Albion, where the Sun never set

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I highly recommend it for everyone to watch!
 
1) How was the Mountbatten name created TTL (as Albion and Germany fought on the same side during WW1)?
2) Have there been any proposed Imperial Kingdoms that didn't happen?
3) Why isn't Carniola featured on the map?
4) Who is the ancestor of the Tuvaluan monarchy?
5) Does Moravia have any exclaves?
6) Is Astrid, Nordic Empress sister of Beatrix of the Netherlands?
7) How did the Galapagos became a independent country?
8) Why was Maximilian II of Mexico's reign so short?
 
1) How was the Mountbatten name created TTL (as Albion and Germany fought on the same side during WW1)?
ITTL the Mountbatten name was created by the 2nd Duchess, Princess Caroline Windsor de Mountbatten, in the 1940s (although it was an idea even in her parents' heads since the 1930s, when she and her sibling chose to "naturalize" their paternal surname both in a simple desire to do so and to differentiate themselves from their Albany cousins.
Because of that, there are three different ways through which the family surname is known "Windsor de Mountbatten", "Mountbatten" and "Mountbatten-Windsor". This also happened later on with a small branch of the House of Holstein-Gottorp/Oldenburg who moved to Albion and naturalized their house as "Oldcastle" after they became Viscounts of Blakeney
2) Have there been any proposed Imperial Kingdoms that didn't happen?
Oh yes, mainly through the idea being considered fringe even at the time of its proposal, because the person offered declined on its early stages or through unfortunatte happenstance. For example:
- During the early days of the Imperial Kingdoms, there were some semi-serious proposals for creating Princess Beatrice the monarch of a kingdom comprising either the totality or part of Ireland. In a similar vein to that, there were also ideas thrown around about creating an imperial kingdom out of the Isle of Man
- Following his conversion, there were serious talks running around of making Prince Arthur Frederick (the son of Emperor Henry and Mary of Teck) the monarch of "Albish Levant" in the future as either an outright "King of the Levant" or some sort of High King when the idea of the modern confederacy begun
- And during the 1930s there was some serious thinking about creating an imperial kingdom out of West Australia, but it fell through due to changes in the province's political climate and secessionist ideas
3) Why isn't Carniola featured on the map?
Because I needed to update it, now it should appear (although the Dynasties map still needs me to do a more thorough revision so It shouldn't appear there for a bit yet)
4) Who is the ancestor of the Tuvaluan monarchy?
An ITTL Duke of Brunswick, as the House of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel didn't become extinct in 1884 and instead continued, with said duke gaining the throne of Tuvalu when the country (originally a French colony, then a German) became independent (the Duchy of Brunswick passing to his third cousin and brother-in-law as he abdicated his right to it to become king)
5) Does Moravia have any exclaves?
Yes, in a sense, they're more like condominiums between Moravia and Silesia who are also in a manner ruled by five other branches of the House of Hapsburg (so they could be also considered small states within the two, who are also within the greater UHE)
6) Is Astrid, Nordic Empress sister of Beatrix of the Netherlands?
She's her aunt, actually
7) How did the Galapagos became a independent country?
It isn't, Galapagos is a Crown Dependency
8) Why was Maximilian II of Mexico's reign so short?
He died in a train accident (no-kidding, he actually died due to his train suffering a catastrophic derailment while on a visit to Belgium)
 
  1. What Romanian monarch did Archduchess Christina of Austria marry?
  2. Are there other royal houses that changed their names like what the Ablish did with Saxe-Coburg and Gotha/Windsor?
  3. How did Liberia ceased to exist?
  4. Has the Kingdom of Shewa been recreated for Judith, daughter of Menelik III of Ethiopia?
  5. Did the Malian Bonapartes convert to Islam upon the creation of the Malian Caliphate in 1948?
  6. How did the House of Muhammad Ali get to rule a European country?
 
@Peppe still hasn't answered the most important question; is it Derry or Londonderry?
It is Doris, renamed in the 80s as a compromise
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Ok, that was a joke (there is a town of Derry in Australia though who really was renamed to that ITTL)
Actually responding to the question: the city is officially called "Londonderry" in English but "Doire" in Gaelic, while in informal speech it is just called "Derry"
What Romanian monarch did Archduchess Christina of Austria marry?
Archduchess Christina married King Vladimir I of Romania, Maria I's son
Are there other royal houses that changed their names like what the Ablish did with Saxe-Coburg and Gotha/Windsor?
Oh, very-much yes.
Within Albion itself we have the "House of Montival", the rulers of Oregon, whose name was only changed to that from Windsor/Tokugawa during Emma II's reign, and in Europe we also have a similar occurance in Belgium and Sanjak/Raska, whose ruling families have changed their house's names to officially be "of Belgium" and "of Rascia", while in Romania the royal house's name is "House of Basarab", having done so to draw a closer connection to Moldova and Wallachia's original dynasties outside of general familial descent.

There is also something of trend among monarchies established by european royals on post-colonial countries of renaming their branches to bring themselves closer to their new homeland, with main examples being the House of Holstein-Gottorp of Lebanon, who changed its name to the "House of the Serail"; the Hohenzollerns of Namibia, who officially renamed themselves the "House of Hohenzollern-Windhuek" (colloquially called "House of Windhuek"); and the Cilician branch of the House of Said, who although still using the "al Said" on their name have officially named their branch the "House of Saros" in western conventions
How did Liberia ceased to exist?
ITTL the colonization of Liberia with freed people of color was less-successful both in gathering interest in America and in surving in Africa, with the result being that much less people settled on the region (which also had some effects on population numbers on America) and the settler states that were created either died-out due to disease (or terrible relations with local inhabitants) or were annexed by the Germans when the 19th century neared its end (with the most successful of those states, the Republic of Maryland, being the only one to survive in any political sense, "continuing" as the "Free City of Harpour", a state within the German Pepper Coast, while the region itself still has a minority population descended from American settlers).
Has the Kingdom of Shewa been recreated for Judith, daughter of Menelik III of Ethiopia?
No, although for the matters around Judith's title it was never actually ended (technically speaking all provinces of Ethiopia have a nominal "Negus", which is translated as "King" or "Queen", and Shewa, in specific, is a province whose "royal title" is traditionally tied to the positon of Emperor, since Menelik II was King of Shewa before becoming emperor)
Did the Malian Bonapartes convert to Islam upon the creation of the Malian Caliphate in 1948?
Yesn't
How did the House of Muhammad Ali get to rule a European country?
A blurrying of religious lines on the Balkans caused by the Islamic Reformation, Europe's continuously-expanding thumbleweed of a royal family tree (thanks Vicky!) and post-WWII concessions to muslim partisans

(sorry for the vagueness with the last two, from time to time I shamelessly try to see if giving vague answers will make people have more questions for me to respond)
 
If there are any.
Oh, there are (these last two months have seen me work a bit too-much on maps, since after deciding to update the dynasties and governments map I ended-up on a rabbit hole of re-updating the world map, which has seen some added complexity not-yet shown on the thread when I started developing some areas)
Well, I've got some here:

1- Oregon, as was previously mentioned. Originally the country was labeled in my head "JapanxHRE lovechild, in orgy with the Emberverse" with an added bones of "FLORIDA", and so while the map may see relatively straightforward, most places have one-to-seven levels of feudal and pseudo-feudal relationships and organizations, with an added bonus of various exclaves, enclaves, confederacies, weird succession systems, hereditary government offices, mormons, minuscule territories, military authorities outside of all other administrative levels, and a somehow-functioning bureaucracy and central administration
2- perhaps not surprisingly, Germany, who while less complicated than it was during HRE times, is still very much a mess that gets surprisingly more complicated when you move to outside of Europe, since inside of Europe we have about five different types of subdivisions and administrative levels (member states, provinces, viceroyalties who are both member states and provinces, self-governing cities, and member-states that were absorbed into provinces but not really and now exist in both an administrative and ceremonial level), while outside of it we have some other gems, mainly in relation to the "provinces" given to be ruled by branches of the Imperial Family, since in them we not only see various levels of some sort of feudalism (made only more complicated by the existence of semi-nomadic, fully-nomadic, or isolationist tribes), but, if we go to Oceania not only we see those things but also have people deciding that reviving the old german succession laws was a splendid idea (and having the extreme bad luck of producing quite the number of sons before people decided to stop with that). And in the Indian ocean we also can see the antarctic equivalent of Palmerson Island, only smaller and made by a Prussian prince
3-and Tibet, who, not counting the civil war and reincarnation-based succession, has a positively feudal internal structure, since we not only have things like autonomous states shown with different colors on the map but also: religious orders, temples and monasteries that hold feudal authority over bits and pieces of the country (and some of whom have the added bonus of being both hereditary and reincarnation-based on their leadership's succession), de facto kingdoms and petty states that exist on a constituent level but are not "autonomous states", self-governing nomadic/semi-nomadic tribes outside of the direct control of the government, and various de facto independent settlements who exist as their own little countries within Tibet

These are not all of them, though (there are some other ones like Russia, Yunnan, the Hashemites, Jabal Shamar, the UAE, the Philippines, and Malawi; but It's 9:15 Pm here were I live so I'm not with the brain-juices to do a full list and add non-confusing/underwhelming explanations)

So only some of the Malian Bonapartes converted to Islam then?
It's more on the lines of: A turn to Islam was already occurring before the caliphate was created and by the time any offical conversion occured the drawn-out process by which said turn occured meant that the Malian Bonapartes' belief was a mix between Maliki Islam, Folk Religion and Roman Catholicism
 
  1. Did Oleg of Ukraine led his country’s army post WW1?
  2. Are there any elective monarchies in the western world besides Patagonia?
  3. Did Victoria ever open any Olympics?
  4. What's the most watched royal wedding?
  5. Are there any regencies that lasted longer than the Dutch ones?
  6. Have any members of the House of Hesse marry into the Finnish royal family?
  7. When are the updated versions of the maps coming out? And will the old versions be still available to view as well?
 
Sorry for the wait, I've had some shitty few days I couldn't will myself to even use the computer much less try to answer anything
Did Oleg of Ukraine lead his country’s army post WW1?
Very much yes, in fact, I would go so far as call Oleg and his wife (Princess Maria Bagration-Mukhraneli) a competed version of OTL Nicholas II and Alix, since they were co-monarchs in all but name with Maria dealing with the "civilian" part of the monarchy while Oleg served as the Supreme Commander of the Ukrainian military (one of his nicknames being The Marshall King).
In 1935 Maria stepped down (and would die a few years later in '38), and passed her "work" to their eldest daughter and heir, Euphemia, who was made her father's "Junior King" (colloquially known as "the Molodshyy") and served as Ukraine's "civil monarch" until Oleg's death in 1947, at which point her husband, Yuri, who had been groomed by Oleg for it, succeded him as Supreme Commander, and was made Euphemia's official co-monarch as Yuri II (for some reason the Ukrainian monarchs decided to add the Rurikid Kings of Ruthenia when counting regnal numbers).
Are there any elective monarchies in the western world besides Patagonia?
If we assume "Western World" to comprehend Europe and the Americas, there are a few (I'm not going into Australasia and parts of countries outside of Europe or the Americas mainly to save myself some work, since Oceania alone has quite a few elective or elective&hereditary monarchies, many of them in states within European countries*):
- Some of the various states within Oregon are elective monarchies, with Desmond in particular following a variation of tanistry
- Los Altos, in Central America, is also an elective monarchy, with the contenders being the four branches of its royal family and the voters being their pseudo-House of Lords
- (North) Haiti was for a while a semi-elective monarchy, but they scrapped that in the late 19th century
- Similar to Oregon, Brazil also has some subnational elective monarchies, not those of the house of Braganza but in the Indigenous Territories and Palmares, which is a nominally elective monarchy (in the sense that technically any noble can be elected as king by their fellow nobles, but in actuality it has been mantained by a single familial line for hundreds of years)
- Iceland, which is elective in the sense that its monarch's successor is elected from among their children or siblings (or legally approved relatives) by popular vote
- Ukraine could be considered by some as an elective monarchy, as although the monarch has the right to choose who they want to succeed them (or have as a junior or co-monarch), the chosen individual must be approved by the "Rada", or High Council, which is the country's highest council made by Ukraine's general staff and cabinet of ministers with some elder statesmen sprinkled in
- Poland choose to, in memory of the Commonwealth, reinstate an elective monarchy, and although de facto only Kazimierz V's descendants are elegible to be candidates, they aren't restricted to the most recent monarch's offspring and are elected by a national popular vote (although originally the vote was only after a monarch's passing, the monarch has the power to call for said election while alive, either with the intention of abdicating or so as to train their successor as to make a more a smoother process when they do die)
- the Vatican, as in OTL, is an elective monarchy
- the Straits, although an aristocratic republic, could also be considered an elective monarchy, if only because they work on the same manner as Venice, with a lifetime ceremonial head of state elected from among the country's aristocratic families; similar to that there is also Poljica, who has a somewhat-similar system (but with the elected head of state being also the head of government)
- and although not technically elective monarchies, many of the monarchies in Europe do have some sort of "elective safeguard", by which I mean that, although unused, they have the precedent for electing a person lower on the line of succession (or unconnected to it) to take the throne when it is considered the only way of safeguarding the nation or monarchy in some way

* examples include the Northern Cook Islands, which although literally half of one of Germany's ultramarine states ruled by a Hohenzollern, are so autonomous they de facto are an elective monarchy, with the islands' ariki voting among themselves to choose a "viceroy" that de facto serves as their ruler in decade-long terms; and Rapa Nui, which is officially an elective monarchy made by candidates from its royal family (although their historically-low numbers ever since the mid-19th century have caused this to be mainly a ceremonial election)
Did Victoria ever open any Olympics?
Yes, Victoria opened the 1904 Summer Olympics in London
What's the most watched royal wedding?
Numbers aren't exact but from 2000 to 2014, the most watched royal wedding in history was that of Cedric, future Prince of Wales, to Grand Duchess Anastasia of Finland. He then "beat" his own record in 2014 with his marriage to Khanyisile Steenkamp
Are there any regencies that lasted longer than the Dutch ones?
Well, yes, but, much like OTL, they are very few, since the longest of the Dutch ones is Dowager Princess Marie Louise's wopping combined 25-ish years and at some point regencies that get that long stop being actual regencies.
Before saying what they are, just to have some fun, here are a few that, while not surpassing Marie Louise, are still longer than the second-longest Dutch regency (which was Juliana's near 17 years as her mother's regent):
- the previously-mentioned King/Grand-Prince of Estonia was, due to being about 1-month-old when he ascended to the throne, under an 18-year-long regency
- Carlotta I of Portugal was under her uncle's regency for nearly 19 years, with the Duke of Porto probably being the closest to Marie Louise in therms of length of a continuous regency
- and the current Queen of Myanmar/Upper Burma has been under her daughter's regency due to health problems for nearly 22 years

Now, onto regencies that lasted longer than the Dowager Princess, we have two:
- Maria Antonia, Queen of Aotearoa, first served as regent for her son, Roderick II, who was not even 6 at the time of his father's death. Due to Roderick's poor health and hemophilia, Maria Antonia's regency extended beyond him reaching majority, lasting 18 years in total. Then, only about a year after she stepped down, Roderick died, and so Maria Antonia took over as regent for a second time for her granddaughter, Meredith, resulting on a combined 28 years as regent
- and, following with something that happened in OTL, we have Empress Dowager Cixi, who served as her son, Emperor Tongzhi,'s regent from 1861 to 1873, and then returned to the position after a soft coup in 1876, continuing on it after his death in 1884 to serve as the regent to her young grandson until 1899, resulting on a total of 37 years as regent (and of those 37 years, 26 were in a shared regency with Empress Dowager Ci'an)
Have any members of the House of Hesse marry into the Finnish royal family?
Yes, in fact the first Czarina of Finland was a Hessian princess
When are the updated versions of the maps coming out? And will the old versions be still available to view as well?
Well, at the moment I have finished the updated world map but haven't yet finished updating the maps for supranational entities, dynasties and forms of government (I could have been farther ahead on it but I ended-up entering a rabbit hole about phantom islands and spent two days creating a variation of the world's map with said islands added to it*). But nonetheless I'm hoping to finish them soon

About having the old versions available, I hadn't though about that but now I think I could make a post with them as a sort of "memorial" if people want it

* I'm a bit of a fanatic for fictional or alternate landmasses, so the part of me that loves them wants to say fuck it and use the map with the islands added to it (in special since some of them are or could be real islands that sunk below the waves) as the TL's canonical map. But then my rational side reminds me that that would probably be jumping the shark a bit too hard even for the sturdiest of willing suspensions of disbelief
 
  1. Who is the oldest female monarch (excluding Victoria II of Sierra Leone)?
  2. Did Monaco have a succession crisis?
  3. Are Leonard of Albion, Edward X of Lower Burma, and Albert of the Straits triplets?
  4. Who is the ancestor of Guangzhouwan's monarchy?
  5. Are there any fiefdoms in Canada?
  6. Which Moroccan Sultan did Marie of Edinburgh marry?
 
Who is the oldest female monarch (excluding Victoria II of Sierra Leone)?
Although the longest-reigning still-alive monarch, Victoria II of Sierra Leone loses to quite a few in the list of "oldest female monarchs" (some of whom have already appeared on the TL, like Elizabeth II of the Straits, Mary III of Berar, and Empress Isabel of Brazil)

The oldest woman to be a current monarch is actually Queen Teha'apapa V of Huahine and Maia'o (one of the subnational monarchies of Polynesia), who was born in 1923 and assumed her position when she was 84 in 2007, becoming her great-grandson's co-monarch (due to some complicated laws, the monarch of Huahine and Maia'o isn't permitted to have a regent, no matter their age, but is permitted to have a co-monarch who does all the job. So, when her grandson became king at the age of 13, Teha'apapa, who is by birth and by marriage a part of the state's royal family, commited a "preemtive coup" against the rest of the royal family and took the position of co-monarch)

Besides her, other female monarchs older than Victoria II of Sierra Leone are:
- Queen Valéria Tsiomeko III of Boina, who was actually born only a few hours before Victoria II and became queen in 1972
- Bona Nekiok , Kafi Atio/Atiojo of Kaffa (one of Ethiopia's constituent states), her state's first female monarch and born in 1927, assuming the position in 1958
- Sultanata Zawati of Angoche (the smaller of Mozambique's two subnational monarchies), who was born in 1929 and took over as sultana in 1983
Did Monaco have a succession crisis?
No, ITTL while the Grimaldis have had a colorful history, they didn't have any succession crisis since the main POD, although it nearly happened once or twice (much like OTL).

The 1918 Succession Crisis, in specific, was butterflied away by Louis II of Monaco going all-in with his relationship with Marie Juliette Louvet, a widowed laundress he met while serving in the French Army, and openly marrying her, going against the express orders of his father, in 1897.
While a scandal of the highest order to the royalty of Europe, since he had not only married below rank but married a commoner (as normally "bellow rank" would be a noblewoman or a heiress), and nearly causing a succession crisis due to Prince Albert of Monaco initially prohibiting Marie from setting foot in Monaco and threatening to disown his son and heir unless it was annuled (the first revoked and the second not happening due to a mix of luck, time cooling heads, distance making the heart grow fonder, and some good-old familial manipulation/peacemaking by the Princess Consort), the marriage did make Louis a married man, and any children he had with Marie legitimate and capable of inheriting the monegasque throne.

And that's what happened, while Louis had a bunch of illegitimate children on the side, it was one of his sons with Marie who inherited the throne of Monaco
Are Leonard of Albion, Edward X of Lower Burma, and Albert of the Straits triplets?
Yes, all fraternal. Edward and Albert, due to timing, were actually born on different days
Who is the ancestor of Guangzhouwan's monarchy?
The branch of the Hohenzollerns of Guangzhouwan are descended from the youngest of the three sons of Eric VI of Saxe-Lauenburg, Heinrich, being also the oldest cadet branch of the "Imperial Hohenzollerns" after the Saxe-Lauenburgs and the one to marry non-europeans (as Heinrich's grandson, who was actually born in Guangzhouwan, married a chinese noblewoman)
Are there any fiefdoms in Canada?
Well, that's an interesting question.
In Canada, there are three "entities" that could be seen as equivalent to fiefdoms: 1: princely state-like administrative divisions; 2: places with a hereditary/semi-hereditary "ruler" officially recognized by the Canadian government, and 3: administrative divisions with autonomy that isn't present on their "administrative level".

Of the 1st type there are two, one comprehending the Sverdrup Islands and the other the Belcher & Ottawa Islands
Of the 2nd, there are more, on the low hundreds, and are a mix of remnants of the New France seigenuries, some first nation territories, Oregonian-originated fiefdoms, and territories created by special land grants
and, Of the 3rd, there are about as many, and are almost all first nation territories (which are categorized as a special type of county/township/district)

(the latter two also exist in Quebec, who in fact took with itself the overwhelming majority of the seigneurial system's remnants when it became an imperial kingdom)

Technically there are also places where a family has de facto become hereditary rulers, but said "rule" isn't officially recognized by the Canadian government as such
Which Moroccan Sultan did Marie of Edinburgh marry?
Marie married to Sultan Abdelaziz, who was only a few months her senior. The union was actually a bit of a scandal at the time, as they met in a coincidence while visiting Tangier in 1896, and eloped after knowing each other for about three weeks.
Although the marriage was considered scandalous at the beginning and nearly caused Abdelaziz to be deposed, it did help safeguard Morocco's independence, and Marie's actions to raise their public approval helped in tempering discontentment over husband's government policies.
The marriage wasn't incredibly happy, but most problems in their relationship was caused by politics as Marie was disliked by many in court and came to be seen as the only thing keeping her husband in power, as her familial connections' possible response was seen as the only thing stopping people from trying to depose Abdelaziz.
After their eldest became of age, Abdelaziz abdicated to him, and the two lived the rest of their days either in Tangiers, visiting her relatives, or Casablanca
 
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  1. Did Abdulmejid II of Adakale abdicate?
  2. Are there any notable branches of the House of Liechtenstein?
  3. Does Poland have any exclaves?
  4. Do any male-line descendants of the House of Windsor rule territory in Germany?
  5. When was the most recent time that a monarch lead their country's army into battle?
  6. Were the Olympics ever canceled or delayed?
  7. How does the Prince of Monaco descend from Victoria?
  8. When did the Palatinate gain it’s own monarchy separate from Bavaria?
 
Did Abdulmejid II of Adakale abdicate?
Which Abdulmejid II of Adakale?
There is Abdulhamid II, the Ottoman Sultan who is the ancestor of Adakale's ruling family, but he died in the early 1920s even before the Ottoman Empire collapsed, Abdulmejid III is the first ruler of Adakale to be named "Abdulmejid"
Are there any notable branches of the House of Liechtenstein?
Well, besides the branch who rules Liechtenstein, the family has a few branches who are known outside of their involvement with Liechtenstein:
- The Hapsburg-Liechtenstein (also known as Liechtenstein-Hollenegg) branch. Descended from Prince Franz de Paula (second son of Johan I Joseph of Liechtenstein), who received from his father the castles of Hollenegg and Frauental in Styria as a secundogeniture, the branch never became Princes of Liechtenstein ITTL, and instead ended-up mixing with the Hapsburgs with the marriage of its heir to the Archduchess/Princess of the Vorarlberg in the 20th century
- The Riegersburg branch and Rosegg branches, descended from Prince Karl Johann (third son of Johan I Joseph of Liechtenstein), known mainly for being highly involved in the government and military of the UHI as well as for their eponymous castles (Riegersburg being both a museum (providing both traditional and reenactment-based contents) and hotel on top of a volcanic hill while Rosegg is a famous wildlife reserve and zoo); one of the Rosegg's own branches is also Austria's closest equivalent to the Kardashians
- The Manus branch (often known as the House of Lichtenstein-Lorengau). Descended from Prince Friedrich Adalbert (fourth son of Johan I Joseph of Liechtenstein), it is marked for being the branch of the rulers of the Manus (or Admiralty) Islands in Melanesia, having basically bought the islands from Germany in the late 19th century and proceeding to establish their own small domains that were later recognized by Germany as some of its marine member-states
- The Liechtenstein Family of Canada, a family of actors descended from Prince Eduard Franz, fifth son of Johan I Joseph of Liechtenstein, through a grandson of his who migrated to the Americas
- and The Kirchberg branch, descended from Prince August Ludwig (sixth son of Johan Joseh I of Liechtenstein), who after generations of being basically a footnote on the family's history became known for turning their estate, Kirchberg Castle, into a nudist colony
Does Poland have any exclaves?
Poland doesn't have any exclaves, although it does have a "special relation" with Poznan-West Prussia that makes the viceroyalty almost a "pseudo-condominium" between Poland and Germany
Do any male-line descendants of the House of Windsor rule territory in Germany?
The Dukes of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha and the Dukes of Arenberg
When was the most recent time that a monarch lead their country's army into battle?
Sincerely? Probably December 2020 ITTL

I'm not trying to joke or anything, and I have thought about it. The reason I give an answer that is basically "last month" is because ITTL monarchs directly involved with their country's military, even after becoming monarchs, isn't that uncommon, and even if in most cases that involvement is by being an active part of the military command, that isn't the norm, with, for example, the two major civil wars in Africa ITTL, in Zanzibar and Sokoto, both having monarchs (or pretenders/claimants) actively commanding their forces in battle.

The last monarch to die in battle, though, that I can give you a date, it was in 24 May 2007 when Sovereign (宋帝) Mengfei of Hainan was killed during the First Battle of Haikou
Were the Olympics ever canceled or delayed?
Yes, much in the same way as OTL Olympics, during the world wars
How does the Prince of Monaco descend from Victoria?
The current Prince's mother is a great-granddaughter of Victoria, being the youngest child of the 10th Duke of Devonshire
When did the Palatinate gain it’s own monarchy separate from Bavaria?
Bavaria and the Palatinate firstly gained separate rulers during the early 20th century, but at the time the Palatinate was considered a "secundogeniture" of Bavaria given to a Bavarian prince who converted and married into the Prussian Hohenzollerns and as such was still seen as a part of Bavaria, the two only officially became separate in the later half of the century with the reestructuring of Germany's internal borders
 
  1. Are there any similar "monarch in-training" roles for the heir apparent besides Stadholder of Friesland for the Dutch?
  2. Which monarch was opened the most Olympics?
  3. What's the most watched coronation?
  4. Are there any fiefdoms in Australia?
  5. Did Adolphus and Francis II share the title of Duke of Teck together?
  6. Have any members of the Swedish branch of the House of Holstein-Gottorp marry into the modern day Swedish royal family?
  7. When was the title of Grand Prince of the Rus’ created?
 
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