Air and Space Photos from Alternate Worlds.

There's a World of Warplanes "2"?
I've never played it and was googling hurriedy while a bit drunk, I was just going on the line "It was relaunched as World of Warplanes 2.0 in October 2017" from Wikipedia :coldsweat: But yeah, looking again now they don't bother using numbers in the name, it's more a build version number.
 
I've never played it and was googling hurriedy while a bit drunk, I was just going on the line "It was relaunched as World of Warplanes 2.0 in October 2017" from Wikipedia :coldsweat: But yeah, looking again now they don't bother using numbers in the name, it's more a build version number.
OK I thought maybe there was a another version I didn't know about.
 
Established in 1949, The Ohio Aerial Militia is the only active aviation group of all extant American State Defense Forces that maintains fixed-wing aviation capacity (as opposed to the base support missions that the forces in several other states retain). As a result, OhAM is unique, and presents opportunities for planespotters.

The most common aircraft in OhAM is the Cessna 172R. When not engaging in training, the aircraft are often seen working with Ohio Wing Civil Air Patrol, Ohio State Highway Patrol, and other local aviation assets in support of civil authorities.
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The oldest aircraft in the fleet are the (A)T-28M 'Turbo' Trojans. Built in Columbus in the 1950s, and rebuilt with turboprop engines in the early 1970s, these stalwart airframes have been used as advanced trainers for over fifty years. In the convulsions of post-9/11 security theater the OhAM was authorized to have the aircraft equipped for 'Civil Air Defense' and USAF/USANG stockpiles of ammunition were to be opened up, allowing the planes to, in theory, fire guns and short range air to air missiles. Outside of some brief training exercises, the aircraft have not been so equipped.
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The age of the 'Turbo' Trojan has been an issue for over a decade, and the 2015 selection of the replacement has not resulted in a rapid retirement of the old birds. The replacement aircraft, expected to reach Initial Operating Capability in 2024 is the Textron AirLand Scorpion. These aircraft will be the first two-seat jets in OhAM service, and with their added speed and payload, are expected to provide improved civil support functions such as surveying, and other reconnaissance capabilities. Many in state government have questioned the selection of the type, with a focus on the reasons why the T-6 Texan II was not selected given the increasing costs to maintain the T-28 fleet.
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The largest aircraft in OhAM service is by far the C-27J Spartan. These twin-turboprop transports are often seen outside of Ohio deploying Ohio Task Force One or other civil aide to outside states around the USA. The airframes in use were all originally USAF aircraft, and were transferred to OhAM from Ohio ANG's 179th Airlift wing following USAF retirement of the type in 2013. The transport role in OhAM was previously filled by C-7 Carribous, which were also ex-USAF airframes. It is not uncommon to see some of these aircraft being used to support domestic Ohio ANG missions. Because of increased rates of deployment outside of Ohio, these aircraft sport a livery that is considered to be 'more friendly' than the mostly blue-and-white scheme found on smaller OhAM aircraft.
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Kármán-Lloyd Colomen aircraft profiles.jpg
The Kármán-Lloyd Colomen (Kymrese for "Dove"), a very successful monoplane developed and mostly manufactured in the Kingdom of Kymria, from my fictional Aeroverse setting.

As there have since been newer versions of the Colomen, by the same company and also some licensed manufacturers outside of Kymria, this original design is often called the "Ur-Colomen" (original Colomen) to distinguish it from its newer relatives.

The Ur-Colomen has seen successful use as both a military scoutplane (and occassional support aircraft) and as a civilian courier aeroplane (for ground-based aerodromes, but even some freighter airships as well) in countless aerofreighting guilds and larger aerofreighting companies. The most popular and most common version of the aircraft is the two-seater configuration, which you can see in all of these aircraft profiles.

Why doesn't it have cylinders protruding from underneath the engine cover ? Because, like all contemporary planes of the Aeroverse, even most of the Ur-Colomens had long since switched to an electric aircraft engine, powered by very economic and very resilient aetherium batteries. The Colomen most commonly uses aetherium sludge/slurry as the electrolyte of its batteries, but batteries with an aetherium solution as electrolyte are also a perfectly valid option. If you look closely at the engine area of all four specimens, there is a smaller, secondary axle just below the main axle of the propeller. This is related to how many of the electric engines in the setting work.

The first depicted military Colomen of the Royal Flying Host of Kymria (Llu Hedfan Brenhinol o Kymra) is decorated with the more recent revision to the aircraft markings and aviation roundel of the RFH, whereas the second specimen shown displays the slightly older (albeit almost identical) design pattern and slightly older (less abstract) RFH roundel.

The reason the two civilian specimens have an added metal rail frame on the outside of their fuselage, is to provide an attachment point for storage cases and storage boxes. These are practical when carrying out various courier roles, as there often isn't enough storage space inside the aircraft itself.

(The aircraft is, of course, based on the famous Etrich Taube monoplane, developed by Igo Etrich of Austria-Hungary and used by many early air forces before and during WWI. It was one of the first practical military aircraft in the world, and the first to successfully conduct a small bombing raid. The two-seater version is based on the real two-seater version manufactured by the Rumpler company - Rumpler Taube - during WWI.

Much like
the real world Taube, the Colomen is also not a fighter plane and not built to be one, even if it theoretically might be equippable with a very light machine gun. If you want to use a gun from this thing, bring a rifle, pistol or machine-pistol and hope your spotter can have good aim. Kármán is a hidden reference to the OTL aeronautic engineer, whereas Lloyd, though it sounds undoubtably like a Welsh name, was an OTL Austro-Hungarian aircraft manufacturer in the 1910s. Kymria has cultural elements of both Wales and Austria-Hungary, so it's remarkably fitting. For a Kymrian car, see here.

Image credits:
FiddlersGreen.com (paper models) - Rumpler Taube aircraft profile art by unknown authors, modified by me)
 
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Kármán-Lloyd New Colomen aircraft profiles.jpg
The Kármán-Lloyd Colomen Newydd (Kymrese for "New Colomen", "New Dove") was one of the later variants of the original Colomen from my fictional Aeroverse setting. Equally successful and manufactured in large numbers, it was seen almost wholly in the services of the Royal Flying Host of Kymria (Llu Hedfan Brenhinol o Kymra). Naturally, like the previous Colomen, this one was also powered by a more lightweight electric engine, powered by more light-weight aetherium batteries.

Aside from the somewhat shorter length, one of the key differences was a more fish-tail like design for the tail of the airframe, rather than the more unique and somewhat more old-fashioned split-tailed design of the original Colomen (Ur-Colomen). The overall configuration and design continued the observation and recon role of the original plane for the needs of the Royal Flying Host.

(This aircraft is, of course, based on the Taube 4C (Rumpler 4C), a later evolution/derivative of the two-seater Rumpler Taube. Brought in line with other more modern monoplane and biplane designs by mid-WWI, this was one of the late successful successors of the original Taube design.

Image credits:
Zygmunt Szeremeta - Rumpler Taube 4C aircraft profile cover art (2007), for Choroszy Modelbud, modified by me)
 
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Royal Flying Host of Kymria (miniatures).jpg
Miniatures of various monoplanes and biplanes serving the Royal Flying Host of Kymria during its early years. All under 10 m.​

(These are all based on Austro-Hungarian aircraft of the 1900s and 1910s. The Taube monoplanes, the Lloyd and Phönix company biplanes, the license-built Albatros biplanes, the latter manufactured at A-H's Oesterreichische Flugzeugfabrik AG, Oeffag for short. Though some aspects of Kymria are very Welsh, some aspects are very Austro-Hungarian, right down to the very Austro-Hungarian style of aeroplanes.

Modified by me. Original/base image credits:
-
Rumpler Taube (Fiddler's Green.com)
- Rumpler Taube 4C - author: Zygmunt Szeremeta (for Choroszy Modelbud)
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Lloyd C.II - authors: Eswube and Rhade (Shipbucket)
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Lloyd C.V - authors: Eswube and Rhade (Shipbucket)
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Albatros Oeffag D.III - authors: Eswube, Rhade and Naixoterk (Shipbucket)
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Phönix D.III - author: Darth Panda (Shipbucket)
 
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Smiley dressed in high-altitude clothing during a high ascent by the Nimrod.jpg


Until I complete or create more plane overviews of Kymria and other countries, here's something a little different from the Aeroverse.

Smiley, from my main story series set in that fictional universe, is a crew member of the Nimrod rigid airship aerofreighter and member of the Falconer Cloudways guild that owns and operates the ship. Here you can see her shortly after donning high-altitude aeronaut clothing, during one of the infrequent but occassional ascents of the Nimrod into very high altitudes. The clothing is meant to protect from the cold.

You can only see Smiley's eyes and a small bit of her face around the eyes, so I've also included a B&W photo of her in the lower left corner (it's a black and white photo because colour photography is not widespread in their world yet, despite being technically possible).

As the crew members all have proper personal cabins with proper beds, the bunk bed seen in this room is merely a temporary sleeping place. It's used by whoever has the night shift or maintenance shift in the airship's hold, engine rooms, aetherium gas cell areas, or even the outside lookouts.

(The high-altitude protective clothing is based on real world British and Canadian high-altitude clothing used in WWI. The interior is actually an exhibit in the British airship museum at Cardington, showing one of the few preserved duraluminium bunk beds used on the R100 airship.

Though the Nimrod has some creature comforts for the crew in the relatively small living quarters section, the Nimrod is in essence an airship truck, never designed as a comfy airliner, so it's not that surprising the crew sometimes have to dress more like the crews of WWI era military airships, and the Aeroverse's own military airships of various countries.

It's one thing to talk about the Nimrod, its crew, or other airships and their crews in the Aeroverse, but it's another thing entirely to offer a more life-like image in colour that offers you a more tangible visual aid to how life and duties on such an airship would roughly look and feel like. I do want to do colourised photos of other rooms on the ship, but it takes time, so here's just a quick little sample.)
 
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Comrade Harps Fry of South Africa special (alongeside the previous Tempest II and Starfighter)

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Stephen Fry Pt 2: Grumman F11F-3 Tiger​

Description
Link: www.whatifmodellers.com/index.…

Grumman F11F-3 Tiger
a/c 302/S, 2 Squadron, SAAF
Dakhla, Spanish Sahara, 12 August 1958
Personal mount of Captain Stephen Fry

The deck career of Grumman's F11F-1 Tiger was brief. Operated from US Navy flattops as a stop-gap fighter until the introduction of Vought F8U Crusaders, the Tiger served with Navy combat units for just 5 years. Rapidly consigned to advanced training duties by the Navy, the US Marine Corps nethertheless found an ongoing frontline niche for the Tiger. Over 8 years, the USMC used their fighter-bomber F11F-2s in Africa, Asia and Latin America. Cheap, efficient and supersonic in level flight, the Grumman gave every appearance of being an export winner, but several factors worked against it. As a land-based fighter-bomber, the export oriented F11F-3 had the unfortunate position of being available at a time when it was competing against established high-end subsonic types (like the Dassault Canada Mystere IV, Canadair Sabre 6, the CAC CA-27 Sabre and the F-86H Sabre) and the first generation of supersonics (such as the F-100, F-104 and the Super Mystere, all of which were faster). Used to selling their products to naval operators, Grumman's marketing team failed to impress air forces with their F11F-3 sales pitch.

Brigadier Brian Boyle of the SAAF was an ace, with 5 kills credited to him in 1943-44. A highly regarded pilot and officer, in January 1953 he was assigned the duty of leading a team to define the SAAF's fighter requirements over the next ten years. After a tour of briefings, displays and test flights at leading aircraft manufacturers in Canada and the US, Boyle presented his report in July. The Decadal Fighter Evaluation Report, better known as The Boyle Report, recommended a two-stage procurement strategy. The first stage was referred to as The Interim Supersonic Fighter. Detailing how many of the emerging generation of supersonic fighters were immature platforms with questionable reliability, safety and delivery schedules, Boyle recommended the adoption of a low risk interim solution. Although it was yet to have its first flight, the Report noted that the aircraft that best met requirements was the Grumman F11F-3 Tiger. Differing from the Navy and Marine versions in lacking carrier-specific equipment, such as folding wings, the dash 3 was tailored to airfield operations. Although it retained the arrestor hook of the carrier versions, the -3 replaced the retractable tail bumper with a chaff/flare cartridge pack. Thanks to its lighter but stronger wings, it also featured wingtip Sidewinder rails. The Report noted that the Tiger was a "modest iteration" of Grumman's successful F9F series, represented a "conservative" engineering risk and promised to be the most maneuverable of the UN's first generation of supersonic fighters. Significantly, if acquired directly from the Grumman production line, it could be in combat with the SAAF by early 1957. This assessment proved to be accurate; although the F-100 Super Sabre was technically in USAF squadron service before the F11F-3, the dash 3 Tiger beat the North American product into combat service. The second stage was what Boyle labeled The 1960 Mach 2 Fighter. Acknowledging the SAAF staff's preference for single seat, single engine fighters, the Boyle Report eschewed detailed discussion of the F4H Phantom II and recommended in-depth evaluations of the F-104 and Mirage III. Brigadier Boyle would later recommend the Mirage, but the selection of the F-104E to be followed by the F-104G would be a political one assisted by a spectacular measure of corruption. However, with this scandal still in the future, 120 F11F-3 Tigers were duly ordered from Grumman's Bethpage factory.

The F11F-3 Tiger was not Stephen Fry's first jet fighter. That milestone would go to a Koolhoven-built F-86F. After a secondment flying Tempest FB.21s with the Free Spanish Air Force, Fry was assigned to an instructor pilot position. Following a course on the T-33A jet trainer, He converted to the Sabre and taught others how to employ the swept wing fighter as a weapons system. In 1956 he switched to the new F11F-3 Tiger, being a member of the first cadre of SAAF pilots to train on the type. In October 1956 Fry joined 2 Squadron as its Qualified Weapons Officer and deployed to the frontline in March 57. 2 Squadron would fly the Tiger as a fighter-bomber, while 1 Squadron (which had simultaneously converted to the new mount) would fly it purely as a fighter. 7 Squadron and 11 Squadron SAAF would also take the Tiger into combat over North Africa.

Fry would have a turbulent experience flying the F11F-3. He would be credited with five victories, but would be shot down twice (once after flack damage, once after cannon damage from a Socialist Algerian Fresco), use the tail hook for a wheels-up landing at an emergency airstrip and be forced to eject from another Tiger after running out of fuel. That time he landed in a contested region and shot at several of the Senegalese Tirailleurs (French speaking black Africans serving on behalf of the Free French) that had been dispatched to rescue him. He continued to evade friendlies until an all-white Free French Foreign Legion patrol found him. He did much better when being rescued by white helicopter crews.

A rundown of Fry's credited victories in the F11F-3 Tiger follows:

- 16 April 1957: Socialist Union Fresco A, with AIM-9B
- 5 August 1957: Socialist Moroccan Fluffy D, with AIM-9B and cannon
- 23 August 1957: Hungarian Farmer C with AIM-9B
- 7 June 1958; Basque Fluffy F, cannon kill
- 13 June 1958: Socialist Algerian Farmer C with AIM-9B

Stephen Fry would go on to fly, fight and kill in F-104E Starfighters and F-101E Voodoos. In the latter, he committed what has been described as a war crime.

The model depicts Captain Fry's aircraft, 302/S, as it was photographed on 12 August 1958. Armed with four 20mm cannon, two LAU-3 rocket pods and two AIM-9B Sidewinders, the plane is prepared for a flak suppression sortie. UN documents record that 2 Squadron SAAF took part in Operation Offer 33 that day, an attack mission against Red logistical targets in and around Marrakech, Socialist Morocco. In fierce fighting, the Reds lost 5 planes (but only 1 pilot KIA), while the UN lost 8 planes shot down (7 aircrew POW, 3 KIA and 2 rescued). One of the UN planes lost that day was this aircraft, Captain Fry being forced to eject when his flak-damaged engine lost power south of Angarf. He was gratefully picked up by the all white crew of a Canadian CH-126 rescue chopper.

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Fry of Sth Africa Pt.4: McDonnell F-101E Voodoo​

Description
Link: www.whatifmodellers.com/index.…

McDonnell F-101E Voodoo
a/c 604 24 Squadron, South African Air Force (SAAF)
Air Force Base Waterkloof, 13 October 1966
Crew: Kommandant Stephen Fry (pilot) and Luitenant Jan Hendrik de Beer (navigator)

By the mid-1950s, the USAF's all-weather attack aviation aspirations were proving to be problematic. The Century Series aircraft were not designed to meet the ever-growing requirements demanded by the Bomber Mafia within the Pentagon and the next-generation of all-weather attack platforms were still years away. Meanwhile, the existing interdiction bomber force of B-57 Canberras and B-66 Destroyers were rapidly becoming obsolete for the job of penetrating Red airspace. With vision outstripping hardware, the frustrations of Air Force Generals resulted in a bewildering series of programs, many of which were seen as interim solutions pending the availability of the Republic F-105 Thunderchief and the North American B-72 Storm. But with these experiencing prolonged delays and elements in Congress demanding rationalisation by way of the USAF joining the Navy's A-5 and A-6 programs, the USAF went looking for immediate in-house solutions.

Two such interim solutions were the F-101D and E models of McDonnell's Voodoo. These were based on McDonnell proposals intended to compete with the F-105. However, the USAF saw them as low-risk ways of producing all-weather attack combat mass whilst it waited for the Thunderchief and Storm to mature into reliable combat platforms. Both versions leveraged the work done with the NF-101A, a test-bed for the General Electric J-79 turbojet. The modification of the F-101 to accept the J-79 was straightforward and trials indicated that the engine/airframe combination was a successful one. Compared to the J-57s in production Voodoos, the shorter J-79 provided greater power at a lighter weight and reduced fuel consumption. The new engine thus offered the basis for a longer-ranged and more heavily armed generation of Voodoos. For the attack bomber role, the Voodoo's internal missile bay was replaced by a fuel tank or a cannon installation, of which 2 types were produced: a bulged pod containing 4 20mm M39 cannon or, from 1962 (and as seen here), a cannon pack featuring a single 20mm M61A1 Vulcan. The small fuselage strakes originally added to deal with turbulence from the rotary missile platform were retained to eliminate the likelihood of gun gas ingestion by the engines. For avionics, the D and E models used a mix of existing Voodoo gear and off-the-shelf equipment from other programs, including the Autonetics NASARR F15A-41B radar and Liton L-3 INS used in the export-only F-104G. An external bomb load could be carried underwing or beneath the fuselage on multiple or triple ejector racks. Drop tanks were usually fitted under the fuselage, but could also occupy the 2 underwing hardpoints. The F-101D was a single-seat version for the day attack role, while the F-101E was a two-seat model for night attack, including Denied Area Mobile Interdiction Techniques (DAMIT) missions. Promising to be in combat service before any F-105, B-72 or F-106E (itself an interim type), 450 F-101Ds were ordered alongside 350 F-101Es.

The D and E model Voodoos entered service in early 1959, several months after the F-105B, but the latter was plagued with problems. Replacing a variety of types, the first squadrons equipped with the new Voodoos went into combat in December. At the time, F-105Bs were being held in reserve in the US due to limited capabilities, excessive maintenance demands and a high attrition rate. Only 2 squadrons would take the F-105B into action and their combat record was poor compared to the J-79 powered Voodoos. In late 1961 the F-105D was finally cleared for combat, but only after several incidents had led to grounding orders. By comparison, the McDonnell bombers had been produced on budget, delivered on time and progressed through their test and training programs on schedule. By undertaking a focused, low risk upgrade of a mature platform, the USAF had (unusually) achieved its stated goals. After being replaced in frontline units by F-105Ds, F-106Es B-72Ds, 46 Ds were converted into RC-101D reconnaissance aircraft and 60 Es were modified into EF-101E electronic warfare platforms. Equipped with radar homing gear, the latter saw action in the Wild Weasel role, using jamming technology, CBUs and AGM-45A Shrikes to engage Red radars. The last RF-101D last retired in by the USAF in 1969 and the final EF-101Es lingered on with the USAF Reserve as EW aggressors until 1980.

South Africa was the only export customer for the F-101E. 45 were delivered to equip 21 and 24 Squadrons for use against Red targets in the Maghreb, with a further 37 delivered as attrition replacements between 1962 and 64. From 1962, all were equipped with the Buttermilk One radar warning system and associated Amasi One internal ECM, both made by the Johannesburg-based electronics company, Airborn. The forward antenna and associated black boxes for these displaced the nose-mounted refueling probe, which was replaced with a retractable unit attached to the port side of the forward fuselage. Armed with M117 and Mk.82 bombs and a variety of cluster munitions, they saw action against the Reds in North Africa during 1961, 62 and 63. By the end of 1963, the growing number of newly independent black majority governments in Africa had made it politically difficult for the armed forces of South Africa's Apartheid regime to operate under UN authority throughout much of the continent. From 1964, the SAAF was confined to deployments in support of white minority governments like those in Rhodesia and the Free Portuguese and Free Spanish colonies. The SAAF Voodoos continued to see action against black independence forces
through the auspices of the Salisbury Alliance until the Azanian Revolution of 1967. Signed in 1962, the Salisbury Alliance provided a framework for cooperation in the fields of defence, economics and diplomacy by the governments of the Free Portuguese Empire, the Free Spanish Empire, Rhodesia and South Africa.

In June 1966, the Free Portuguese Empire launched Operation Gordian Knot. A 7 month campaign against the Mozambique Liberation Army (MLA), it targeted bases and training camps in the liberated zones of northern Mozambique and attempted to close the Tanzanian border crossings used by the insurgents. As the Free Portuguese forces were too few in number to execute the Operation themselves, Rhodesian and South African air and ground assets fought alongside the colonial troops. Using guerrilla tactics, the MLA drew their enemies into a quagmire of hit-and-run ambushes, minefields, sporadic mortar attacks, sniper fire and IEDs. Choosing when to fight and when to withdraw, the MLA opened new fronts further south and often retreated across the border into Tanzanian sanctuaries. The latter tactic brought pressure to conduct attacks against the MLA's Tanzanian bases. This brought to the fore a major rift within the UN. The UN Secretary General was calling for a peaceful decolonisation process in Mozambique and many of its African members supported the conservative MIM and MLA as counters to the growing Mozambican Marxist threat. By contrast, the signatories to the Salisbury Alliance (also members of the UN) had no intention of giving up their power. A major miscalculation was in the offing.

Believing that the Tanzanian government would not intervene, on 13 October 1966, the Salisbury Alliance mounted Operation About Time against MLA sanctuaries in Tanzania. Planned so as to inflict maximum casualties, About Time sought to engage major MLA bases in Tanzania through a combined arms operation planned to last 5 days. It involved an intensive bombing campaign supported by ground troops whose job it was to seal off escape routes and call in artillery and air strikes. The conduct of the F-101E equipped 7 and 24 Squadrons SAAF were critical to the plan, providing a heavy day and night strike capability against enemy bases and troop concentrations. To execute their targets, the Voodoo crews strafed and delivered bombs, napalm and cluster munitions against MLA positions. Other aircraft involved in About Time included Free Portuguese and Rhodesian GAF-built Canberra bombers, Free Portuguese, Rhodesian and South African F-104G Starfighters (built by Koolhoven in SouthAfrica), SAAF Sparrowhawks (the combat version of the Atlas Hawk jet trainer), plus an assortment of airborne FACs, helicopters and transports.

About Time was launched to coincide with anniversary celebrations that commemorated the foundation of the MLA. Throughout the day on 13 October, the MLA held a series of parades, speeches, meetings and live fire drills at their bases in Tanzania. That night, at its 3 main Tanzanian bases, music concerts were held and these were targeted by the Voodoo crews of 24 Sqn SAAF to open the offensive. Coming in low and fast, the F-101Es each dropped 8 CBU-49s and strafed with their 20mm Vulcan cannon. No resistance was met and the casualties were over 1,000, including Tanzanian civilians, politicians and military personnel.

Not surprisingly, the remainder of About Time was characterised by vigorous Tanzanian resistance. Tanzanian Air Force (TAF) F-86F Sabres and Mirage 5Ts contested the foreign incursions, resulting in several dog fights. A TAF Sabre was shot down by a Portuguese Koolhoven made F-104G Starfighter, and a Free Portuguese Canberra and a SAAF F-104G were shot down by Tanzanian Mirage pilots. Notably, the Tanzanian air defenders had the advantage of being assisted in their operations by Royal Australian Navy (RAN) airpower from HMAS Brisbane, which was off the east African coast at the time. RAN fighter controllers in E-2A Hawkeyes (escorted by F-8E Crusaders) tracked adversary aircraft and directed TAF fighters into intercept positions. Ironically, the RAN was in the area following exercises with the Salisbury Alliance and were thus able to use their knowledge of adversary tactics to help the Tanzanians. Forced to fight the UN-backed Tanzanian armed forces, About Time's schedule was derailed, its scope contracted, most of its objectives unmet and the Salisbury Alliance experienced higher casualty numbers than anticipated.

The aftermath of Operation About Time was devastating for the Salisbury Alliance. Appalled by the severity of the attacks, the UN imposed sanctions on the Free Portuguese Empire, Rhodesia and South Africa, the latter government falling to the Anzanian Revolution in 1967. White control over Rhodesia would last until 1974, out of which the Zimbabwe would form, but only after a 2 year armed struggle between UN-backed and Anzanian-backed guerillas saw the latter victorious. The Free Portuguese Empire officially lost control over Mozambique in 1975, but by then authority in the colony was fragmented between the UN, the MLA or Anzanian-backed Reds. The latter would take over the country in 1978, overseas UN forces having withdrawn in 1977.

This F-101E Voodoo of 24 Squadron SAAF is modeled as photographed on 13 October 1966, the opening night of Operation About Time. It is armed with 8 SUU-30 cluster bomb dispensers, plus 2 AIM-9B Sidewinders for self defence. It wears the camouflage of dark brown and tan adopted by the SAAF Voodoos in 1964. This scheme reflected the change from exclusively night combat missions against the Reds in the Maghreb to both night and day COIN missions in southern Africa. However, in October 1966, many of their MERs, TERs and Sidewinder launch shoes were still painted black, as per the previous camouflage. The yellow low-voltage formation lights were a recent addition to the aircraft. Pooling their aircraft, 21 Sqn specialised in daylight missions (and OCU duties), with 24 Sqn focused on nocturnal flying. The Voodoo force was grounded following the Anzanian Revolution and the aircraft scrapped in the early 1970s.

Kommandant Stephen Fry (pilot) and Luitenant Jan Hendrik de Beer (navigator) were the crew of 604 on the night of 13 October 1966. Attacking an area target and not expecting any surface-to-air resistance, 604 was armed with 8 CBU-49s (SUU-30 dispensers with BLU-59 bomblets). A pair of AIM-9Bs were carried for self-defence, but the TAF was caught napping and no contacts were made with Tanzanian fighters. Both Fry and de Beer would leave South Africa as the Apartheid government fell, de Beer ultimately moving to Australia. Fry joined the Free Spanish Empire Air Force as a civilian advisor.
 
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Comrade Harps Socialist special:
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Atlantic darkness: MTR - JNQ and Skyknight FGA.1​

Description
Link: www.whatifmodellers.com/index.…

Left: Union Defence Cooperative MTR - JNQ Fizzer P, Black 32, Comrade Badowski Regiment, Polish International Air Force, Stornoway, Isle of Lewis, Socialist Republic of Scotland, 3 Jan 1954
Right: Douglas Skynight FGA.1, "W" 3 Sqdn Royal Air Force, RAF Sumburgh, Shetland Islands, United Kngdom, 3 Jan 1954

Scenario
When Red revolution swept through Britian in May 1950, Royalist forces and their American allies retreated north, finally holing up in Northern Ireland to the west and the Orkney and Shetland Islands in the north east. At the end of long and fragile supply lines and constantly under attack from the mainland (and, in the case of North Ireland, the Socialist Union backed insurgency of the Irish Republican Army), the United Nations held on to these outposts until the mid 1960s.

MTR - JNQ Fizzer P Black 32
Although it was never decorated with kill symbols, Black 32 was the personal mount of a killer team. Together, Combat Pilot Mateusz Gucman and Naviagtor Dominik Zycki were credited with 57 air to air victories, 46 of which were achieved in this plane. Most of these kills (31) were against transport aircraft supplying Northern Ireland, but the total also included fighters (9), bombers (12) and maritime patrol aicraft (5). They were credited with another 16 probable kills.

On the night of the 3/4 January, 1954, the pair were credited with shooting down a Douglas C-124C Globemaster II, their 9th confirmed kill.

Skyknight FGA.1 "W"
Seen here when credited with 5 probable and 4 confirmed kills, this was the personal mount of pilot Squadron Leader Ben Ainslie and radar operator/navigator Flight Lieutenant Mark Cavendish. Together, they would go on to be credited with 56 confirmed kills, including 23 bombers (mostly Beagles and Beavers - the Red version of the Canberra), 18 fighters (mostly Fizzers), 9 martime patrol aircraft, 3 transports and 3 Firefly harrasment attckers. Another 17 kills were list as probables.

On the night of the 3/4 January, 1954, the pair were credited with the shooting down of a Beaver that was attacking UN ships in Scapa Flow.

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Red Swordfish​

Description
Link: www.whatifmodellers.com/index.…

Fairey Swordfish Mk.1
Red 2, 239 Espadrille, Socialist Union Air Force (SUAF)
Kharkov area, summer 1943

During the course of WW2, 350 Fairey Swordfish Mk.Is were supplied to the Socialist Union. 250 went to the Red Navy and 100 to the SUAF, although in practice many of the Navy aircraft were transferred to the SUAF. Both services chiefly used the type as night bombers, the 239 Esc. being one of the SUAF's main users of the type for night harassment work.

Night harassment bombing became common during the Red Civil War of the 1920s. By the mid-1930s a formal night harassment doctrine had been formulated, with several professional and militia units dedicated to role. When the Red Navy adopted the British Swordfish torpedo bomber in late 1941 the SUAF also tested the type, finding it suitable for night harassment duties. 239 Espadrille converted from the Po-2 to the Swordfish during the winter of 1942-43 and continued with the type until the summer of 1945.

Red 2 is depicted here as photographed “near Kharkov” in the summer of 1943. It is armed with 4 FAB-100 bombs, of two different (unidentified) versions. There were over 20 versions of the FAB-100 built during the War Against Fascism and it wasn't unusual for the night bombers to fly with different types at once. Indeed, this was part of the night harassment doctrine, which emphasised both a small logistical footprint (which effectively meant that crews often had to scrounge for ordnance) anda diversity of effects. The inner weapons are RRAB-250 series cluster bombs, which were usually filled with combinations of HE, frag and incendiary bomblets equipped with a variety of impact and short- and long- time delay fuses (including delay fuses that were enhanced with anti-handling devices). This diversity was critical to the harassment doctrine, which emphasised the psychological impact of uncertainty.

The Reds used the Swordfish to make small nocturnal attacks against rear area targets such as troop concentrations, ports, rail yards and major road junctions. Flying alone or in flights of 2 or 3 aircraft (which sometimes included a pair of P0-2 from other units), the Swordfish crews maintained a sustained nuisance presence over selected German occupied areas, making repeated attacks over a number of hours to deny sleep and engender degenerative stress. Material damage was of secondary importance.

The camouflage seen on most SUAF Swordfish features an unusually high-contrast scheme on the upper surfaces. There has been much controversy about the colours used, partly due to the lack of colour photos of the aircraft in Red service and the fact that aircraft were sometimes repainted from their factory finish. This Swordfish wears the standard SUAF Noc on the under and side surfaces with the uppers being covered in a disruptive pattern of Black Green and Bright Green. Whilst this may seem adverse to its nocturnal role, it was a common finish on the understanding that the biplane layout created large shadows and that contrast was needed to break-up the plane's shape.

defiantski_by_sport16ing_db6ty75-414w-2x.jpg

Defiantski​

Description
Link: www.whatifmodellers.com/index.…

British development
The Boulton Paul Defiant was built to Air Ministry Specification F.9/35, which called for a two-seat turret equipped fighter-bomber. Although initially built as a pure fighter with all its guns in the turret, the second prototype had provision for underwing bomb shackles and later tested twelve forward firing .303 machine guns in the wings. Because the emphasis was on air defence, plans for a fighter-bomber Defiant were placed on hold and not revisited until mid-1941, when a MkII was modified with two forward firing 20mm Hispano cannon and bomb racks. Proposals for single or two seat versions with four 20mm Hispano cannons (but without underwing handpoints) were rejected.

The RAF showed little interest in the any of these types, but following the June 1941 Nazi invasion of the Socialist Union the Air Ministry ordered the last 200 Defiants to be built as fighter-bomber MkIVs with two Hispano cannon, turret and bomb racks for immediate export. In fact, most of these aircraft had already been laid down as turretless TT MkIII target tugs and were thus delivered without rear defences.

In Red service
The first arrived by ship in November 1941 and, after brief combat with the 4th Ground Attack Regiment - also equipped with the ILT-OO Shturmovik – the Defiants were recalled from action and re-tasked with training duties, most going to gunnery training units. Around thirty were subsequently modified to take indigenous turrets and twenty of these were assigned to the Northern Fleet for patrol and convoy escort work between the Allied occupied Svalbard islands off the coast of Norway and Murmansk.

To cope with the Arctic conditions in this region, several were equipped with fixed skis attached to their bomb pylons, the undercarriage being removed to make way for extra fuel. Popularly known as the Defiantski, they remained in service with the Northern Fleet’s 73rd Independent Air Squadron until mid-1944, when replaced by ski-equipped ILT-WOs. In that time, the type was credited with the sinking of two German vessels and shooting down a Blohm und Voss 138.

However, the type’s biggest claim to fame came after the war when UFO enthusiasts noted a Radio Moscow broadcast from 17 March, 1944. In an interview with British Aeronautical engineer Roy Fedden in the 24 March 1950 Daily Mirror newspaper, Fadden made claims that the Nazis had built UFOs or Foo Fighters during the war and had test flown them from a base high in the Arctic ice cap. As evidence of this, he cited Radio Moscow’s claim that a ski-equipped airborne task force from the Northern Fleet had captured a Nazi freighter above Svalbard in the Arctic Circle. After fleeing Britain’s Red revolution of May 1950 and settling in the USA, Fadden sated in his 1955 book Nazi Discs, Red Ice that he believed the aircraft involved included Defiantskis. This Defiant connection has since become accepted folklore of the Nazi/Red UFO conspiracy theory.
 
Kymrian Flying Host - Flying boats and seaplanes

Almost have these ready. Stay patient, I'll post them soon.
 
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Sparrow Avengers timeline - Aero A-425 "Hawk" canard-pusher biplane figher (late 1920s - 1940s) of the Zemplín Federation (1930s)

Aero Jastrab (Hawk) Zemplín Federation.png


Aero Jastrab (Hawk) Zemplín Federation (roundel variant).png


Some of you might know of my 19th and especially 20th century timeline, which I refer to as the Sparrow Avengers universe.

Some of you might remember the ATL aircraft from that setting, which I co-developed with @cortz#9 years ago, and posted in this thread not that long ago (last year).

Including the Aero A-425 Jestřáb, developed by Aero Vodochody in the Czech-Moravian-Silesian Republic in the late 1920s and exported or license-built in a number of countries, including many of the Slovak-speaking successor statelets to Austria-Hungary (where it was known as the Jastrab or Héja).

Well, here are two specimens of the A-425 "Hawk" from the Zemplín Federation, one of the east Slovak successor statelets.

The more detailed air force roundel variant is actually used left often (most commonly on airships), but can sometimes be seen on aeroplanes as well. The colours-only version of the Zemplín air force roundel is the standard version of the roundel, always used on plane tail rudders.

You don't know much about the interwar military of the interwar Zemplín Federation ? Be my guest, read these notes on its military.

(Not 100 % complete yet, I still need to improve a few details.)
 
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Sparrow Avengers universe - Aero A-425 "Hawk" biplane pusher figher (late 1920s - 1940s) of the Zemplín Federation (1930s)

View attachment 851378

View attachment 851377


Some of you might know of my 19th and especially 20th century timeline, which I refer to as the Sparrow Avengers universe.

Some of you might remember the ATL aircraft from that setting, which I co-developed with @cortz#9 years ago, and posted in this thread not that long ago (last year).

Including the Aero A-425 Jestřáb, developed in the Czech-Moravian-Silesian Republic in the late 1920s and exported or license-built in a number of countries, including many of the Slovak-speaking successor statelets to Austria-Hungary (where it was known as the Jastrab).

Well, here are two specimens of the A-425 "Hawk" from the Zemplín Federation, one of the east Slovak successor statelets.

The more detailed air force roundel variant is actually used left often (most commonly on airships), but can sometimes be seen on aeroplanes as well. The colours-only version of the Zemplín air force roundel is the standard version of the roundel, always used on plane tail rudders.

You don't know much about the interwar military of the interwar Zemplín Federation ? Be my guest, read these notes on its military.

(Not 100 % complete yet, I still need to improve a few details.)
I always liked this design but felt the wings needed to be further apart, couldn't find a satisfactory way to that though.
 
I always liked this design but felt the wings needed to be further apart, couldn't find a satisfactory way to that though.
I know. You yourself said you might rework the design in the future, but we never got to it.

I already like it as it is, though I had a bit of an issue guessing the curvature of the lower wing.
 
I always liked this design but felt the wings needed to be further apart, couldn't find a satisfactory way to that though.
I know. You yourself said you might rework the design in the future, but we never got to it.

I already like it as it is, though I had a bit of an issue guessing the curvature of the lower wing.

Had two designs in my CSU; The "classic"*, and a more "modern" version specifically for Zeppelin use which had shorter wings connected by strut/stabilizer kind of like a box wing.

*Though one of my friends who played the miniatures game with more aerodynamic experience than me commented that he also felt the wings were too close together. He like the box-wing idea but suggested they'd likely either have the bottom wing 'inverted gull wing' (aka Corsair) or possibly both with the upper a standard gull-wing. I adopted the latter idea for the box-wing zeppelin defense fighter :)

Randy
 
Had two designs in my CSU; The "classic"*, and a more "modern" version specifically for Zeppelin use which had shorter wings connected by strut/stabilizer kind of like a box wing.

*Though one of my friends who played the miniatures game with more aerodynamic experience than me commented that he also felt the wings were too close together. He like the box-wing idea but suggested they'd likely either have the bottom wing 'inverted gull wing' (aka Corsair) or possibly both with the upper a standard gull-wing. I adopted the latter idea for the box-wing zeppelin defense fighter :)

Randy
Gull wings! That's brilliant, wish I had thought of that.
Going to give that shot. :)
 
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