Alternate Electoral Maps III

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this started as a test to see how much territory virginia could hold while being democratic
442 to 70
 
My first-ever completed map, cross-posted in the main maps thread! This is the 2017 election in the Kingdom of Batavia, which is a successor state to Lotharingia in the European timeline on which I am currently working and hope to post soon.
04PaEpv.png


Questions and feedback are encouraged!
 

Gust

Donor
My first-ever completed map, cross-posted in the main maps thread! This is the 2017 election in the Kingdom of Batavia, which is a successor state to Lotharingia in the European timeline on which I am currently working and hope to post soon.
04PaEpv.png


Questions and feedback are encouraged!
With those numbers it'd be pretty likely that the blue party would sweep the single-member seats. In my own simulator they should earn more than 2/3 of those seats.
 
With those numbers it'd be pretty likely that the blue party would sweep the single-member seats. In my own simulator they should earn more than 2/3 of those seats.
They're hurt in part by a lot of the red seats being heavily urbanized; in some they can come close, but there's just too much of an advantage their for Labour. But it's something I'll take a look at, definitely!

Out of curiosity, how do you simulate out FPTP seat counts from a pop vote figure? Is there a formula?
 

Gust

Donor
They're hurt in part by a lot of the red seats being heavily urbanized; in some they can come close, but there's just too much of an advantage their for Labour. But it's something I'll take a look at, definitely!

Out of curiosity, how do you simulate out FPTP seat counts from a pop vote figure? Is there a formula?
Excel spreadsheet with the random function. It's not perfect though since it ignores the fact that different parties can be more popular in different areas. There is no real formula for it though I might publish the way I do it.
 
Excel spreadsheet with the random function. It's not perfect though since it ignores the fact that different parties can be more popular in different areas. There is no real formula for it though I might publish the way I do it.
Cool, good to know. If you do post it, please tag me; I'd love to take a look. Been looking for some way to model FPTP results when I don't have a set idea of where parties' strength lies!
 
Here’s an interesting idea for a map. It’s Alabama which compares Obama’s performance by total number of votes in both 2008 in 2012.

e1cg7N8.png
 

Gust

Donor
@msmp
I suppose I might as well release my FPTP simulator. It's basically a big excel randomizer. Each individual seat is simulated. For each seat, the party with the higher number wins. The number is equal to the base% (0-100) and a random whole number between -20 and 20. This creates an effect where the largest party gets a seat bonus.
This does however assume that all districts are similar. For a better simulation, you'd simulate different regions with their own base percentages. I actually did this with the Canadian provinces and the overall results are very similar to the real world results.
Hope it's fine to post it here since I don't know where else I'd post it.
Link
 
My first-ever completed map, cross-posted in the main maps thread! This is the 2017 election in the Kingdom of Batavia, which is a successor state to Lotharingia in the European timeline on which I am currently working and hope to post soon.
04PaEpv.png


Questions and feedback are encouraged!
What are the boundaries for the four regions?
 
What are the boundaries for the four regions?
The Netherlands and Belgium share the same border as OTL, Luxembourg consists of the OTL grand duchy and the Belgian province of Luxemburg, and Moselrhein consists of the whole of OTL Saarland, the Palatinate, Rheinhessen, the area immediately surrounding Wiesbaden in Hesse, and the Eifel portion of the southern Rhineland. I'll clarify the borders in the next update, since I see now they are a bit unclear!
@msmp
I suppose I might as well release my FPTP simulator. It's basically a big excel randomizer. Each individual seat is simulated. For each seat, the party with the higher number wins. The number is equal to the base% (0-100) and a random whole number between -20 and 20. This creates an effect where the largest party gets a seat bonus.
This does however assume that all districts are similar. For a better simulation, you'd simulate different regions with their own base percentages. I actually did this with the Canadian provinces and the overall results are very similar to the real world results.
Hope it's fine to post it here since I don't know where else I'd post it.
Link
This is really neat; thanks for sharing it!
 
Nah, with the economy the way it was and the Iran hostage crisis Ford would have won very decisively too. I meant how did I swing the results to get this specific map?
the democrats are more conservative, and the republicans have a good mix of both, which led to many conservatives and liberals both voting for the republicans?
 
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