reaching the Semi-final of the competition before being knocked out by Stuttgart. Nonetheless, 1989/90 saw Dresden win the Bundesliga for the third time in its history, after once again beating Bayern. They also came close to lifting the DFB Pokal, but eventually lost on penalties against Kaiserslautern. But, the 1990s would see a further change in Dresden's fortune, as the Bundesliga was approaching its most competitive era.

The scenes from the Miracle of Uerdingen
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Stagnation (1991-1999)
The 1990/91 European Cup saw Dresden reach the Quarter finals once more, where they faced off against Yugoslav National Champions Red Star Belgrade. The two-legged encounter saw Red Star dominate the Friedrichstadters, but the second leg in particular saw a disturbing sight as Dresden's fans rioted against the Yugoslav team, along with uttering xenophobic remarks. This troubled fan behavior had been a case within Bundesliga and its eastern Teams (in particular Hansa Rostock) for the better part of the late 80s, but this escalation into the European scene saw the UEFA Intervene, and Dresden was banned from participating in European Competitions for a full year. The early 90s saw Dresden struggle to achieve any considerable success, with their best Bundesliga finish being a 6th in the 1995/96 season, and a cup win the season prior. The Friedrichstadters would only participate two more times In Europe during this decade, reaching the round of 16 of the 1994/95 Cup Winners Cup, where they lost out to Feyenoord, and a poor showing in the 1996 Intertoto Cup, where they accumulated only two Wins.

Torsten Gutschow - Dresden's top goalscorer
1693574839642.png

Eventually, Dresden finished 16th in the 1997/98 Season of the Bundesliga, and for the first time since 1969, they were going to play in the 2nd tier of German football. Despite fielding some skilled players and even bringing in Darko Pančev, the team was so poorly managed that most of the quality players were sold after a season or two. Torsten Gutschow remained loyal to Dresden throughout all of the 90s, and he ended his career right as Dresdner descended to the second tier of German Football. Dresden's Bundesliga era had thus come to an end.

The Dresden riots
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Changes in this timeline:
1. Dresden Wins the 1971 DFB Pokal, thus reaching the 1971/72 Cup Winners Cup Semi-finals
2. The famous Dynamo Dresden v Bayern matches of 1973/74 essentially go Differently, and Dresden manages to win the Bundesliga with them thus reaching the 1974 European Cup final. With no BFC Dynamo, Dresden qualifies for the 1984/85 European Cup.
3. Dresden wins the 1993/94 DFB Pokal, and with the Eastern Teams not being completely uncompetitive in the 90s, some of the prominent western Teams get relegated instead.

The next, final post will detail Dresdner SC's modern years and include the club's statistics
 
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I could do soem from my sports world, but i don't really have the pateince or desire to go through the clubs entire history lol.

Which is a shame, cause i would've done west ham and leeds first.
 
I could do soem from my sports world, but i don't really have the pateince or desire to go through the clubs entire history lol.

Which is a shame, cause i would've done west ham and leeds first.
Honestly, they don't have to be entire Wikis detailing the whole history. Feel free to just add stats and a short synopsis. These posts of mine are no standard-setters. Anyone can make their own interpretation.
 
West Ham United
1200px-West_Ham_United_FC_logo.svg.png

Name: West Ham United Football Club
City: London
Nickname: The Hammers
Founded: 29 june 1895, as Thames Ironworks
Venue: Boleyn Ground
Capacity: 35, 016
League: Football League 1st division


HONORS

Domestic:
First Division:
1985-1986, 2004-2005, 2005-2006, 2009-2010, 2012-2013

Second Division: 1980-1981

FA Cup:
1963-1964, 1974-1975, 1988-1989, 2002-2003, 2005-2006, 2006-2007, 2009-2010, 2011-2012,

League Cup: 1965-1966, 1986-1987, 1989-1990, 2004-2005, 2006-2007, 2012-2013, 2014-2015

European

European Cup: 2006-2007

Cup Winners cup:
1964-1965, 2003-2004, 2012-2013

Intertoto Cup: 1999


In this world, the west london club is one of the msot successful clubs of the modern era. After their first taste of major glory in both domestic and european cup competitions in the 1960s, with a squad led by future world cup winners Bobby Moore and Geoff Hirst, the club would suffer through relegation in the 70s despite winning a secodn FA Cup in 1975 and a fonals appearance in the 1976 edition of the cup winners cup.

Winning promotion in 1981, west ham quietly build a good side featuring tony gale, alvin martin and academy products alan dickens and Tony Cottee. The 1985-1986 season sees West ham emerge as a huge underdog contender for the league title against the powerhouse liverpool and everton sides, eventually winning their first ever first division title on the last day of the season after an undefeated second half of the season.

The late 80s would mark the first golden age of West Ham, with Cottee, Martin, Gale and Dickens being joined by fellow academy graduates Paul Ince, George Parris and Steve Potts as well as shrewd signings like Birmingham's David Seaman, AC Milan's returning englishmen Mark Hately and Ray Wilkins and their first ever foreign star in swede Anders Limpar. Two league cups in 1987 and 1990 and a third FA Cup in 1989, along with exploits agains the mighty liverpool in said cup finals as well as overcoming a 3-0 deficit agaisnt Oldham in the semi-finals of the 1990 league cup marked west ham's second most successful decade, albeit coming up short in european competitions at early stages.

The 90s would see the stars of the team leave one by one. Seaman to Arsenal, Ince to Bobby Robson's Manchester United, Limpar to Everton and Tony Cottee to Leicester City sent West Ham into a rebuild phase.

Thankfully, it wouldn't last for long, for new manager Harry Redknapp inherited a brilliant generation of young talents emerging from the academy: the likes of Rio Ferdinand, John Terry, Joe Cole, Kieran Richardson, Glen Johnson, Jermaine Defoe, Michael Carrick and Frank Lampard all made their debut for the club in the late 90s and early 00s, with a surprise intertoto triumph the humble beginnings of the club's greatest years. An FA Cup win in 2003 was followed by a cup-winners cup triumph against Michael Ballack's Bayer Leverkusen, while the arrival of European cup winning manager Jose Mourinho and czech Goalkeeper Petr Cech coincided with teh golden generation hitting their prime at the same time.

From.then on, West Hame would dominate the 2000s, winning back-to-back league titles in 2005 and 2006, league cups in 2005 and 2007 and back to back FA Cups in 2006 and 2007, with the culination bejng a cup treble, as they defeated Olympique Lyonnais in the 2007 european cup final for their first and only time. Even a change in manager didn't stop West Ham, for Carlo Ancelotti would win the 2010 and 2013 league titles, along with an FA Cup in 2010 and 2012 and a league cup and the cup winners cup for another treble in 2012-2013.

The last dance for that generation would be 2014-2015, where the club would win the league cup, but bow out in thenleague to Mauricio Pocchettino and Gareth Bale's Southampton. Since then, West Ham has been declining and going on a rebuild, with the likes of Reece Oxford, Michael Antonio, Manuel Lanzini, Ben Johnson, and Declan Rice leading the current team.


So yeah, with fergie sacked in 1990, no skysports and no blood money in football, things are...quite different in my world 😎
 
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1200px-West_Ham_United_FC_logo.svg.png

Name: West Ham United Football Club
City: London
Nickname: The Hammers
Founded: 29 june 1895, as Thames Ironworks
Venue: London Stadium
Capacity: 62, 500
League: Football League 1st division


HONORS

Domestic:
First Division:
1985-1986, 2004-2005, 2005-2006, 2009-2010, 2012-2013

Second Division: 1980-1981

FA Cup:
1963-1964, 1974-1975, 1988-1989, 2002-2003, 2005-2006, 2006-2007, 2009-2010, 2011-2012,

League Cup: 1965-1966, 1986-1987, 1989-1990, 2004-2005, 2006-2007, 2012-2013, 2014-2015

European

European Cup: 2006-2007

Cup Winners cup:
1964-1965, 2003-2004, 2012-2013

Intertoto Cup: 1999


In this world, the west london club is one of the msot successful clubs of the modern era. After their first taste of major glory in both domestic and european cup competitions in the 1960s, with a squad led by future world cup winners Bobby Moore and Geoff Hirst, the club would suffer through relegation in the 70s despite winning a secodn FA Cup in 1975 and a fonals appearance in the 1976 edition of the cup winners cup.

Winning promotion in 1981, west ham quietly build a good side featuring tony gale, alvin martin and academy products alan dickens and Tony Cottee. The 1985-1986 season sees West ham emerge as a huge underdog contender for the league title against the powerhouse liverpool and everton sides, eventually winning their first ever first division title on the last day of the season after an undefeated second half of the season.

The late 80s would mark the first golden age of West Ham, with Cottee, Martin, Gale and Dickens being joined by fellow academy graduates Paul Ince, George Parris and Steve Potts as well as shrewd signings like Birmingham's David Seaman, AC Milan's returning englishmen Mark Hately and Ray Wilkins and their first ever foreign star in swede Anders Limpar. Two league cups in 1987 and 1990 and a third FA Cup in 1989, along with exploits agains the mighty liverpool in said cup finals as well as overcoming a 3-0 deficit agaisnt Oldham in the semi-finals of the 1990 league cup marked west ham's second most successful decade, albeit coming up short in european competitions at early stages.

The 90s would see the stars of the team leave one by one. Seaman to Arsenal, Ince to Bobby Robson's Manchester United, Limpar to Everton and Tony Cottee to Leicester City sent West Ham into a rebuild phase.

Thankfully, it wouldn't last for long, for new manager Harry Redknapp inherited a brilliant generation of young talents emerging from the academy: the likes of Rio Ferdinand, John Terry, Joe Cole, Kieran Richardson, Glen Johnson, Jermaine Defoe, Michael Carrick and Frank Lampard all made their debut for the club in the late 90s and early 00s, with a surprise intertoto triumph the humble beginnings of the club's greatest years. An FA Cup win in 2003 was followed by a cup-winners cup triumph against Michael Ballack's Bayer Leverkusen, while the arrival of European cup winning manager Jose Mourinho and czech Goalkeeper Petr Cech coincided with teh golden generation hitting their prime at the same time.

From.then on, West Hame would dominate the 2000s, winning back-to-back league titles in 2005 and 2006, league cups in 2005 and 2007 and back to back FA Cups in 2006 and 2007, with the culination bejng a cup treble, as they defeated Olympique Lyonnais in the 2007 european cup final for their first and only time. Even a change in manager didn't stop West Ham, for Carlo Ancelotti would win the 2010 and 2013 league titles, along with an FA Cup in 2010 and 2012 and a league cup and the cup winners cup for another treble in their first ever season at their current home, the london stadium, in 2012-2013.

The last dance for that generation would be 2014-2015, where the club would win the league cup, but bow out in thenleague to Mauricio Pocchettino and Gareth Bale's Southampton. Since then, West Ham has been declining and going on a rebuild, with the likes of Reece Oxford, Michael Antonio, Manuel Lanzini, Ben Johnson, and Declan Rice leading the current team.


So yeah, with fergie sacked in 1990, no skysports and no blood money in football, things are...quite different in my world 😎
I love that 😀
 
Wish I had the time and effort to do a Raith Rovers one, as in what if their 90s glory days kept going into the 2000s.
 
1200px-West_Ham_United_FC_logo.svg.png

Name: West Ham United Football Club
City: London
Nickname: The Hammers
Founded: 29 june 1895, as Thames Ironworks
Venue: London Stadium
Capacity: 62, 500
League: Football League 1st division


HONORS

Domestic:
First Division:
1985-1986, 2004-2005, 2005-2006, 2009-2010, 2012-2013

Second Division: 1980-1981

FA Cup:
1963-1964, 1974-1975, 1988-1989, 2002-2003, 2005-2006, 2006-2007, 2009-2010, 2011-2012,

League Cup: 1965-1966, 1986-1987, 1989-1990, 2004-2005, 2006-2007, 2012-2013, 2014-2015

European

European Cup: 2006-2007

Cup Winners cup:
1964-1965, 2003-2004, 2012-2013

Intertoto Cup: 1999


In this world, the west london club is one of the msot successful clubs of the modern era. After their first taste of major glory in both domestic and european cup competitions in the 1960s, with a squad led by future world cup winners Bobby Moore and Geoff Hirst, the club would suffer through relegation in the 70s despite winning a secodn FA Cup in 1975 and a fonals appearance in the 1976 edition of the cup winners cup.

Winning promotion in 1981, west ham quietly build a good side featuring tony gale, alvin martin and academy products alan dickens and Tony Cottee. The 1985-1986 season sees West ham emerge as a huge underdog contender for the league title against the powerhouse liverpool and everton sides, eventually winning their first ever first division title on the last day of the season after an undefeated second half of the season.

The late 80s would mark the first golden age of West Ham, with Cottee, Martin, Gale and Dickens being joined by fellow academy graduates Paul Ince, George Parris and Steve Potts as well as shrewd signings like Birmingham's David Seaman, AC Milan's returning englishmen Mark Hately and Ray Wilkins and their first ever foreign star in swede Anders Limpar. Two league cups in 1987 and 1990 and a third FA Cup in 1989, along with exploits agains the mighty liverpool in said cup finals as well as overcoming a 3-0 deficit agaisnt Oldham in the semi-finals of the 1990 league cup marked west ham's second most successful decade, albeit coming up short in european competitions at early stages.

The 90s would see the stars of the team leave one by one. Seaman to Arsenal, Ince to Bobby Robson's Manchester United, Limpar to Everton and Tony Cottee to Leicester City sent West Ham into a rebuild phase.

Thankfully, it wouldn't last for long, for new manager Harry Redknapp inherited a brilliant generation of young talents emerging from the academy: the likes of Rio Ferdinand, John Terry, Joe Cole, Kieran Richardson, Glen Johnson, Jermaine Defoe, Michael Carrick and Frank Lampard all made their debut for the club in the late 90s and early 00s, with a surprise intertoto triumph the humble beginnings of the club's greatest years. An FA Cup win in 2003 was followed by a cup-winners cup triumph against Michael Ballack's Bayer Leverkusen, while the arrival of European cup winning manager Jose Mourinho and czech Goalkeeper Petr Cech coincided with teh golden generation hitting their prime at the same time.

From.then on, West Hame would dominate the 2000s, winning back-to-back league titles in 2005 and 2006, league cups in 2005 and 2007 and back to back FA Cups in 2006 and 2007, with the culination bejng a cup treble, as they defeated Olympique Lyonnais in the 2007 european cup final for their first and only time. Even a change in manager didn't stop West Ham, for Carlo Ancelotti would win the 2010 and 2013 league titles, along with an FA Cup in 2010 and 2012 and a league cup and the cup winners cup for another treble in their first ever season at their current home, the london stadium, in 2012-2013.

The last dance for that generation would be 2014-2015, where the club would win the league cup, but bow out in thenleague to Mauricio Pocchettino and Gareth Bale's Southampton. Since then, West Ham has been declining and going on a rebuild, with the likes of Reece Oxford, Michael Antonio, Manuel Lanzini, Ben Johnson, and Declan Rice leading the current team.


So yeah, with fergie sacked in 1990, no skysports and no blood money in football, things are...quite different in my world 😎
Please do more of these, I would love to see other clubs in your world
 
Leeds Utd.
Please do more of these, I would love to see other clubs in your world

As requested 😉


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LEEDS UNITED FOOTBALL CLUB

Founded: 17 october 1919
City: Leeds
Nickname: The Whites, Dirty Leeds
Ground: Ellan Road
Attendance: 37,608
League: Football League 1st division

HONORS

DOMESTIC

First Division: 1964-1965, 1968-1969, 1970-1971, 1973-1974, 1978-1979, 1991-1992, 1999-2000, 2002-2003, 2008-2009

FA Cups: 1967-1968, 1969-1970, 1971-1972, 1972-1973, 1975-1976, 1976-1977, 1999-2000, 2001-2002

League Cup: 1967-1968, 1978-1979, 1979-1980, 1983-1984, 1997-1998, 1998-1999, 2002-2003

EUROPEAN

European Cup: 1974-1975, 2000-2001

UEFA Cup: 1967-1968

Cup Winners Cup: 1970-1971, 1973-1974, 1977-1978, 1980-1981, 2002-2003

after spending more than a decade building a strong club in a predominantly rugby town, Don Revie finally promoted Leeds United to the first division. With players like Johnny Giles, Jack Charlton and Billy Bremner and the returing club legend John Charles, Revie and the whites did the unthinkable in 1964-1965: winning the first sivision right after being promoted.

this spectacular triumph kickstarted the first golden age of Leeds United, where the club would basically win every trophy imaginable, the culmination of which would be the 1974-1975 european cup triumph agaisnt Bayern Munich in the final

however, the key difference here is that Revie actually stays with Leeds, preparing Johnny Giles as his future successor in the manager post, as well as successfully retooling the squad around younger talents such as graduates Gordon McQueen, Frank Gray, Byron Stevenson, Terry Yorath, John Lukic and Carl Harris along with his extensive scouting network across scotland nabbing him.the likes of Andy Gray and Gordon Strachan, and the shrewd signings of Paul Hart, Graeme Souness and Brian Flynn, with the innovatove switch to a 4-3-3 inspired by the dutch national team leading the club to win more trophies in the late 70s, culminating in a lther league title in 1979 and the cup winners cup triumph in 1981.


Unfortunately, when it came to inheriting the post from Revie, Johnny Giles sadly couldn't manage to win anything, with the club entering a rebuild in the 80s with the departure of their stars, albeit staying up in the first division.

Howard Wilkinson would take over in 1988 and built a strong squad that brough them back to the top half of the table in the late 80s. The signing of disgruntled french forward Eric Cantona would push them over the top amd grab their first league in 14 years in 1991-1992.

However, the nasty row between the frenchman and Wilkinson forced the club to sell him to Liverpool after Manchester United used their last foreign player spot on danish goalkeeper Peter Schmeichel

From.then on, the club would stay in the first division, but stagnate into fighting for the UEFA Cup spots and stay fiddling their thumbs in mid-table, leading to wilkinson being sacked in 1996 and the hiring of former Manchester United, Hearts and Aston Villa manager Alex Ferguson.

It was under Ferguson that leeds would go through their best period of success since the Don Revie era. With youth products such as Ian Harte, Gary Kelly, Jonathan Woodgate, Paul Robinson, Harry Kewell and Lee Bowyer joinging established squad members gary speed and David Batty, as well as shrewd signings like Alf-Inge Haaland, Mark Viduka, Jesper Blomqvist and especially Henrik Larsson, Leeds would win two consecutive league cups in 1998 and 1999 before clinching the league cup doubke in 1999-2000.

The greatest achievement, however, would be overcoming the likes of valencia and Bayer Leverkusen to win the club's second and last champions league title in 2001, before winning the FA Cup in 2002 and completing a treble in 2002-2003, winning the first division, league cup and cup winners cup, with youngsters like Robbie Keane and Alan Smith joining the ranks.

Later, the likes of Aaron Lennon, Nemanja Vidic, Patrice Evra and James Milner would join Keane and Smith in replacing the ageing early 00s core in the mid-00s. This retool led to Fergie and Leeds winning the crazy 4-horse title race of the 2008-2009 season.

It would prove to be the last title for Leeds and Alex Ferguson, for the latter would retire in 2013, and Leeds, since then, are now stuck in the mid-table of the first division, albeit with promising youngsters like Kalvin Phillips, Lewis Cook and Daniel James leading the youth movement of Leeds into the 2020s.
 
Euro 1996 (GeorgeUK)
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UEFA Euro 1996

Tournament details
Host country England
Dates 8–30 June
Teams 16
Venue(s) 8 (in 8 host cities)

Final positions
Winners: England (1st Title)
Runners-up: Czech Republic

Group Matches

"...Ally McCoist's late goal for Scotland against Switzerland ensured that Scotland would break their group stage duck for the first time in their history, consigning the Netherlands to a group stage exit..."

Quarter Finals and Semi Finals
"France and Scotland also played out a 0–0 draw, with France winning the penalty shootout 5–4."

"The other semi-final was a repeat of the 1990 World Cup semi-final between Germany and England. Alan Shearer headed in after three minutes to give his side the lead, but Stefan Kuntz evened the score less than 15 minutes later, and the score remained 1–1 after 90 minutes. In extra time, Paul Gascoigne scored a golden goal, when he turned a cross from Shearer into the empty goal..."

Final
"...Alan Shearer scored either side of half time, with Teddy Sheringham increasing England's lead just before the hour mark. Despite a late Pavel Nedved penalty, England would be crowned Champions for the first time..."
 
Real Sociedad
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Name: Real Sociedad de Futbol
City: San Sebastian
Nickname: La Real, Txuki-Urdinak (the blue and whites)
Founding: 7th september 1909
Ground: Anoeta Stadium
Capacity: 39,500
League: La Liga

HONORS

DOMESTIC

La Liga: 1979-1980, 1980-1981, 1981-1982, 2002-2003, 2019-2020

Segunda Division: 1948-1949, 1966-1967, 2009-2010

Copa del Rey: 1927-1928, 1986-1987, 1987-1988, 1989-1990, 2022-2023

EUROPEAN

Cup Winners Cup: 1987-1988, 1988-1989, 1990-1991


Real Sociedad Is one of the prominent clubs of the basque region, alongside eternal rivals Athletic Bilbao.

throughout its history, Real Sociedad adhered to a similar policy as their rivals, in that they only fielded players from the basque region. Of course, unlike Bilbao, who went on to achieve great success in spanish football's early years, San Sebastian only has a copa del rey in 1928 to show for it, with the club frequently yo-yoing between la liga and the second division in the following decades.

however, promotion in 1967 was followed with much needed stability, with the club forming a strong, defensive side that gradually grew stronger in the 70s. Then, once the powerhouses of the 70s, which were Alfredo Di Stefano's Valencia, Luis Aragones's Atletico Madrid and Johna Cruyff's Barcelona, all endered their decline, San Sebastian capitalised on it by orchestrating a three peat from 1980 to 1982, a grand period which culminated in their Europena cup final defeat in 1981 against the mighty Liverpool.

following that period, the club's star players began aging, and the club would find it self relegated to mid-table finish until the mid 80s. It was then that San Sebastian proceeded to two of its most improtant decisions in club history: not only signing Welsh manager John Toshack, but also, at his request, finally ditching the cantera policy and bringing in their first ever foreign player signing in Irishman John Aldridge at the 1987 january transfer window.

with Aldridge in tow, along with new blood from the cantera such as Jose Mari Bakero, Txiki Beguiristain and Luis Lopez Rekarte as well as the extremely ambitious and controversial transfer of Bilbao's star striker Julio Salinas, Toshack and Sociedad would win the copa del rey for the first time in almost 40 years in 1987, leading them to compete in the cup winners cup. Boosted by shrewd signings such as everton's kevin richardson and Osasuna's Jon Goikotxea, San Sebastian would enter a golden age, finishing as runner-up in la liga in 1987-1988 and winning three cup winners cup in four seasons (1988, 1989 and 1991), with the club constantly finishing in the top 4 of La Liga every year and playing a scintillating brand of football.

Toshack's departure in 1994 for Real Madrid signaled the end of San Sebastian's golden age, and a painful rebuild would follow. Then, in the early 00s, Toshack would be brought back. This time, with a sociedad team that looked more like a mid-table side than the constant title contenders he built in the late 80s and early 90s, with local talents Igor Gabilondo, Mikel Arteta and Xabi Alondo being surrounded by veterans such as Sander Westerveld, Gabriel Schurer, Valeri Karpin and the striker duo of Nihat and Darko Kovacevic.

however, that is not knowing how spirited a manager John Toshack was, and the welshman would work miracles again as he dragged this side kicking and screaming into a cinderella title run in 2002-2003, where the team, playing way over its head, miraculously defeated the galacticos of Real Madrid for an improbable 4th la liga title.

unfortunately, the good times would quickly come to an end, as Toshack would once again leave to manage Wales ahead of Euro 2004, and the likes of Xabi Alonso and Mikel Arteta would move one to have very successful careers at Real Madrid and Everton and Arsenal, respectively, while Bilbao would finally avenge the Julio Salinas transfer from 20 years ago by snapping Igor Gabilondo as a free agent in 2006. This, combined with a downturn in finances, would condemn the club to relegation in 2007.

three years later, however, carried by some great youngsters, chief among them asier illaramendi, Yuri Berchiche and Antoine Griezmann, San Sebastian would be back in the big times, being promoted in 2010 and building up a strong and prmoising side around Illaramendi and Griezmann throughout the decade, with the likes of Inigo Martinez, Diego Llorente, Alvaro Odriozola, Mikel Merino and Mikel Oyarzabal joining them along with shrewd foreign signings like Geronimo Rulli, Willian José, Adnan Januzaj, Alexander Isak and especially Martin Odegaard on loan from Real Madrid.

it would be the arrival of the legendary Carlo Ancelotti behind the bench, however, that the puzzle would finally be assembled, as Ancelotti build his attack around Odegaard sitting behind the attacking trio of Griezman, Oyarzabal and Willian José/Isak, which terrorised La Liga and took advantage of the decline of Barcelona and the rebuild of Real Madrid to beat Sevilla, Atletico and Valencia to the 2019-2020 la liga title, their 5th ever.

the Ancelotti era would end in 2023, when the Italian manager would leave for the Brazil National Team after winning the Copa Del Rey, with the squad now beginning to feel the weight of age

and, of course, since we're talking about san sebastian:

 
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Valencia
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Name: Valencia Club de Futbol
Nicknames: Los Che (the bats)
City: Valencia
Ground: Estadio Mestalla
capacity: 49,430
League: La Liga

HONOURS

DOMESTIC

La Liga: 1941-1942, 1943-1944, 1947-1948, 1948-1949, 1952-1953, 1970-1971, 1971-1972, 2001-2002, 2003-2004, 2004-2005, 2005-2006

Copa Del Rey: 1933-1934, 1940-1941, 1942-1943, 1943-1944, 1944-1945, 1948-1949, 1951-1952, 1953-1954, 1966-1967, 1969-1970, 1970-1971, 1971-1972, 1978-1979, 1992-1993, 1998-1999, 2007-2008, 2016-2017, 2018-2019

EUROPEAN

European Cup: 2002-2003

UEFA Cup: 1961-1962, 1962-1963

Cup Winners cup: 1979-1980, 1999-2000, 2008-2009

Valencia Club de Futbol are the third most successful club in Spanish football, behind Barcelona and Real Madrid, and went through multiple periods of success, with the most notable being the war years in the 40s, the 1970s, where Alfredo Di Stefano coached the team to back-to-back liga-copa doubles and the cup winners cup in 1979-1980, as well as the Rafa Benitez years, where the club would take advantage of the decline of the Real Madrid Galacticos and the struggles of Barcelona to dominate the early-to-mid 00s with stars like Gaizka Mendieta, Ruben Baraja, David Albelda, Roberto Ayala, Pablo Aimar, Santiago Canizares, Vicente and, later, Raul Albiol, David Villa, David Silva and Juan Mata, winning almsot every trophy imaginable, culminating in the european cup triumph in 2003 against Bayer Leverkusen, until Benitez left the club in 2010.

with Albiol, Mata and Silva leading the 2010s, along with new talents like Isco, Paco Alcacer, Jose gaya, joao Cancelo, Nicolas Otamendi, Diego Alves, Norberto Neto, Geoffrey Kondogbia and Goncalo Guedes under the leadership of Vicenzo Montella and, later, Marcelino, Valencia would win copa delreys in 2016-2017 and 2018-2019 before both Mata and Silva left, with marcelino retooling around Alcacer, Gaya, Isco and Guedes, with Academy graduates like carlos soler, ferran torres and hugo Guillamon as well as the free agent signing of Antonio Rudiger meant that Valencia is set to contend for domestic and european honours over the 2020s.
 
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Dresdner SC: Modern era and stats
Consolidation (1998-2006)

Following the 1997/98 disaster, where Dresdner SC finished 16th in the Bundesliga, the Friedrichstadters would for the first time since the 1968/69 play in the second tier of German Football. Optimism was high, though, and the slogan "Wir kommen wieder" (we're coming back), was adopted. But, the 1998/1999 Season in the 2nd Bundesliga was a disaster, and Dresden immediately fall to the third tier of German Football in Regionalliga, where the club would spend the next five years in. After a whole decade of financial mismanagement, the club had obviously collapsed, and Dresden was now wallowing in the Regionalliga, while its early 90s generation that had carried the team through the decade disbanded. Despite that, the club had broken attendance records for the Regionalliga, and 2004 saw Dresden returning to the 2nd Bundesliga, and the signings of Klemen Lavric, Ansgar Brinkmann, Daniel Ernemann, Ranislav Jovanović and Joshua Kennedy saw the club taking steps to establish themselves back in the German top flight.

As expected, the first season in the 2nd Bundesliga saw the club fight for survival, although the euphoric start against MSV Duisburg saw the club reaching as high as 5th during the season, but a Stagnation in results led to the club only finishing 7th - safe from relegation. The next season saw the club reach even greater heights as they were consistently winning at home, but their away matches led to the Friedrichstadters constantly playing ping-pong with the other Teams fighting for promotion. Eventually, Dresden managed to place themselves 3rd in the Table, thus Qualifying for the Bundesliga after an 10 year long absence.

Dresdner SC's players celebrating with their fans
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Modern Era and return to Europe (2007-Present)
The first two seasons in the top flight saw Dresden struggle, with the club struggling for results, especially in away matches. The 2007/08 season saw Dresdner SC finish 15th, just narrowly missing out on relegation, before slightly improving the next season with a 13th spot. In 2009, the Rudolf Harbig Stadium, which had been Dresden's home ground since the very beginning was modernised into a state of the art venue, with a 32 thousand capacity. The opening match on the brand new stadium was against reigning champions Schalke 04, which ended in a 2-2 draw.
The new Rudolf Harbig Stadium
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For most of the Early 2010s, Dresden was struggling in the Highest Level of German football, with the Friedrichstadters constantly either battling relegation or staying in the middle of the championship table. The 2012/13 season saw Dresden holding onto the Bundesliga by a thread, but the club managed to stay up after winning the Promotion play-off against 1st FC Cologne. 2014/15 finally saw some crucial improvement as Dresden won the DFB Pokal against Borussia Dortmund, thus ending a 21 year long drought. However, the final saw Dresden's fans once again showing excess violence, hooliganism and use of pyrotechnics, thus leading to the club being punished by the DFB by playing five games behind closed doors.
Alle nach Dortmund! - Everyone to Dortmund!
A message by the fans for the DFB Pokal Final

The 2015/16 season saw Dresden play in the Europa League for the first time since 1989, and the team managed to finish 3rd in their group which consisted of Krasnodar, PAOK and HJK.

As of the 2023/24 season, Dresdner SC is a relatively stable, if inconsistent team with an occasional flash of brilliance. Nonetheless, the club had remained the most popular of the Saxony region, and the club also played a large role in helping Borussia Dortmund dethrone Bayern Munich in the 2022/23 season, with Ahmet Arslan scoring a spectacular free kick against Bayern in the dying minutes, which was also Dresden's first Home win against Bayern since 2017.
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Honours:
Domestic:

German Football Championship: 1941, 1943, 1944, 1953
Bundesliga: 1972/73, 1983/84, 1989/90
Tschammerpokal/DFB Pokal: 1940, 1941, 1943, 1957/58, 1970/71, 1976/77, 1983/84, 1993/94, 2014/15
DFL Super Pokal: 1990, 2015
Gauliga Sachsen: 1933–34, 1938–39, 1939–40, 1940–41, 1942–43, 1943–44
Amateurliga: 1964/65
Mittledeutsche Meisterschaft: 1905, 1926, 1929, 1930, 1931, 1933
Oberliga: 1952/53
Regionalliga Nordost: 1968/69
Regionalliga: 2003/04
2. Oberliga: 1950/51

International:
European Cup:
Runners-up (1973/74)
European Cup Winners Cup: Runners-up (1971/72)
UEFA Cup/Europa League: Semi-final (1978/79, 1988/89)
 
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Torino FC
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Name: Torino Football Club
Nicknames: Il Toro (The Bull), I Granata (The Maroons), Il Vecchio Cuore Granata (The Old Maroon Heart)
Founded: 3 December 1906 (as Foot-Ball Club Torino)
City: Torino
Stadium: Stadio Comunale
Capacity: 27, 958
League: Serie A

Honours:

Domestic (29):


Serie A (14): 1926/27, 1927/28, 1942/43, 1945/46, 1946/47, 1947/48, 1948/49, 1952/53, 1954/55, 1957/58, 1971/72, 1975/76, 1976/77, 1991/92

Coppa Italia (12): 1935/36, 1942/43, 1959/60, 1963/64, 1964/65, 1967/68, 1970/71, 1971/72, 1980/81, 1981/82, 1992/93, 2016/17

Supercoppa Italiana (1): 2017

Intercontinental (2):

European Cup: Runners-up (1955/56, 1992/93)
European Cup Winners' Cup (1): Winners (1960/61)
UEFA Cup/Europa League (1): Winners (1991/92)
Latin Cup: Runners-up (1953)


Torino FC is the third most successful club in Italian football, with its first title coming in 1926/27, before taking its second consecutive title a year later. Before the war, the club a largely succesful side, but always behind their local rivals Juventus. The club then entered its golden years during the second World War, when the "Grande Torino" squad was established with players such as Aldo Ballarin, Valerio Bacigalupo, Pietro Ferraris, Luigi Ferrero and Eusebio Castigliano, with a large number of the players forming the Italian National Team of the post-war period. That period saw Torino's finest years, with the club winning 4 titles in a row from 1945 to 1949 and participating in the Latin Cup, where they finished as runners-up in 1953. Further successes came in the 50s, where I Granata achieved a finals appearance in the inaugural European Cup season after winning against Sparta Prague and Barcelona.

Grande Torino Squad
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While the later 50s did see a slight regression in form, Torino still managed to win 4 cups in the 60s along with the European Cup Winners' Cup in 1961. The mid 60s saw the emergence of one of Torino's greatest players in Gigi Meroni, and further success came in the 70s with taking a double in 1971/72. Torino's greatest successes during this period came in the 1971/72 and 1972/73 seasons, where it reached the semi-finals of the Cup winners cup and European Cup respectively, along with two consecutive scudettos in 1975/76 and 1976/77. Following two consecutive Coppa Italias in the early 80s, Torino went on to struggle for the rest of the decade, only reaching occasional appearances in the UEFA Cup, which they ended up winning in 1991/92 against a mighty Ajax side, courtersy to Walter Casagrande. That very same year, Torino also won their last Scudetto, thus reaching the Final of the European Cup in 1993 where they lost to Rangers, and won a Coppa Italia that same year.

Casagrande celebrating against Real Madrid
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But, after reaching the quarter-finals of the 1993/94 Cup Winners Cup, Torino's finances collapsed, and the club fell to Serie B, before returning in 1998. Since then, Torino had remained a largely unstable side in Serie A, with their best finish being a 7th. Although the results aren't ideal, a triumph in the 2016/17 Coppa Italia against their main rival Juventus brought a sign of progress. As of now, Torino FC is led by Split-born and former Hajduk Split Coach Ivan Jurić, and is consisted of players Nikola Vlašić, Samuele Ricci, Alessandro Buongiorno, Pietro Pellegri, Valentino Lazzaro, Nemanja Radonjić, Ricardo Rodriguez, Antonio Sanabria and Ivan Ilić.

Torino's players celebrating their Coppa Italia win in 2017
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Olympique de Marseille
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Name: Olympique de Marseille
City: Marseille
Nickname: L'OM, Les Phocéens (the phoceans), Les Minots (the youngsters)
Stadium: Stade Velodrome
 Capacity
: 67,394
League: Ligue 1

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HONOURS

DOMESTIC

Ligue 1: 1934, 1936-1937, 1937-1938, 1938-1939, 1947-1948, 1955-1956, 1970-1971, 1971-1972, 1988-1989 1989-1990, 1990-1991, 1991-1992, 1992-1993, 2008-2009, 2009-2010, 2014-2015

Coupe de France: 1918, 1923, 1924, 1925, 1926, 1927, 1934, 1935, 1937-1938, 1939-1940, 1953-1954, 1968-1969, 1970-1971, 1971-1972, 1975-1976, 1988-1989, 2005-2006, 2006-2007

Coupe de la ligue: 2009-2010, 2010-2011, 2011-2012, 2017-2018

EUROPEAN

European Cup: 1992-1993

UEFA Cup: 2003-2004

Cup Winners Cup: 2007-2008

Olympique de Marseille are the most successful club in French Football history, with 26 titles won in total. Originally a rugby club, les phocéens switched to football in 1902. At the time, there was no national league competitions, and the coupe de france served essentilly as the national championship.


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the 1920s Marseille sqaud, the first golden age of the club

marseille would win its first major title in 1918 befofe embarking a successful decade in the 20s, led by french internationals joseph alcazar, jean boyer and jules dewaquez, winning 5 consecutive cups.

marseille turned professional in 1931, joining the union of professional clubs, which sought to found France's first national league. Armed with talented youngsters like Mario Zatelli and the moroccan sensation Larbi Ben Barek, as well as brazilian keeper Jaguare, Marseille would dominate the last years before the nazi invasion of France, forcing the likes of Zatelli and Ben Barek to find refuge in foreign clubs.


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Larbi Ben Barek, playing for France


after the war ended, Zatelli and ben barek came back to win marseille the 1947-1948 french first division title, before Ben Barek left again, this time, for atletico madrid. The 50s would see marseille, led by swedish marksman Gunnar Andersson and local.hero Roger Scotti, claim a cup in 1954 and a league title in 1956 before undertaking a long rebuild that ended in the 60s, when Marcel Leclerc bought the club and brought it back to prominence. With french internationals like Jean Djorkaeff, Bernard Bosquier, Georges Carnus and Jules Zvunka and foreigners like swedish winger roger magnusson, Malian Salif Keita and croatian Striker Josip Skoblar, the club would return to the top half of the table, winning the 1968-1969 coupe de france.


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Skoblar and Magnusson


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Jairzinho arriving in Marseille


the shock arrival of world champion Jairzinho in 1970 brought Marseille over the top, as they defeated the powerhouses of the time in saint-etienne, Nice and Nantes to win back to back domestic doubles in 1971 and 1972. The latter year saw the club reach the quarter-finals of the european cup for the first time in their history, and they did the exploit in defeating the mighty Ajax of Johan Cruyff 2-0 in the home leg. unfortunately, the return leg saw Cruyff score three in a 5-0 route in Amsterdam as Ajax went on to win their second consecutive european cup agaisnt Cagliari in the final.

the last hurrah of the marcel leclerc era saw Marseille win the 1975-1976 french cup before financial difficulties and an aging core forced them to enter a painful rebuild, which saw the club being relegated to the second division in the early 80s.

from that nadir, however, came much needed upgrades to the youth facilities, nurturing a young squad that led them back to the top division in 1984.


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Bernard Tapie, OM president from 1986 to 1994

the club's greatest ever chapter was written by one Bernard Tapie, owner of Adidas. Buying the club in 1986, his ambition was to make it the first french club since Bordeaux in 1985 to win the european cup. Shrewdly investing in top prospects like jocelyn angloma, Franck Sauzée, future france captain and manager Didier Deschamps, Basile Boli, Marcel Desailly and future 1991 ballon d'or winner Jean-Pierre Papina nd surrounding them with minots eric di meco, Christophe galtier and Frank Passi as well as foreigners Abedi Ayew, Carlos Mozer, Enzo Francescoli and Chris Waddle, Marseille would unexpectedly beat Arsene Wenger's monaco to a domestic double in 1988-1989, kickstarting a run of 5 consecutive french league titles and incredible runs in the european cup, heartbreakingly losing to Jugoslavia belgrade in 1991 after doing the exploit of beating Maradona's reigning double european champions Napoli in the semis before finally winning that european cup against AC Milan in 1993.

later in his life, Bernard tapie revealed that he planned on fixing the last match of the ligue 1 season against valenciennes in order for his players to not get hurt before the european cup final, but in the end, he ordered coach Raymond Goethals to simply send the B squad instead.

despite that run of success, Tapie's sale of adidas and the club meant that a long rebuild started, with most of the squad's stars going to play in Italy. Two close calls in 1998-1999, where robert pires almost carried them to the ligue 1 and the UEFA Cup double ended up being a fluke, and marseille would go up and down the standings for much of the early 00s until former player Didier Deschamps, fresh off receiving his coaching badges, was hired by new president Robert-Louis Dreyfus.


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Didier Deschamps


little by little, Deschamps put the foundations of a winning culture at Marseille, playing a solid 4-3-3 formation and relying on a sturdy defense led by longstanding goalkeeper Fabien Barthez and central defenders William Gallas and Daniel Van Buyten, with the midfield being revamped with the likes of youth product Matthieu Flamini, former lillois Benoit Cheyrou and argentine maestro Lucho Gonzalez, with the electrifying duo of Florent Malouda and Didier Drogba coming in both from Guingamp to bolster the attack.

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Didier Drogba


while the 2003-2004 season saw Marseille stay far behind Wenger's Monaco, Ronaldinho's Paris and Gerard Houllier's Lyon in 4th, the club went on an epic run to the UEFA Cup Final, defeating the likes of Liverpool and Newcastle on the way to meeting the galacticos of Real Madrid. After being led 4-2 at half time with Raul and Zidane running roughshod, Deschamps delivered a legendary speech to the locker room that galvanized the team, scoring 3 unanswered goals in a massive comeback, with Drogba scoring a brace as Marseille won their first trophy in 11 years 5-4.

from then on, the club went from strength to streght, with the addidtions of youngsters franck ribery, Taye Taiwo and mathieu Valbuena as well as youth product Samir Nasri bolstering the ranks. Marseille would win back to back french cups in 2006 and 2007, the latter being notable for an exploit where a team composed of young prospects maanged to defeat Paris 1-0, before winning the 2008 cup winners cup against Tottenham in the final.


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Franck Ribéry in the 2008 cup winners cup final​


the consecration finally arrived as Deschamps, drogba and co finally won ligue 1 back to back in 2009 and 2010. The european cup campaign of 2009-2010 saw marseille losin in the semi-final to barcelona in a highly controversial return leg, where the referee refused no more than 6 clear penalties for Marseille, with andres iniesta's away goal being enough to send the blaugrana through to the final. That night was infamous not only for the atrocipus refereeing, but also for Drogba calling this match a fucking disgrace live on camera.

the consolation prize for this screwjob was winning three consecutive league cups from 2010 to 2012. the latter year would see Drogba leave for Galatasaray, along with the old guard of Van Buyten and Gallas leaving as free agents. Finally, Didier Deschamps would leave for the coaching job at the france national team in 2013, with Rudi Garcia, of 2011 ligue 1 champions lille, taking over.

the crowning achievement of Garcia's tenure was the 2014-2015 season, where Marseille would embark on a dominant campaign, only losing twice and dominating in almost every category. Steve Mandanda kept the most clean sheets, while the defense of benjamin mendy, cesar azpilicueta, nicolas n'koulou and Laurent Koscielny conceding the least goals, while andre-pierre Gignac ended up as top scorer with 25 goals and free agent signing Dimitri Payet ending up as top assistant

with André Ayew and Gignac leaving as free agents, Garcia repalced them with Payet on the left wing and young belgian Michy Batshuayi, with free agent Kevin Strootman signing from Roma to partner Gianneli Imbula and youth product Maxime Lopez in the midfield.

this squad in 2017-2018 would finish runner up behind Monaco in 2nd place in the league, while they would go all the way to the final in the league cup and UEFA Cup. While they would win the league cup, they would come up short in the UEFA cup to a sublime Karim Benzema and Lyon side 3-0 at Lyon's home ground of Stade Gerland.

since then, Rudi Garcia left the club and marseille is now retooling, with a bright, young squad managed by Jorge Sampaoli featuring the likes of Duje Caleta-Car, Boubacar Kamara, Maxime Lopez, Mendy, Pol Lirola, Batshuayi, Thauvin, Ibrahima Sangaré, Ismaila Sarr, Pau Lopez and Matteo Guendouzi.


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Dimitri Payet and Andre-Pierre Gignac during the 2014-2015 season.
 
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Name: Torino Football Club
Nicknames: Il Toro (The Bull), I Granata (The Maroons), Il Vecchio Cuore Granata (The Old Maroon Heart)
Founded: 3 December 1906 (as Foot-Ball Club Torino)
City: Torino
Stadium: Stadio Comunale
Capacity: 27, 958
League: Serie A

Stadio Comunale
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Torino FC is the third most successful club in Italian football, with its first title coming in 1926/27, before taking its second consecutive title a year later. Before the war, the club a largely succesful side, but always behind their local rivals Juventus. The club then entered its golden years during the second World War, when the "Grande Torino" squad was established with players such as Aldo Ballarin, Valerio Bacigalupo, Pietro Ferraris, Luigi Ferrero and Eusebio Castigliano, with a large number of the players forming the Italian National Team of the post-war period. That period saw Torino's finest years, with the club winning 4 titles in a row from 1945 to 1949 and participating in the Latin Cup, where they finished as runners-up in 1953. Further successes came in the 50s, where I Granata achieved a finals appearance in the inaugural European Cup season after winning against Sparta Prague and Barcelona.

Grande Torino Squad
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While the later 50s did see a slight regression in form, Torino still managed to win 4 cups in the 60s along with the European Cup Winners' Cup in 1961. The mid 60s saw the emergence of one of Torino's greatest players in Gigi Meroni, and further success came in the 70s with taking a double in 1971/72. Torino's greatest successes during this period came in the 1971/72 and 1972/73 seasons, where it reached the semi-finals of the Cup winners cup and European Cup respectively, along with two consecutive scudettos in 1975/76 and 1976/77. Following two consecutive Coppa Italias in the early 80s, Torino went on to struggle for the rest of the decade, only reaching occasional appearances in the UEFA Cup, which they ended up winning in 1991/92 against a mighty Ajax side, courtersy to Walter Casagrande. That very same year, Torino also won their last Scudetto, thus reaching the Final of the European Cup in 1993 where they lost to Rangers, and won a Coppa Italia that same year.

Casagrande celebrating against Real Madrid
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But, after reaching the quarter-finals of the 1993/94 Cup Winners Cup, Torino's finances collapsed, and the club fell to Serie B, before returning in 1998. Since then, Torino had remained a largely unstable side in Serie A, with their best finish being a 7th. Although the results aren't ideal, a triumph in the 2016/17 Coppa Italia against their main rival Juventus brought a sign of progress. As of now, Torino FC is led by Split-born and former Hajduk Split Coach Ivan Jurić, and is consisted of players Nikola Vlašić, Samuele Ricci, Alessandro Buongiorno, Pietro Pellegri, Valentino Lazzaro, Nemanja Radonjić, Ricardo Rodriguez, Antonio Sanabria and Ivan Ilić.

Torino's players celebrating their Coppa Italia win in 2017
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Honours:
Domestic (27):


Serie A: 1926/27, 1927/28, 1942/43, 1945/46, 1946/47, 1947/48, 1948/49, 1952/53, 1954/55, 1957/58, 1971/72, 1975/76, 1976/77, 1991/92

Coppa Italia: 1935/36, 1942/43, 1959/60, 1963/64, 1964/65, 1967/68, 1970/71, 1971/72, 1980/81, 1981/82, 1992/93, 2016/17

Supercoppa Italiana: 2017
Intercontinental (2):
European Cup: Runners-up (1955/56)
European Cup Winners' Cup: Winners (1960/61)
UEFA Cup/Europa League: Winners (1991/92)
Latin Cup: Runners-up (1953)

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Shit, uh...am i allowed to post the results from my world for clubs already talked about?
 
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