Oh I didn't say it was at all likely. But if you want a German jet in Irish service that's about the only way I can see it.
A WW2 one, most likely yes, other German jets, well given the long list of attempts to sell to the AC who knows, Baldonnel has had plenty of sales visits over the decade but the usual suspects always end it at demos.
 
TL-191 Ireland is a Ally/Client state of the Union which was flying Me- 262's at the end of the books.
I haven't read it but the colours are wrong imo, that scheme was from 1954 onwards, in the time period that the 262 would be operational it would have been the two colour Green and Orange.
 
Just learned that the British Army nearly received fighter command from the RAF at the same time as the RN got the FAA back, the RN also nearly getting coastal command. The video mentions that they don't know how serious a bid it was. But that would have been interesting.
 
In April 1940 a single I.A.R 80 is delivered to Athens for evaluation by the Royal Hellenic Air Force. This is Greece's preferred option for replacing their PZL 24's but only 10 had been delivered before Greece fell a year later.

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Btw how do you make stuff like this? Is there a site?
I didn't make it, I found it here.

 
In April 1940 a single I.A.R 80 is delivered to Athens for evaluation by the Royal Hellenic Air Force. This is Greece's preferred option for replacing their PZL 24's but only 10 had been delivered before Greece fell a year later.
The I.A.R 80 and 81 are such cool underapreciated aircraft. I find it fascinating that they are the (only I know of at least) more or less competetive fighter developed by a minor power during that time.
Do you think they would have been a good fit for greece in general?
 
The I.A.R 80 and 81 are such cool underapreciated aircraft. I find it fascinating that they are the (only I know of at least) more or less competetive fighter developed by a minor power during that time.
Do you think they would have been a good fit for greece in general?

The problem is that the Romanian had serious problems to build them for the first 2 years, so I suspect they will have serious logistics problems. I suppose that's why Peg Leg Pom said they only received 10 at the start of the Italian invasion.
 
The I.A.R 80 and 81 are such cool underapreciated aircraft. I find it fascinating that they are the (only I know of at least) more or less competetive fighter developed by a minor power during that time.
Do you think they would have been a good fit for greece in general?
Didn’t the IARs have some PZL DNA, or is that my imagination?
 
Didn’t the IARs have some PZL DNA, or is that my imagination?
The tail unit is a copy of the tail of PZL P.24 and some of the other elements such as the fuselage shape are also based on that plane, which was build at that time under license by IAR as far as I know.
 
The tail unit is a copy of the tail of PZL P.24 and some of the other elements such as the fuselage shape are also based on that plane, which was build at that time under license by IAR as far as I know.
What I've never understood is why the Poles didn't do it first and potentially have at least some modern fighters in September 1939.
 

Driftless

Donor
The tail unit is a copy of the tail of PZL P.24 and some of the other elements such as the fuselage shape are also based on that plane, which was build at that time under license by IAR as far as I know.

What I've never understood is why the Poles didn't do it first and potentially have at least some modern fighters in September 1939.
I think the closest they got was the PZL.50 Jastrzab (first flight early 1939) And that was still behind the technology curve
 
I think the closest they got was the PZL.50 Jastrzab (first flight early 1939) And that was still behind the technology curve
The Poles have no excuse for that contraption. Throughout the early and mid 1930's they were building some of the most advanced combat aircraft in the world and then when it came to a low wing monoplane fighter they completely screwed it up. It's not that they didn't have the expertise they just screwed it up, waited too long and didn't even bother looking for a stopgap, despite the fact they were building the ideal stopgap for other countries.
 
The Poles have no excuse for that contraption. Throughout the early and mid 1930's they were building some of the most advanced combat aircraft in the world and then when it came to a low wing monoplane fighter they completely screwed it up. It's not that they didn't have the expertise they just screwed it up, waited too long and didn't even bother looking for a stopgap, despite the fact they were building the ideal stopgap for other countries.
They didn't even build the P24 for themselves and build yet another obsolete P11G stopgap...
 
Oh well, not that it would have made a difference even if the Polish Air Force had been fully equipped with the best fighter in the world, they were mostly caught on the ground,
 
Oh well, not that it would have made a difference even if the Polish Air Force had been fully equipped with the best fighter in the world, they were mostly caught on the ground,
Very few where caught on the ground, its just another myth like Lancers charging panzers
 
In 1960 the UK intelligence services begin to suspect that the People's Republic of China has more influence with the unions involved in the British Aviation industry than they thought.

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