Alternate Electoral Maps III

Discussion in 'Alternate History Maps and Graphics' started by killertahu22, Jan 28, 2019.

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  1. Tex Arkana Spice for President!

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    Jamaica (I Wish)
    [​IMG]
    I just pasted all the shades (From >40% to >90% for both parties) and put them in Washington State so I could copy them from there.
     
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  2. Bomster Who is the spiciest memelord?

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    1932 if Norman Thomas won all states where he earned more than 2% of the vote:

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    Norman Thomas (S-NY)/James Maurer (S-PA) - 267 EV
    Franklin D. Roosevelt (D-NY)/John N. Garner (D-TX) - 252 EV
    Herbert Hoover (R-CA)/Charles Curtis (R-KS) - 12 EV
     
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  3. Tex Arkana Spice for President!

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    Jamaica (I Wish)
    [​IMG]


    2000 with Gore doing 20 points better in the South and Bush doing 20 points better everywhere else. Bush wins the electoral college easily and probably destroys Gore in the PV. part of Maine was cut off when I uploaded this to imgur, for some reason.
     
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  4. Gentleman Biaggi Leader of the bisexual agenda

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    Does Gore still win Massachusetts and Rhode Island?
     
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  5. Tex Arkana Spice for President!

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    Yes, and Bush still wins Oklahoma and Texas, but otherwise this is a straightforward North/South split in terms of state results.
     
  6. Gentleman Biaggi Leader of the bisexual agenda

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    I checked, Gore also wins NY
    so it’s basically Uber-Al Smith
     
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  7. Calthrina950 Well-Known Member

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    What would the electoral map look like here? I assume that Gore would win every Southern state except for Texas, Oklahoma, and maybe Georgia.
     
  8. Tex Arkana Spice for President!

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    Gore wins every Southern State except for Texas and Oklahoma, and Bush wins every non-Southern state except for MA, NY, and Rhode Island.
     
  9. Calthrina950 Well-Known Member

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    I see. Did you create a percentage map by state as well?
     
  10. Tex Arkana Spice for President!

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    Jan 29, 2017
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    Jamaica (I Wish)
    [​IMG]
     
  11. Gentleman Biaggi Leader of the bisexual agenda

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    Oregonian Montana
    beautiful
     
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  12. Planita13 Wishing for a Lake

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    the shores of the Gran Lago
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  13. Wolfram Fair to middlin'

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    University of Houston, Houston, Texas
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2019
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  14. DrWalpurgis ha ha ha OH WELL

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    I like it, but I feel that the Navajo reservation seceding is more likely than the Sioux.
     
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  15. Wolfram Fair to middlin'

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    Probably, but I don’t think it’s impossible that the Sioux could get it done first and then have the Navajo be stymied by the Petition Reform Act. (Also, unlike the Sioux, there are no Arizona counties completely within the Navajo Nation.)
     
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  16. MorganKingsley Well-Known Member

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    Apr 21, 2018
    1928 election alternate history explained

    After the 1924 election, as Calvin Coolidge had started to show off his conservative side, both sides were wondering how best to go on with the next election. To continue the conservative legacy of Coolidge, or to jump to a more progressive side as a whole. The democrats were sort of hoping to be able to find a sort of compromise, to be able to unite two different sides of the country. Not only that, but there was a giant problem with the fact that there were no endorsements for either party, meaning that who either nominate are sort of more open to being given towards the time of the convention.

    Despite the hard contest for nominations, eventually the democrat party settled on New York Governor Alfred Smith for their candidate, despite his problems with the south. He was a Catholic, he was anti prohibition, he was tied to Tammany Hall, and most of all, he was a far left liberal. As a result of this, there was no doubt that he had to nominate a alt-right southerner to give him those southern electoral votes, no matter what. And with that, he was left to pick between somebody in those 11 states to try and appease the south. Despite not being super obvious, he decided he would go for Texas, since that was the electoral power house of the south, and picking a Texas running mate would give him those 23 electoral votes at least.

    Eventually, despite his complete political difference with the man, he started to look at Garner as his running mate. They debated it for a good week or two, and came to a compromise. He would serve as Smith's running mate under two conditions: He gets to campaign in the south, where Smith does not even touch that region. And second, Smith has to pick some southerners in his cabinet on the event that he wins the election. Smith, aware of his situation, agrees to these, and the announcement of his running mate is made a few days later.

    The republican nomination was less chaotic, by comparison. Coolidge had no interest in running again, so the window was open. Eventually, the party settled for Herbert Hoover, despite some opposition. In the end, he choose Charles Curtis as his running mate.

    Throughout much of the campaign, Smith was fiercely attacking Curtis for his age, as he would have been the oldest vice president ever if he was elected, as well as attacking Hoover for his lack of inexperience. He also completely removed himself from Tammany Hall, which virtually sealed New York's 49 electoral votes to the Smith column. He also respected his running mate's wishes, not even touching the south once in his entire campaign, and let the popular (at the time) representative do his own job. He also mounted a nationwide, barring the south, campaign where he would visit each state extensively. Then he was working to bring in a coalition between the liberal end of the party, and the conservative end, with him saying that regardless of his position on prohibition, he was willing to let the states decide if they wanted it after all, along with other issues he lightened up to both sides on. Regardless of if he would win or not, even the most die hard republicans would concede that Smith gave a great fight against impossible odds. But as he would later learn, it just was not enough to do Hoover in.

    Despite his relative inexperience, Hoover just kept a low level campaign, neither responding positively or angrily to Smith's claims, and instead campaigned himself as a seconc term of Coolidge. Campaigning himself to keep things together, and not be making things worse for the country, which he said Smith would be doing, also claiming that it is best to stay with the party that brought the country peace and prosperity than to switch for no real good reason. In the end, the republicans were able to keep it together for one more term.

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    Herbert Hoover - 341 electoral votes (59.1 percent) / 53.2 percent popular vote
    Alfred Smith - 237 electoral votes (40.9 percent) / 45.8 percent popular vote

    Despite the problems that Smith had to face from the first day of his campaign, Smith was able to make the election relatively close in the end by locking in the south, New York, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Utah, and Wisconsin, many of which were by only one or two percent, and even a couple by less than one percent. Despite this, they were enough to put those electoral votes to his column, and turn what should have been a landslide Hoover win to just a modest one. In the end, despite losing, Smith would eventually come out as the one with the better career in the end and the better reputation and Smith said openly in 1935 "If I knew what was to come, I would not even have tried." Referring to the depression. His campaign did have some success though, as it would directly lead to the start of the New Deal just 4 years later, so his campaign was considered a needed sacrifice for the democrat party

    *I know Smith lost Florida by more than 10, but I just decided in this idea, with him not even dealing with the south, and letting his running mate do it instead, it ended up giving him a skin of his teeth victory there.
     
  17. MorganKingsley Well-Known Member

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    Finally, we can move on to 1932
     
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  18. Calthrina950 Well-Known Member

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    I was wondering if you wouldn't mind taking a request. Could you do a map of Colorado if Stapleton had gotten 75% of the vote against Polis last year? I was just curious to see how it would look.
     
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  19. MorganKingsley Well-Known Member

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    Apr 21, 2018
    1932 election alternate history

    Around half way through Hoover's first year, the country realized how much of a mistake it was to not vote in Smith after all. With the great depression starting in 1929, there was virtually no place of good moral in the country over the next four years, and the country was mostly just wanting to kick Hoover out, regardless of if it was for a random democrat or for a different republican. That plus twelve years of republican rule made this a perfect recipe for the democrats to come along and steal the day from Hoover in 1932.

    Around 1932, when the election was coming to a head, Hoover himself knew he had no hope in winning. However, he felt like maybe he would be able to at least make the margin closer than the polls gave him to be, where some were showing him only winning three or four states. To do this, he did a nationwide campaign, even stopping by the south for a quick 5 day tour visiting two of those states a day, just to get his message of a new economic plan across that he hoped would help the next administration, as well as speaking to the voters. He felt like doing something like this would be able to make him at least appealing as a human being to the voters, which was his main goal by this tour. It didn't work out as well as he had hoped, since it did not give him anywhere close to winning, but it elevated him a bit in the popular vote, and therefore gave him some states that would have gone to the democrat under a bigger wave year.

    After a chaotic in comparison to 1928, but tame compared to 1924, democratic convention, Franklin Roosevelt became the top nominee. Smith tried to make the nomination, and actually had more delegates than Roosevelt on the first ballot, but after failing to get the nomination, and Roosevelt starting to make alliances with McAdoo and Garner, and even Harry Byrd throwing the minimal delegates he had to Roosevelt, Smith had no chance, and eventually gave up by the third ballot, letting Roosevelt get the nomination. However, the vice presidential candidate was where things were going to be placed in debate, as there was some feelings that nominating Garner would be best, but after 1928, many felt it would be a bit repetitive nominating the same conservative, and a liberal who was Smith's successor, but many also remembered how rejecting that ticket worked in 1928, and many felt that americans had over all learned their lesson, and that they could get away with doing it again. Garner agreed to do it once again, but under the extremely strict condition that once his term as vice president was over, he would be nominated as speaker again on the event that the democrats won another mid terms in the next four or eight years, which ever one happens first

    Despite his personal problems with Smith, Roosevelt knew that the former governor was indeed onto something in 1928 when he was talking about a working coalition that can bring the entire country together, something that almost happened. Roosevelt convinced Smith to reluctantly talk with him, where Smith laid down what his plans in 1928 were, and Roosevelt explained the plans that he had made. After the talk, Roosevelt, with Smith's permission, decided to take the parts of both his plan and Smith's former plan to create the New Deal, a coalition to which he was planning to attempt to unite all parts of the democrat party, ending that disenfranchisement, while also bringing in new reluctant republicans from Hoover to either him or just staying home. He has also hoped to bring in non voters to a one time vote for him. But he knew it was going to be a tall order, so he decided to work in order, starting with the party unification.

    The overall campaigns of both candidates were mostly uneventful. Roosevelt kept talking about his plans and New Deal, but due to not wanting to give away his plans too much in fear of Hoover stealing them, kept hinting at small details of it, speaking about what he wanted, and that in order to know the full extent of his plans, the best bet would be to vote for him that election.

    In the end, even with some people disaffected by the repeated ticket basically from 1928, confused on what Roosevelt was really planning, and some concerns on if he was telling the truth or not, it simply was not enough. Many people admit that it was a better night for Hoover than expected, and a far cry from the complete beat down expected, but still, it was nowhere near enough for a win...

    [​IMG]

    Franklin Roosevelt - 473 electoral votes (72.5 percent) / 52.51 percent popular vote
    Herbert Hoover - 173 electoral votes (27.5 percent) / 44.45 percent popular vote

    In the end, while Roosevelt did win, and still in a relative landslide, it was nowhere near the beating that most people in the nation were expecting. In fact, in the popular vote, it was not really all that much of a landslide, but due to Roosevelt's wide spread appeal, in the electoral college it was a sweep in virtually every region besides New England, where Roosevelt only won Rhode Island. Despite this, it was able to set his way into an administration where he had as much power as he needed to fulfill his agenda.

    Despite the fact that it was not quite as commanding of a victory as he wishes, Roosevelt still got what he wanted in many other ways. This was to date the highest amount of electoral votes earned by a candidate. He was only the second democrat in history to carry Minnesota. The first to carry several states since 1916, and the first since 1916 to get a absolute majority of the popular vote, and his performances was one of the highest ever earned by a democrat, both electorally and in the popular vote. So while it was not as commanding as people expected, it was still a definite margin going into the future.

    Not many people would be fully aware of all of the changes that would be made to the country over the course of the next four years, and the impact on the country as a whole in the decades to come has often been widely debated on if the impact was for good or bad. But one thing was for sure: 1932 was the start to a completely different America

    * In this timeline, Wilson wins Indiana, West Virginia, and Minnesota, all states he lost by less than one. Ultimately he earns 311 (58 percent) electoral votes and Hughes wins 220 (42 percent). In the popular vote, Wilson goes up by one full percent and Hughes goes down by one. Making it a close election, but not a nail biter.
     
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  20. Amadeus Well-Known Member

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    Mar 19, 2017
    RFK Doesn't Run in 1968:

    The POD is Eugene McCarthy accepts Kennedy's offer of an endorsement in exchange for his support for RFK's anti-poverty programs. With Kennedy's support giving him an added boost, McCarthy narrowly defeats LBJ in the New Hampshire primary. Johnson withdraws days later, and in the following months McCarthy sweeps the primaries. However, he is denied the nomination by Democratic Party bosses who choose Humphrey at the convention. Although a surviving RFK and his followers are demoralized by McCarthy's defeat, Kennedy makes a stand-out convention speech calling for Democratic unity and an end to the violence and chaos outside in Chicago. Kennedy's speech is widely praised and he campaigns with gusto for Humphrey in the general. Although HHH narrowly wins the popular vote by a fraction of a percent, Nixon manages to just barely defeat him in the electoral college:

    He Did Not Run.png

    Following Humphrey's defeat, RFK is the most popular Democrat in the country and he's the frontrunner for 1972. Behind closed doors Nixon is outraged that he lost the popular vote and blames the Kennedys for yet again "cheating him" of his destiny. As Nixon expands the Vietnam War and the economy enters recession, the first opinion polls show RFK defeating the President in 1972. Nixon begins a campaign of illegal sabotage against Kennedy and the Democrats, culminating in a mysterious break-in at the Democratic headquarters at the Watergate Hotel. As the economy begins to recover and Nixon makes his landmark visit to China he catches up to Kennedy in the polls. Upon his return to the United States Nixon vigorously stumps around the country, even cancelling important foreign trips in order to do so. One such trip was a planned meeting with Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau. Arthur Bremer, a deranged young man who planned to kill Nixon in Canada, instead follows Nixon to a campaign stop in Wisconsin where he attempts to assassinate the President. Bremer is thwarted by the secret service, and the failed attempt provides another boost to Nixon. Although the charismatic Kennedy makes a strong case against Nixon on foreign policy, the economy, and the aura of scandal surrounding Watergate, the President is re-elected with 321 electoral votes to Kennedy's 193. George Wallace, who returned to run yet another third party candidacy, garnered 24 votes:

    RFK vs Nixon and Wallace.png

    Please like if you're interested in seeing the results for 1976.
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2019
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