Alternate Electoral Maps III

Discussion in 'Alternate History Maps and Graphics' started by killertahu22, Jan 28, 2019.

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  1. RJGFox Well-Known Member

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    With southern party bosses making it clear that they would not allow President Willkie to be renominated in 1948, it wasn’t particularly surprising when he announced, in January 1948, that he wouldn’t be seeking the Democratic nomination for President.

    It was, however, more of a surprise when in mid-March he announced that he would be campaigning for President as an independent, under the banner of ‘The President’s Party’. Groups sprung up across the country, and the selection of a southern conservative by the Democrats and a midwestern conservative by the Republicans resulted in a comparatively open field for a liberal candidate. As the fall campaign intensified, it became clear that Willkie had a path to victory, however unlikely.

    Dissatisfied liberal Republicans in the north, and Democrats outside the south helped build a nationwide coalition just about strong enough to keep Willkie in 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.

    President Wendell Willkie (IN)/Assemblyman Irving Ives (NY)
    The President's Party
    278 Electoral Votes
    15,838,395 votes (32%)

    Vice President James F. Byrnes (SC)/Postmaster General James Farley (NY)
    Democratic Party
    206 Electoral Votes
    17,004,910 votes (34%)

    Governor John Bricker (OH)/Representative B. Carroll Reece (TN)
    Republican Party
    47 Electoral Votes
    14,401,682 (29%)

    1948 mk2.png
     
  2. RJGFox Well-Known Member

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    Another version of this. Colours inverted, obviously, but shows the narrow path "...across the wilderness, from sea to shining sea...", that the 33rd President of the United States walked to re-election.

    1948 analysis.png
     
  3. Tomislav Addai Well-Known Member

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    upload_2019-5-5_16-19-49.png
    South African elections, to the European House:
    1. Nasionale Party (dark orange), won 53 /100 constituencies, managing to gain majority in rural Transvaal, eastern Vrystaat, and rural Cape, as well as Afrikaans speaking sections of Cape Town
    2. Demokratiese Party (blue) won 30/100, becoming the greatest opposition party. Its electorate is predominantly anglophone urbans, with strength in Cape Twon, Natal and central Transvaal
    3. Vryheidsfront (golden) won 15/100 constituencies, in parts of eastern Transvaal, in the Karoo and western Vrystaat
    4. Afrika Christen Demokratiese Party (purple) won a lone constituency in western Natal
    5. Afrikaner Weerstandsbeweging (red) won a sole constituency in the western Transvaal.
    Notice:
    Two additional constitutuencies were added: one for SouthWest Africa, other for the diaspora (voting takes place at embassies and consulates)
     
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  4. prime-minister Commander of High Authoritah

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    upload_2019-5-6_3-13-57.png

    Since the influential Local Government Act of 1973, England, one of the four constituent countries of the United Kingdom, has been divided into nine constituent regions, the majority of which are named for ancient kingdoms or counties of England. The reforms were fairly controversial at the time, but have brought England in line with the traditions of other countries' regional divisions, and are used to allocate seats to both the House of Commons and the European Parliament. In addition, they have all had elected assemblies since 1974, although unlike many countries with devolved power, they were functionally similar to county councils until the English Assemblies Act of 1998 devolved more power to their leaders (known as Mayors).

    • Northumbria is the northernmost region, comprising the ceremonial counties of Cumbria, Northumberland, Tyne and Wear and County Durham. With a population of around 2.8 million, it is the least populous English region, and more than a third of this is concentrated in Tyne and Wear. Given the historic industrial nature of its main population centres, it is one of two English regions to always have had elected Labour Party governments, although the 2007 election famously saw the government lose its majority for the first time ever, and it did so again in 2019. Elections there have been held every 4 years since 1975.
    • Lancashire is the only region to comprise only one historic county, although it consists of the current ceremonial county of Lancashire and the metropolitan counties of Greater Manchester and Merseyside. Despite being the second-smallest in area (second only to Greater London) it also has a population of 5.63 million and the second-highest population density of any English region. Ironically, its capital, Lancaster, is the smallest regional capital, and the cities of Liverpool and Manchester are both substantially bigger, but the decision was made to make Lancaster the capital both out of historical precedent and to avoid flaring up the rivalry between the two big industrial cities. Since the 2013 election, the mayor has been Tony Lloyd, and it is the other region Labour has always controlled. Its elections have been held at 3-year intervals since 1974.
    • Yorkshire comprises the four subdivisions of Yorkshire, and is the only region to have had its boundaries significantly altered with the 1996 county boundary changes (Avon was always split between Dumnonia and Wessex), as the portion south of the Humber was moved into the West Midlands. 5.44 million people live in the county under its current boundaries, and its regional elections have usually seen Labour perform better; they won a plurality of seats there in 2019, and appear to be likely to govern with support from the Liberal Democrats. The elections there have been held at five-year intervals since 1974.
    • The West Midlands has a population of 5.7 million, and incorporates Cheshire, Shropshire, Herefordshire, Worcestershire, Warwickshire, Staffordshire and the West Midlands metropolitan county. It was originally planned to be called West Mercia and to have Tamworth as its capital, but petitioning from residents saw the capital moved to Birmingham to reflect the influence of the metropolitan county of the West Midlands, where more than half its inhabitants live. It has traditionally been a battleground between Labour and the Tories, and since 2006 has had a Conservative administration. Since 1975, elections in the West Midlands have been held every 3 years.
    • The East Midlands, which includes the ceremonial counties of Derbyshire, Leicestershire, Lincolnshire, Northamptonshire, Nottinghamshire and Rutland, has changed control more than any other local authority, as a government has not been re-elected in the same form since Labour won re-election with a majority in 1999. While the Tories have controlled the region since 2007, they have lost and regained their majority multiple times, losing it in 2011, regaining it in 2015, and losing it again in 2019 due to an upswing in support for Independents and the Liberal Democrats. Despite this, it seems likely they will simply continue in a minority, since a three-way Labour-Lib Dem-Independent coalition seems unlikely. The region's first election was held in 1975, and they have taken place every 4 years since.
    • East Anglia is perhaps the most inaccurately named region, as the kingdom which it is named for originally only comprised modern-day Norfolk, Suffolk and part of Cambridgeshire. The modern equivalent incorporates seven ceremonial counties- the aforementioned three, plus Bedfordshire, Essex, Hertfordshire and Kent. It is the third most-populous region in the UK, with around 7.7 million residents, and the region has only briefly been controlled by a party other than the Conservatives, when a Labour-Liberal Democrat coalition took control of the council from 1995 to 1999. However, the 2019 elections unexpectedly saw the Tories lose their majority here for the first time since that election, and Labour, the Lib Dems and the numerous Independents are in talks about forming a rainbow coalition against them. East Anglia has held elections every 4 years since 1975.
    • Greater London is the only authority to have been extant before the Local Government Act of 1973, and is both the only one with a partly proportional system and the only one in which the Mayor and leader of the regional assembly are separate positions, though they are elected concurrently. Labour have had the majority of seats in London elections in every election since 1993, and aside from their brief spell in power from 1989-93 the Tories have not had the most seats in the capital region since 1981. The incumbent mayor, Labour's Sadiq Khan, was elected in 2017 as part of the regularly scheduled 4-year term of every election since 1977. With 8.8 million inhabitants, the capital region is the most populous in England.
    • Wessex comprises nine counties, more than any other English region (namely Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, East Sussex, Gloucestershire, Hampshire, Oxfordshire, Surrey, West Sussex and Wiltshire), and has the second-highest population of all the regions at 8.619 million. Like Lancashire, its regional capital (Winchester) was chosen more due to historical connotations than particular political significance, and like East Anglia, it has never seen any party besides the Conservatives form a majority government. However, the 2019 election did see the Tories lose their majority there for the first time in the region's history. Wessex has held elections on 5-year terms since 1974.
    • The West Country is home to 3.67 million people, making it the second-least populous region, and consists of the counties of Cornwall, Devon, Dorset and Somerset and the city-county of Bristol. It is notable for being the only region where the Liberal Democrats have ever won the most seats, governing it between 1994 and 2014, when the Tories won a majority having previously kept the Lib Dems to a minority since 2006, and is generally Labour's weakest area, with some strength in Plymouth and the capital Bristol but little elsewhere.
     
  5. Bomster Who is the spiciest memelord?

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    2012
    [​IMG]
    Barack Obama (D-IL)/Joe Biden (D-DE) - 396 EV, 57% PV

    Newt Gingrich (R-GA)/Rick Santorum (R-PA) - 142 EV, 41% PV
     
  6. Tex Arkana Goodbye Sadness

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    Obama would have won more states than that if he won the PV by 16%.
     
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  7. Omar04 Well-Known Member

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    Maybe Montana?
     
  8. Tex Arkana Goodbye Sadness

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    I'd say Montana, Mississippi, South Carolina, and Texas. it wouldn't be a uniform swing from the OTL 2012 results.
     
  9. Tomislav Addai Well-Known Member

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    khoisanconst.png
    the 75 coloured constituencies of South Africa. The Cape has 63 of that ammount, and Cape Town 26. Apparently, who fails to make considerable gains in the Western Cape (42 seats) loses the election
     
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  10. Bomster Who is the spiciest memelord?

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    What do you think it would look like then, as in PV margin?
     
  11. wolfhound817 Priest of Hank

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    A217EC35-1FB4-4C45-9855-4A1F30067FDF.jpeg
    1976 after Agnew Impeached

    Blue-Nelson Rockefeller (R-NY)/Richard Schweiker (R-PA)

    Red-Jimmy Carter (D-GA)/Hubert Humphrey (D-MN)

    Yellow- George Wallace (D-AL)/Mo Udall (D-AZ)

    Green- Edward Kennedy (D-MA)/Hugh Carey (D-NY)
     
  12. Tex Arkana Goodbye Sadness

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    [​IMG]

    I think Obama wouldn't have improved too much in the already solidly Democratic states but would have done much better in the lean or likely GOP states.
     
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  13. JoeyB2198 Well-Known Member

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    Nov 14, 2012
    A Thousand Points of Light: Indiana 2016 Gubernatorial Election

    [​IMG]

    Indiana is demographically a quintessential example of the Midwest, characterized by mixed German-Irish settlement in the countryside, with more ethnically mixed post-industrial cities slowly losing population from emigration. Politically, however, it has long been distinct from its neighbors in that it has a higher concentration of Irish settlement proportional to German, and so its PD party is much more dominant and so much more established than its neighbors. In 2016, Indiana's popular governor was easily reelected despite the fracturing of the Celtic coalition in other parts of the country.

    2018 Midterms (semi-canon)
    North Carolina
    Kanawha
    Dakota
    2012 Presidential
     
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  14. aaa Well-Known Member

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    Hans Bayha = Evan Bayh?
     
  15. True Grit Creek

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    No way this would happen. As a national Democratic ticket maybe, but not a third-party bid.
     
  16. JoeyB2198 Well-Known Member

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    Yep
     
  17. wolfhound817 Priest of Hank

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    They claim to be the true Democratic ticket even though Carter was to official nominee.
     
  18. Tex Arkana Goodbye Sadness

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    [​IMG]

    I tried the whole "liberal Republican, conservative Democrat" thing in 1988 and this is what I came up with. Pennsylvania Senator Arlen Specter vs. Texas Senator Lloyd Bentsen. who do you think wins, and what does the PV look like? I intentionally made the election quite close so it'd be harder for you guys to guess.
     
  19. Bomster Who is the spiciest memelord?

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    Hell, Arizona
    [​IMG]
    Is this correct?
     
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  20. Tex Arkana Goodbye Sadness

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    You got some states wrong, but most are right.
     
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