Alternate Electoral Maps III

A look at some Forgotten No More content, this shows the 1924 U.S. Presidential Election. 1924 was a rocky year for the U.S., three states (Kentucky, North Carolina and Tennessee) had risen up in "rebellion" and a horde of other states had denounced the government of Fiorello la Guardia while maintaining their loyalty to the U.S.

The United States abandoned the Electoral College via the amendment process in the 1910s, replacing it with a two-round popular vote system wherein a majority of the PV was needed to win. If no candidate received a majority, a run-off was held between the top two vote getters. This was the last election held under the First Constitution of the United States. By 1924, the country was in severe crisis and on the verge of total collapse. Since 1912, there had been three elections but six Presidents. Three had been assassinated (Andrei Rabinovich, the first secular and jewish President, elected in 1912 and assassinated in 1915; W.E.B. Du Bois, the first black President, elected in 1920 and assassinated at his inauguration; and Willis C. Hawley, Du Bois VP who technically ascended to the Presidency upon Du Bois's death, but who succumbed to injuries from the same incident which killed Du Bois a short time thereafter). The chaos has been attributed by historians to a trifecta of rapid change that occurred in the U.S. at the end of the 19th century: massive and somewhat equitable economic growth; widespread social justice reform; and increasing centralization in the federal government and the executive (in particular) with little pushback from SCOTUS. Oscar Underwood ended up becoming President following the deaths of Du Bois and Hawley, but Director of Public Relations Jo Sugarsville increasingly became the voice of the administration by way of the Bureau of Public Relations. Underwood would resign in 1924 under pressure from Workers Party leadership that had fallen under Sugarsville's sway, replaced by his VP Fiorello La Guardia, who was meant to be a figurehead.

The Federalists united behind intellectual giant Nicholas Murray Butler and his calls for a Second Constitutional Convention. But the Workers splintered, many opposed Sugarsville's camp (the hardliners) who had grown increasingly authoritarian and were calling for bloody stamping out of the rebellious states. Sugarsville won the Workers Party's mainline nomination, but splinter tickets appeared, sending the election into chaos. The First Round was met with bloody and violent conflict across various states (Iowa's first round results were "thrown out" after severe irregularities) but from the chaos emerged Butler and Sugarsville. The Director and former Vice-President used the month leading up to the run-off to push for more chaos, even endorsing violence at the polls in the name of "protecting liberty and America." Oddly enough, he gave his final national broadcast on October 31, 1924, two days prior to Run-Off Election Day. All the Workers splinter groups coalesced behind the Federalist ticket, denouncing the power grab and authoritarianism of Sugarsville.

Butler won the run-off in extraordinary fashion, taking over 60% of the vote and winning all but three states. It would be revealed only after the run-off results were known that Sugarsville had been placed on house arrest by President La Guardia facing charges of conspiracy against the United States. The extent of Sugarsville's crimes would be slowly leaked to the press, but Sugarsville would never face a jury - he hung himself on New Years Day.

First Round

1924 First Round Results.png


Second Round
1924 Run Off Results.png
 
Guess how I got this map.
guess how.PNG

It can be proven that an even number of states will vote Republican, regardless of the configuration. The proof is left as an exercise for the reader.
 
Just a quick idea I had for a 'UK as a US state' sort of map. Based the results off the 2019 election, basically with Tories + Brexit Party + UKIP +DUP & UUP making up the Republican vote, and everything else going to the Democrats. Also, assuming that the UK is to the left of US politics, as well as to shift the more Conservative leaning London suburbs to the left, I took a 10% swing from GOP to the Dems in most of the South, NI and Wales. In other place I only took a 5% swing, and in the NE and Scotland I left the vote shares as they were (in Scotland because everything is already extremely one-sided, in the NE to show the GOP doing better with traditionally Democrat, blue collar voters).

Lightest colour shade is a constituency won with less that 50% of the vote, second lightest a win with 50-60%, second darkest a win of between 60-70% and the darkest shade a victory over 70%.
State of GB 2020 Election.png

The end result is a large Democrat majority, popular vote margins are roughly 58% Dem - 42% GOP. The Democrats best performances is in and around Greater London, all major towns and cities (with the notable expiations of Stoke and Sunderland), and in the Celtic nations. The GOP does best in the East of England, although even here only in a single constituency do they have a vote share of over 70%.

What do y'all think? Realistically speaking, is the map too blue/too red? In hindsight I think its possible for the Democrats to do even better than this in a national election, tough at the same time a more moderate GOP gubernatorial candidate probably could still pull back many of those suburban voters in the South East.
 
I don't know enough about the subject to give feedback on the politics. I do think that, were it in the US, the UK would almost certainly be split up into 5 states at minimum - Scotland, Wales, S England, N England, Northern Ireland, and probably several others.
 
Just a quick idea I had for a 'UK as a US state' sort of map. Based the results off the 2019 election, basically with Tories + Brexit Party + UKIP +DUP & UUP making up the Republican vote, and everything else going to the Democrats. Also, assuming that the UK is to the left of US politics, as well as to shift the more Conservative leaning London suburbs to the left, I took a 10% swing from GOP to the Dems in most of the South, NI and Wales. In other place I only took a 5% swing, and in the NE and Scotland I left the vote shares as they were (in Scotland because everything is already extremely one-sided, in the NE to show the GOP doing better with traditionally Democrat, blue collar voters).

Lightest colour shade is a constituency won with less that 50% of the vote, second lightest a win with 50-60%, second darkest a win of between 60-70% and the darkest shade a victory over 70%.
View attachment 641546
The end result is a large Democrat majority, popular vote margins are roughly 58% Dem - 42% GOP. The Democrats best performances is in and around Greater London, all major towns and cities (with the notable expiations of Stoke and Sunderland), and in the Celtic nations. The GOP does best in the East of England, although even here only in a single constituency do they have a vote share of over 70%.

What do y'all think? Realistically speaking, is the map too blue/too red? In hindsight I think its possible for the Democrats to do even better than this in a national election, tough at the same time a more moderate GOP gubernatorial candidate probably could still pull back many of those suburban voters in the South East.
It’s a very interesting concept, whilst the UK is to the left of the USA in policy terms I feel the map is slightly too blue but that’s personal preference. The UK would probably be devolved amongst historical kingdoms that her than the EU boundaries and other constituent nations. Northern Ireland would be much more red as it is closest to America in a lot of policy terms once you remove the nationalist and unionist movements. North East Scotland is probably more red along with the rural parts of England and Wales. The Welsh Valleys would be interesting as they are socially conservative but economically liberal. London is probably a little too blue but you never know how it may go.

But overall I think you have done a very good job.
 
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