Alternate Electoral Maps III

Federalist USA [Based on "Agrarian USA" by wolfhound817"
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[EDIT]: Forgot DC, which goes Federalist, making 168 electoral votes for them.
 
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Shaanxi province, home to Xi'an, the largest city in northwest China, is in some ways quite unusual in terms of its regional assembly. Not only is it fairly small, with only 69 members each elected to a FPTP district (akin in some ways to the provincial legislatures of Canada and state legislatures in Australia in this manner), but it is known for its political volatility and the fact that it is one of only three provinces where elections are not set to fixed terms but can be called by the premier whenever they wish, with a maximum five-year term limit that has only been served once in the province's history (from 2004 to 2009).

The other striking thing about the province, which was demonstrated by the 2016 election, is the relative strength of the minor parties compared to their larger rivals. This is in no small part due to the decline of both major parties after their most recent spells in government; the 2009 election saw the Kuomintang dislodged from office as the Great Recession hit home, and in the 2013 election, the Progressive government of Bai Enpei elected to replace the Kuomintang was defeated in a landslide, as Bai's administration was embroiled in a corruption scandal prior to losing a vote of confidence and went into the election with limited funds and poor polling numbers.

In both subsequent elections, the governments formed have been minorities with tacit support from within parliament. The 2013-16 Kuomintang government of Shangguan Jiqing comprised only 33 legislature members, but Kuomintang members were buoyed by their massive erosion of the Progressive strongholds of the northern and southeastern parts of the province, where the Progressives were virtually wiped out. This is another unusual element of Shaanxi- unlike the rest of the country, where they seem to be gradually getting closer to dislodging the Kuomintang's dominance in the party system, in Shaanxi the Progressives have slumped massively. A major factor in this is the growth in prominence of Xi'an as a business hub, with many commuters warming to the Economic Liberals' business-centric policy agenda.

On top of this, having unexpectedly emerged from the 2013 election the second-largest party, the Economic Liberals' leader, former Kuomintang activist Zhao Leji, set about building up a positive public image for himself as a figure who had departed the Kuomintang for being out-of-touch with the needs of Shaanxi and too devoted to the centre ground. As an ardent supporter of anti-corruption measures and a moderate on social issues, he attracted considerable support from ex-Progressives, damaging that party in the province. The other major force dragging the Progressives down was the rise of support for the Communists, who appealed to a large amount of anti-Kuomintang voters in the north who also felt too alienated from Xi'an to want to support the Economic Liberals.

In a manner similar to the Kuomintang in the run up to the prior election, Zhao managed to ally the assembly against the Shangguan administration and bring it down, and entered the election with a sizeable poll lead. In the event, Zhao won 30 of the 69 seats while the Kuomintang tumbled to 22 and, unexpectedly, the Communists took 12 and overtook the Progressives by two points. Only three Progressives won seats in 2016, down from nine in 2013, and it has been suggested the party may be in terminal decline on the provincial level in Shaanxi; ironically, in 2015's presidential election, often seen as a nadir for the Progressives, Cho Jung-tai took over 40% of the vote here, and the Kuomintang's decline here being continued in the 2017 National Congress election means they might not be so doomed on the national front in Shaanxi.
 
It's been a while, but have another American Federation map.

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With a population of almost 44 million people as of 2019, California (or the Union of the Californias as it is legally known) is the most populous member state of the Federation, and alongside New England and Texas one of its most internationally powerful, with the biggest GDP of any Federation member and of course the international influence on popular culture of Hollywood. Today it is generally looked upon as one of the Federation's most left-wing states with its high minimum wage, nationalized universal healthcare system, strong unionization (despite the efforts of companies in Silicon Valley and LA to restrict their influence), the most extensive protections for the rights of LGBTQ individuals of any Federation member (and the second-highest ranking for LGBTQ happiness of any country in the world, behind only Iceland) and community cohesion between not only immigrant and native Californians but Anglophone and Hispanic Californians, with an officially bilingual system. However, these last part have seen a particularly rocky road, and to begin discussing it it is perhaps prudent to look at one of the most aggressive moments of backlash to it, the 1994 presidential election.

Since the 1910s, California's two strongest political parties have been the Republicans, who have existed since the Californias seceded from Mexico and which were initially opposed by two generally weak and predominantly racial parties (the Anglophone Democrats and Hispanic Radicales), and the Progressives, originally formed by turncoat Republican Hiram Johnson when he broke from that party as President and unified the Radicales and liberal Republicans in support of him. Prior to Republican President Pete Wilson winning his first term in 1990, California's had elected Progressive Presidents for every election since 1974, and was coming off two terms of Tom Bradley (their first black President), by which point the state was in financial trouble. Wilson had won his first term by a ten-point margin, with his slogan 'law, order and prosperity' harking back to the glory days of former President Richard Nixon, who had won two non-consecutive terms in 1962 and 1970.

However, Wilson had been divisive during his first term, to say the least. He had feuded with the Progressive-controlled House of Representatives repeatedly, mostly over budget balancing issues, but more prominently (and disturbingly to ethnic minorities in California) over the healthcare and benefits systems in California. He had, on multiple occasions, proposed an executive order that would bar illegal immigrants from receiving free at the point of delivery healthcare or unemployment benefits, and had been in negotiations with Progressive Prime Minister Dianne Feinstein to have this implemented in exchange for no cuts to healthcare programmes. Feinstein had steadfastly refused, and as a result the Californian Parliament had been deadlocked since late 1993.

This played into Wilson's hands excellently. A large majority of Anglophone Californians (67%) approved of his executive order plan, and only 56% of Hispanics opposed it, meaning that to make it a centrepiece of his re-election campaign was a no-brainer that didn't risk alienating many voters who he had a chance of winning over anyway. Better still was the man running to be elected Prime Minister in the concurrent House of Commons election- Francisco Blake Mora, a conservative Baja Californian who supported Wilson's executive order and could sell to many sceptical Hispanics that it was not a racially motivated plan. While the Progressives did put forward a cannily chosen candidate to challenge Wilson, namely John Garamendi, who made the most of his own immigrant background to try and reach out to Anglophones, Wilson was far more popular than the Progressives and his coattails looked to be a sizeable boon to the Republicans.

Wilson won the biggest majority in a Californian presidential race since 1978, taking two of the three Anglophone states (Alta and Medio California, and only narrowly losing Alta California Sur) and, surprisingly, coming very close to taking both Hispanic states due to his sizeable wins in Tijuana and Los Cabos. In Angophone California, only ten municipalities and the City of San Francisco backed Garamendi, and Wilson swept every municipality in Medio California by at least 10 points. In the House of Commons election, Blake Mora unexpectedly became Prime Minister, the Progressives being hurt by losses to minor parties like the Black Panthers and Greens as well as the Republicans. For the first time in 40 years, the Republicans had won a 'duopoly', and commentators wondered whether Wilson's second term would see a conservative realignment in California.

The short answer to that question would turn out to be 'no'. The long answer would turn out to be a decidedly dramatic one.
 
I specifically need the Wikipedia formatted map.
Does electoral geography not work for that?
The wikipedia one is based off the mapchart constituency map, but has a few more zoomed in areas like Belfast and South Wales

I'm not sure what you mean when you say...
Anyone have a higher quality version of the UK constituency map here? On most versions the borders aren't clearly defined so it makes it hard to fill in.
Like, are you downloading the map as a .PNG, which is directly editable in microsoft paint? Because the wikipedia maps are based in the .svg format, which is in some ways better, but you cant edit them in paint unless you convert them into a .png in which case they get a sort of jpeg-like pixelation (which is maybe what you were referring to?). You could also just download inkscape and edit the map in that, and then convert the result to .png which will look better, but inkscape can be a bit more inconvenient than just using mspaint, especially if you have an older computer. Or alternatively you could just use mapchart, which isn't exactly the wiki map but as I said ends up looking pretty close anyway
 
Like, are you downloading the map as a .PNG, which is directly editable in microsoft paint? Because the wikipedia maps are based in the .svg format, which is in some ways better, but you cant edit them in paint unless you convert them into a .png in which case they get a sort of jpeg-like pixelation (which is maybe what you were referring to?). You could also just download inkscape and edit the map in that, and then convert the result to .png which will look better, but inkscape can be a bit more inconvenient than just using mspaint, especially if you have an older computer. Or alternatively you could just use mapchart, which isn't exactly the wiki map but as I said ends up looking pretty close anyway
That's the issue I've been having (I'm very bad at communicating software issues). I would ordinarily just use the mapchart map, but the key areas of interest in the map I want to make are in the north where the extra zoomed in areas would be useful. Is there any way of downloading the .svg into an editable format without having the issue with pixelation that comes with converting it to .jpeg?
 
2018 Korean General Election

United Korea Party (UKP)- Right-Wing, Pro-Japanese
Liberal Democratic Party (LDP)- Center-Right, Pro-Japanese
Progressive Party- Center-Left, Anti-Japanese
People's Party- Center, Anti-Japanese
One Nation Party (ONP)- Far-Right, Anti-Japanese
New Social Party (NSP)- Far-Left , Anti-Japanese

Full Map Korea.png
 
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That's the issue I've been having (I'm very bad at communicating software issues). I would ordinarily just use the mapchart map, but the key areas of interest in the map I want to make are in the north where the extra zoomed in areas would be useful. Is there any way of downloading the .svg into an editable format without having the issue with pixelation that comes with converting it to .jpeg?
On a lot of wikimedia images, there should be an actual page with the image that has links to resize the image in various ways, including the original size. Using this way, you can open a page with the image in full scale .png format and can just copy and paste. But it is one page BACK from the .svg page. Maybe I can find it.

EDIT -
Is THIS the same map? You can blow it up to the original size and even larger in .png format.
This is the largest version they have on wikimedia.
 
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@prime-minister, it would be great if you could make a timeline thread out of this.
Thank you! I'm not sure whether you mean the American Federation or California specifically, but either way I'm tempted to as well. The big difficulties are working out how the different states' policies would conflict with the Federation and each other, and how it slots into 19th, 20th and 21st century history..
 
I have made a couple alternate President lists so have turned them into maps as well.

The red on the list is republican and blue democrat. It is reversed for the map.

“A Second Watergate

POD
: The Iran Contra scandal causes Ronald Reagan to resign but also sabotaging any Republican Presidential candidate attached to him. Reagan resigned on The 4th March 1987.

Ronald Reagan/George H. W. Bush 1981-1987
George H. W. Bush/Vacant 1987
George H. W. Bush/Bob Dole 1987-1989

Michael Dukakis/Lloyd Bentsen 1989-1997

Def 1988: George H.W. Bush/Bob Dole, 1992: Bob Dole/Bill Roth
Bill Clinton/John Kerry 1997-2001
Def 1996: Jack Kemp/Lamar Alexander
John McCain/Mike DeWine 2001-2009
Def 2000: Bill Clinton/John Kerry, 2004: John Kerry/Dick Gephardt
Joe Biden/Jeanne Shaheen 2009-2017
Def 2008: Mike DeWine/Mitt Romney, 2012: Mike Huckabee/Sam Brownback
Jeanne Shaheen/William H. McRaven 2017-Present
Def 2016: Donald Trump/Chris Christie


1988
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1992
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1996
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2000
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2004
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2008
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2012
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2016
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