Alternate Electoral Maps II

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Laboratories of Democracy, Part XII: Rhode Island
A Status Quo We Can Believe In

Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, the smallest state in the Union by land area, is a slightly unusual place. While its Revolutionary heritage is less famed than that of neighboring Massachusetts, Rhode Island nonetheless has a proud and strong tradition of free thought and independent action, which has sometimes been a source of pride and sometimes one of shame - for instance, the state was the epicenter of the slave trade in the northern states, had a widespread panic about vampirism following an 1850s tuberculosis outbreak, and it took an armed rebellion before all adult men earned the right to vote, but on the other hand the state is home to Brown University, traditionally the most politically radical of the Ivy League universities, and it was the first state to send its men to fight in the Civil War, with over a tenth of its population participating in that conflict at one point or another.

In the 20th century, the state's politics have largely been a sort of mirror image of the rest of New England, with Labor completely dominant and the Republicans languishing in opposition. The GOP occasionally is able to win a statewide elected office, but it almost always does dismally on the legislative level, and has not held a majority in the unicameral General Assembly in over half a century. Republican or independent governors have traditionally had to work with a Labor legislature, which those on the left argue has created a tradition of constructive consensus-driven politics in the state (in contrast with the confrontational style of politics in states like New York or Ohio), while the right believes it's made any attempt at altering the course of events impossible and cemented Rhode Island's institutional bloat. The main third party in the state is the eccentrically-named Cool Moose Party, led by the equally eccentric perennial gubernatorial candidate Bob Healey, who's run for governor in every election since 1998 on a platform of ending partisanship and uniting the best people from across the political spectrum to reform the government along "common sense" lines - usually this makes him more friends among the GOP than with Labor.

As mentioned, the General Assembly of Rhode Island is a unicameral body - the Labor Party abolished the upper house as soon as it was able to, not wanting to see a repeat of the Massachusetts situation - with 75 members, who are elected by PR in seven districts of roughly equal size. Kent and Washington counties are each equivalent to one district (along with judicial purposes the only form in which those counties survive, Rhode Island being one of three states in the union with only a single tier of local government), while Newport and Bristol counties form a district together and Providence County is split into four districts of equal size, one being the city of Providence itself and the others divisions along geographic lines.

usch-modern-ri-png.299360


Texas
Washington
Massachussetts
New Hampshire
Georgia
Louisiana
Minnesota
South Carolina
Nebraska
Virginia
Utah



What happened to this, this is what brought me to here as a lurker and I have always wondered why it so abruptly ended?

I really hope this could be restarted and completed, as I found it so very interesting.
 
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Please quote other people's posts rather than just reposting them, as newcomers and low-information readers might think it's your work.

As to your question, I've said from the beginning that I go at my own pace with this, and only do a state when I've got an idea. At present, I don't really, although that could change at any time. So it's hard for me to say.
 

Thande

Donor
The creation of a system of joined-up devolved government across the UK has been lauded as one of the most all-pervading reforms of the Conservative-Lib Dem coalition, although it has been the subject of much criticism. The core fault of the system, in the eyes of many, is that in an attempt to gain the support of the sort of right-wingers who hate the Biased Left-wing BBC, they ultimately decided to devolve power to Assemblies, elected by STV, based on the ITV television regions.

This meant, for instance, that most of Nottinghamshire was put into the Yorkshire Assembly, while Nottingham itself was pulled into the ambit of Birmingham as part of the Central Assembly. Dorset was split in three by the West Country, West and Meridian Assemblies. London sprawled out towards Crawley, Luton, Bracknell and Rochford, to the great delight of certain British Republicans.

Perhaps the most divisive of the new regions was that of the Borders, which took most of the South Scotland region from the old Scottish Parliament, and added almost all of Cumbria, apart from Barrow-in-Furness which became an exclave of the Granada Assembly. Scottish nationalists protested at this outrageous attempt at gerrymandering, and won nine of the 40 seats in the first regional elections of 2013. This was one of the factors which allowed the Labour Party to lead a Labour-SNP-Lib Dem coalition in the Borders for the first term of the region, but this Government has been plagued with internal divisions over the Scottish Question and, to a lesser extent, the Barrow Question. Jim Harmezian has even started a new political party fighting for Cumbrian unity and has won a seat in the Granada Assembly with this aim.

So when the regional elections came round again in 2017, this time combined with the snap general election called by Theresa May, the general national wing to Labour was not reflected in the Borders. Labour failed to top the poll in Copeland, which had been lost to the Tories on the Westminster level in a by-election some months previously. The Liberal Democrats also lost seats and only barely topped the poll in Tim Farron's seat. Meanwhile, the Tories (formerly the sole opposition on the Assembly) knocked the SNP back on their heels in the Scottish constituencies, mostly benefiting from Unionist transfers three years after the Scottish independence referendum. All of this has resulted in John Lamont's Conservatives winning a majority, 21 seats out of 40, with Lamont being invested as Mayor of the Borders shortly after the election.

Four years after the creation of such a controversial scheme of devolution, the party that instituted it has won a majority in the most controversial of the regions. Perhaps people do just get used to the systems imposed on them by Governments.

I love how realistically awful that is. Don't see that much.

It's like how people won't come up with US state flags or African/US Plains borders that look as realistically awful as OTL's.
 
I love how realistically awful that is. Don't see that much.

It's like how people won't come up with US state flags or African/US Plains borders that look as realistically awful as OTL's.

I would assume it's the same special kind of Providence that protects space programmes, zeppelins and the British Liberal Party.
 

fashbasher

Banned
Laboratories of Democracy, Part XII: Rhode Island
A Status Quo We Can Believe In

Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, the smallest state in the Union by land area, is a slightly unusual place. While its Revolutionary heritage is less famed than that of neighboring Massachusetts, Rhode Island nonetheless has a proud and strong tradition of free thought and independent action, which has sometimes been a source of pride and sometimes one of shame - for instance, the state was the epicenter of the slave trade in the northern states, had a widespread panic about vampirism following an 1850s tuberculosis outbreak, and it took an armed rebellion before all adult men earned the right to vote, but on the other hand the state is home to Brown University, traditionally the most politically radical of the Ivy League universities, and it was the first state to send its men to fight in the Civil War, with over a tenth of its population participating in that conflict at one point or another.

In the 20th century, the state's politics have largely been a sort of mirror image of the rest of New England, with Labor completely dominant and the Republicans languishing in opposition. The GOP occasionally is able to win a statewide elected office, but it almost always does dismally on the legislative level, and has not held a majority in the unicameral General Assembly in over half a century. Republican or independent governors have traditionally had to work with a Labor legislature, which those on the left argue has created a tradition of constructive consensus-driven politics in the state (in contrast with the confrontational style of politics in states like New York or Ohio), while the right believes it's made any attempt at altering the course of events impossible and cemented Rhode Island's institutional bloat. The main third party in the state is the eccentrically-named Cool Moose Party, led by the equally eccentric perennial gubernatorial candidate Bob Healey, who's run for governor in every election since 1998 on a platform of ending partisanship and uniting the best people from across the political spectrum to reform the government along "common sense" lines - usually this makes him more friends among the GOP than with Labor.

As mentioned, the General Assembly of Rhode Island is a unicameral body - the Labor Party abolished the upper house as soon as it was able to, not wanting to see a repeat of the Massachusetts situation - with 75 members, who are elected by PR in seven districts of roughly equal size. Kent and Washington counties are each equivalent to one district (along with judicial purposes the only form in which those counties survive, Rhode Island being one of three states in the union with only a single tier of local government), while Newport and Bristol counties form a district together and Providence County is split into four districts of equal size, one being the city of Providence itself and the others divisions along geographic lines.

usch-modern-ri-png.299360


Texas
Washington
Massachussetts
New Hampshire
Georgia
Louisiana
Minnesota
South Carolina
Nebraska
Virginia
Utah



What happened to this, this is what brought me to here as a lurker and I have always wondered why it so abruptly ended?

I really hope this could be restarted and completed, as I found it so very interesting.

Dat Pawtucket wank...and that Mega Woonsocket! Love it...
 
Please quote other people's posts rather than just reposting them, as newcomers and low-information readers might think it's your work.

As to your question, I've said from the beginning that I go at my own pace with this, and only do a state when I've got an idea. At present, I don't really, although that could change at any time. So it's hard for me to say.
I am unable to quote it as it was posted in a thread which has now been locked, however I have now quoted by inserting the quote marks.
 
Please quote other people's posts rather than just reposting them, as newcomers and low-information readers might think it's your work.

As to your question, I've said from the beginning that I go at my own pace with this, and only do a state when I've got an idea. At present, I don't really, although that could change at any time. So it's hard for me to say.
Firstly, apologies for not putting it in a quote.
Secondly, I really do hope that you soon get an idea for another state in this series, as I really do love the maps you made for this series.
 
If the national polls got 2012 right.
2012 US election
President Barack Obama/Joe Biden-Democratic: 285 EV 49.44%
Mitt Romney/Paul Ryan-Republican: 253 EV 48.72%
genusmap.php
 
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