Albion, where the Sun never set

Are you liking this TL?

  • Yes I like it!

    Votes: 10 66.7%
  • Mostly but it could be better

    Votes: 5 33.3%
  • Some parts are good but mostly not

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • No, I don't like it

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    15
I am enjoying this TL. I would like more infomation about the various parts of the Empire.
I second that. Would be interesting how more active Royals have shaped various countries. Important or just plain interesting events and organisations are also good.
 
The Parliamentary Garb Act of 1909
1604703078070.png
The Parliamentary Garb Act 1909 is an Act of the Parliament of the Empire of Albion and the Commonwealth. The Act introduced for the first time overarching regulations to what can and cannot be worn inside the Houses of Parliament.

While it is believed that the act was proposed by the 1st Duchess of Halifax (then MP for Paddington North) as an elaborate joke. As she believed that the proposal to forcibly create a fashion code for the Lords and Commons would be dismissed rapidly. The timing of the proposal, mere weeks into the first session of Parliament since the death of Empress Victoria when most of the Empire was still in mourning, resulted on an almost unanimous vote of 698 to 32 passing it to the Lords, who in turn voted in an equally fast pace to send it for Royal Assent.

Still in action to this day, the act stipulates that no person within either the Lords or Commons may wear clothing in a style that was not worn during the Victorian Era, in a remembrance of the Empress' reign.

Although many MPs have proposed to repeal the act over the years (the most recent being Nigel Corbyn, Labour MP for Saint Philip between 2003 and 2015, in a move that preceded the end of his political career), it has remained in place for over a century and influenced in other aspects of political events, with it being traditional to wear victorian clothing on the day of the State Opening of Parliament and for candidates to dress similarly during speeches, debates and on polling day during the General Election.

As per the Windsor Agreement of 1978, the act is also in action on the governments of all members of the Commonwealth.


1604735895472.png

Princess Victoria, Duchess of Halifax (1862-1942), then Victoria Windsor, Independent MP for Paddington North and Princess Louis of Battenberg, having a lunch with her daughter, Princess Caroline (later 2nd Duchess of Halifax), in the gardens of Kensington Palace. Dated to 1912​
 
Last edited:
A head's up on what I'm currently planning for the TL (may change if I have any new idea or reach a block):
1 - The 1930 El Salvadorian Coup (or, "Mr. President, you really shouldn't have chosen the cheapest catering company for your marriage anniversary")​
2 - Canada, its government, its people, and its grudge-holding​
3 - WWII (or, "The War of the Eight Coalition")​
4 - Richard, the Duke of Yeovil (or, "That time the laws of succession were changed so this guy couldn't inherit")​
5 - Indo-Anglicanism, in broad strokes​
6 - Conservationism, the tradition of the elites
7 - The United Fruit Company, (or, "How a Swabian Duke and an Albish Prince control 60% of Costa Rica's economy")​
8 - The American Exiles
9 - The Moon, Mars and the Asteroid Belt (or, "Why the Sun really will never set on the Albish Empire")​
10 - The Mexican Cartel War (or, "They really shouldn't have messed up with the Hapsburgs")​
11?- The Heirs to Albion, their joys and sorrows​
12?- Oregon, its people, its rulers and its "quirks"​
 
Last edited:
7 - The United Fruit Company, (or, "How a Swabian Duke and an Albish Prince control 60% of Costa Rica's economy")8 - The American Exiles9 - The Moon, Mars and the Asteroid Belt (or, "Why the Sun really will never set on the Albish Empire")10 - The Mexican Cartel War (or, "They really shouldn't have messed up with the Hapsburgs")

These four sound the most interesting to me so I cannot wait until you get to them
 
View attachment 597598The Parliamentary Garb Act 1909 is an Act of the Parliament of the Empire of Albion and the Commonwealth. The Act introduced for the first time overarching regulations to what can and cannot be worn inside the Houses of Parliament.

While it is believed that the act was proposed by the 1st Duchess of Halifax (then MP for Paddington North) as an elaborate joke. As she believed that the proposal to forcibly create a fashion code for the Lords and Commons would be dismissed rapidly. The timing of the proposal, mere weeks into the first session of Parliament since the death of Empress Victoria when most of the Empire was still in mourning, resulted on an almost unanimous vote of 698 to 32 passing it to the Lords, who in turn voted in an equally fast pace to send it for Royal Assent.

Still in action to this day, the act stipulates that no person within either the Lords or Commons may wear clothing in a style that was not worn during the Victorian Era, in a remembrance of the Empress' reign.

Although many MPs have proposed to repeal the act over the years (the most recent being Nigel Corbyn, Labour MP for Saint Philip between 2003 and 2015, in a move that preceded the end of his political career), it has remained in place for over a century and influenced in other aspects of political events, with it being traditional to wear victorian clothing on the day of the State Opening of Parliament and for candidates to dress similarly during speeches, debates and on polling day during the General Election.

As per the Windsor Agreement of 1978, the act is also in action on the governments of all members of the Commonwealth.

View attachment 597681
Princess Victoria, Duchess of Halifax (1862-1942), then Victoria Windsor, Independent MP for Paddington North and Princess Louis of Battenberg, having a lunch with her daughter, Princess Caroline (later 2nd Duchess of Halifax), in the gardens of Kensington Palace. Dated to 1912

So, dressed more like the members of the Japanese parliament, I suppose.
 
1930 Salvadorian Coup
1605119789937.png
The 1930 Salvadorian coup d'état was the first of the Latin American Coups backed by Brazil that occurred in the 1930s and 1940s. Occurring in 20 July 1930 when a group of army officers and revolutionaries took over the Presidential Palace, Quinta Natalina, and, following a battle with the forces of General Vice-President Maximiliano Hernández Martínez, overthrew President Jorge Meléndez Ramírez, leading to the establishment of the Kingdom of El Salvador.

Controlled by the Meléndez-Quinonez "Dynasty" since 1914, who ruled the country as ruthless oligarchical dictators, El Salvador faced widespread political tension and public unrest in the late 1920s, as most of the country lived in poverty under the whims of the coffee barons who backed the presidency while the military had also become divided between General Hernández and then Colonel Osmín Aguirre y Salinas.

Although plans of coups had been disjointedly whispered among members of the military and political class since 1928, it was only in 1930 that an united front appeared when Colonel Aguirre, helped by Brazilian agents, entered in contact with then Minister of Interior, Pio Romero Bosque, a known liberal, and with Fernando Tokugawa[1], a Japanese nobleman turned landowner who held an unofficial position of authority among El Salvador's large Japanese minority[2]; establishing with them a species of "triumvirate" in leading what became the Force of National Change.

Planned through the first half of 1930, during which the leaders of the FNC, using Tokugawa and Romero Bosque's influence, expanded their forces, flooding the army with Japanese soldiers and officers. One of the main points of the strategy was the using of a bankrupt catering company, Carrera & Sons, as a basis for the entire coup, as they basically propped the failed business and then used Romero Bosque's position on government to manipulate the president into choosing it to cater for his wedding anniversary in July 20th, seeing as the price tag was "so cheap it was almost like a gift".

Dressing their men as workers of the company and filling a specially prepared 10 feet tall cake shell with weapons for them to use, the plotters managed to take over the presidential palace in a matter of minutes that way, and, following the Battle of Quinta Natalia, during which Tokugawa lost an eye from a gunshot and where General Hernández was killed by a grenade, they took over as a temporary government, forcing President Meléndez to abdicate and flee in exile to Honduras[3].

Influenced (and possibly pressured) by the Brazilian ideas of social-monarchism (by then the mainstream political ideology of the empire), it wasn't long before the Transition Government (as they came to be called, being at the time known as the "Cabinet for National Change"), whose original ideas didn't greatly differ from those of Lenin, started to ponder on the idea of making the nation a monarchy in lines similar to those on Brazil. Following the 1932 Peruan Revolution, which placed the House of Saxe-Coburg-Kohary[4] as monarchs of Peru, the Transitional Government finally came to a decision, and, following a referenda on the matter[5], enthroned President Tokugawa as King Fernando of El Salvador, whit Romero Bosque (then Vice-President) becoming the "Minister of the Right" and Anquirre y Salinas (then Minister of Defence) "Minister of the Left" in a strange nod to ancient Japanese ceremonial government positions[6].

[1] Born Joichiro Tokugawa, a son of Tokugawa Akitake (Head of the Mito-Tokugawa Branch), in 1884, he moved to El Salvador in the late 1910s, converted to Catholicism and used his inheritance to become a landowner (marrying twice to wealthy heiresses also helped on that)
[2] Following the Brazilian Civil War, coffee prices skyrocketed as the country's coffee production plummeted due to the conflict, because of that, the other producers of the bean in Latin America saw a rise in demand and, at least in El Salvador's case, a need for more workers as their coffee production's had to be expanded. Because of that, and the impoverished state of rural Japan following the Meiji Restoration, a large number of poor Japanese ended up immigrating to El Salvador, between the end of the 19th century and the 1930s. By 1932, around 15% of the country's total population comprehended either immigrants of first generation descendants, and in modern times over half of the population has some Japanese ancestry
[3] Where he would (with the help of his brother-in-law/predecessor) try and fail to stir up trouble and ask for Honduran support in overthrowing his overthrowers. For his trouble, he was found dead from a "hear attack" in 1933 on his rooms, a strangely bloody heart attack in fact
[4] Now known as the "Saxe-Coburg of Peru", they are possibly the closest royal dynasty to the Tokugawas (maybe with the exception of the Montivals), and various marriages between them and mainly the El Salvador branch have resulted in them representing an unnaturally large percentage of the nobility and political class for a group that only started moving in after '37
[5] Officially 92% of the population voted "yes", unofficially, there was a quite large bit of voter fraud
[6] They remain to this day in El Salvador, with the Minister of the Right being officially the position of the highest civilian member of the government while the Minister of the Left is his military counterpart​
 
Last edited:
Social Monarchism and the Baron Lenin New
(I know this is already going out of the planned schedule, the reason why I'm posting this now is because I posted a version of this on the "Alternate Ideologies" thread over two months ago and didn't do the same here yet)​

Social Monarchism (also called Leninism) is a philosophical, social, political and economic ideology developed by Russian professor, journalist and government official Vladimir Ulyanov that proposes the establishment of the "monarchy for the proletariat", led by an all-powerful monarch, as a prelude to the establishment of communism. Based upon the historical example of so-called "proto-communism" present in the Incan Empire's economy, the Russian idea of the monarch as a father-like figure, the Roman ideas of nobility and Ulyanov's own experiences in the Imperial Court, the Leninist monarchy has the function of providing stability and safety in communism by "bearing the burden of rulership", and beforehand to serve as (together with a politically conscious "vanguard party") a rallying point for the working class to enact a "revolution from within"

Originally focused on the Russian Empire's struggles, Leninism has, since its establishment in 1899 with Ulyanov's publishing of "The Monarch and the People", greatly expanded from that, being affected greatly by Hegelian dialectics, which see the ideology as a synthesis of monarchism (or capitalism) and Marx's revolutionary ideals, as well as being influenced by other socialist or political ideologies, in special the Latin American ideas of religious communism, an ironic turn in light of Ulyanov's own ambiguous opinion of religion.

Serving as the basis of governments across the globe and influencing many others, critics of the ideology frequently draw upon its basis on an absolute monarch to say that Leninism is nothing more than a branch of neo-absolutism or a pretext for monarchical dictatorship, and the followers of most other branches of communism or socialism consider Leninism a corrupted twisting of Marx's ideas

1605721336401.png

Vladimir Ilyich Ulyanov (22 April 1870 - 30 September 1932), better known by his title of Baron Lenin, was a Russian revolutionary, professor, political theorist and government oficial. He worked as a professor at the Saint Petersburg Imperial University from 1896 to 1918, serving as its Rector from 1918 to 1925, and served as Private Secretary to the Empress Dowager Eudoxia Antonova of Russia from 1902 to 1925.

Born to a prosperous middle-class family in Simbirsk, being the son of a civil servant, Lenin was introduced to revolutionary socialist politics by his brother, Aleksandr. Offered an imperial scholarship, he moved to Saint Petersburg in 1889 to study at the Imperial University. Introduced to court and imperial family in the early 1890s by a friend, Anton Tchaikovsky, whose own family held a high esteem among the Romanovs, he came under the influence of Empress consort Eudoxia, whom he called "as much of a mother as the one in Simbirsk" and would remain loyal to for the rest of her life. Graduating at the Faculty of History and Philology in 1895, he was hired as a professor there the following year, becoming known for his lectures on Russian and political history. In 1899 he published his most famous work, The Monarch and the People, under a pseudonym. In 1902 he became one of the two Private Secretaries of the dowager empress, whom he saw as a second mother, and in 1905 became second-in-command for the Matrony together with Nadezhda Krupskaya. The previous year he married Natalya Tchaikovskaya, daughter and only child of the famous composer, whom he had met in a party in 1901.

As one of the leaders of the Matrony, Lenin became infamous as one of the empress' most capable enforcers, using his position and that of his siblings to infiltrate and hunt down dozens of revolutionary cells, being sometimes identified as the one responsible for the death of his own older brother, Aleksandr, when the Matrony extinguished the Narodnaya Volya. A charismatic demagogue and professor, Lenin initially spread his ideology among the ranks of the faculty and students of the Saint Petersburg Imperial University, from where he would recruit many agents for the Matrony, and would influence the creation of the Tsar's Party following the 1906 Revolution. In 1918 he was elected the university's rector, a position he would hold until 1925, when, following the death of Empress Eudoxia, he retired, being granted the title of "Baron Lenin" by Ivan VII in 1926.

A periodical presence at the Russian court following his retirement, giving annual speeches at the graduations of the Imperial University until 1931, when, following a debilitating stroke, he received a hereditary lease from Ivan VII to live in Vladimir Palace, on the suburbs of Saint Petersburg, where he died in 1932 of a stroke in his sleep, at the age of 62.

Originally buried in Pavlovsk Cemetery, Saint Petersburg, his remains are currently buried at the Imperial Mausoleum in Moscow, being one of the first bodies to be buried there following its construction in 1948.
 
Top