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In 1944 the Icelandic Althing dissolve the union between Iceland and Denmark and declared itself a republic. What is the Fareo islands followed suit and declared itself an independant republic.

In such a scenario how would the Fareoese declaration be met by the international community?

How would independance affect the development of the Faroese society post WW2?

One important change in this ATL(alternate time line) is that it won't be as easy to emigrate from the Faroe islands. This will lead to the islands having a higher population.

Something to look into:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faroe_Islands
https://visitfaroeislands.com
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faroese_independence_movement
https://www.economist.com/news/euro...h-why-faroe-islands-want-independence-denmark
https://www.politico.eu/article/faroe-islands-to-vote-on-constitution-paving-way-for-independence/
https://www.faroeislands.fo/the-big-picture/news/faroese-economy-more-independent-than-ever/
http://www.government.fo/en/foreign-relations/the-political-and-legal-status-of-the-faroe-islands/
https://sputniknews.com/europe/201702151050697854-faroe-islands-independece-denmark/
http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0010836713514150?journalCode=caca
 
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First of all let's discuss why the Danish government decided to not recognise the referendum in 1946.

First it had a low turnout[1]. Next the yes to independence won by 166 votes[2], which was a plurality of the vote and not a majority. This very small plurality meant the Danish government didn't find the referendum legitimate. Iceland also had a right to dissolve the union while Faroe[3] didn't.

But let's imagine the Faroese was able to drum up greater support, so the Danish government recognise Faroese independence. If the Faroese can get a absolute majority of the electorate Denmark would likely have decided to recognise their independence. It would in general have been recognised around the world afterward.

The island have roughly 30.000 people in 1945 and the population have grown to roughly 50.000 people today. But beside that 30.000 people born on the Faroe lives in Denmark. Beside that let's be inspired by Iceland.

Iceland had Danish as first foreign language until 1999, after which it became second foreign language afterward, you can choose to learn another East Scandinavian language, but in practice people learn Danish. Because of the low Icelandic population, a lot Icelander take their education in the rest of Scandinavia, historical Denmark was the main place to study abroad and the Icelanders got special right to study there even after the union was dissolved, but today Norway have as many Icelanders as Denmark, while Sweden have a few less. The main differences between Icelanders and Faroese are that Faroe had a less developed education sector in 1944, they had less pride about their language[4], they was also far more religious and traditional. Denmark also together with USA take care of a lot of Icelandic national security. A important factor is that Reykjavik have grown since independence to have around half the population of Iceland.

So what do I think will happens? Could Faroe survive as a independent state; yes it could, but it would be far poorer.

But here we run inmto the problems Faroe need to industrialise and build up a education sector. Faroese will likely keep their favoured access to education in Denmark, so they need to send people abroad to get education. I think this will work to weaken the position of the Faroese language. In fact I think the greater (relative) poverty of the Faroese, will work to the education sector being behind OTL, and having a far greater use of Danish. We will likely see Thorshavns to large extent being Danish speaking[5].

The industrialisation will mostly build on fish, fish and fish. We may see some diversification, I could see a few shipyards being very important for the economy. We will likely also see a greater diversification of the economy to ensure a BOP surplus. But these will likely be mostly for domestic use. We will likely see forest plantage to ensure a domestic supply of timber, we will see some of the coal mines being kept open, we may see growth house growing vegetable.

Population-wise I expect the islands to have 100.000 people by modern day, most of the population increase will be in Thorshavn, which would be home to half the islands population, they will likely have a GDP per capita (nominal) around 40.000$, not bad but far lower than modern day Faroe. I could see up to a third of the population being L1 Danish speakers. It will mean that Danish are first foreign language, but we would likely see something of a Kulturkampf in modern Faroe to limit the position of Danish, with people pushing for English to replace Danish as first foreign language and pushing for greater use of Faroese in tertiary education. The Danish speakers will likely see themselves much like Swedish speakers in Finland does.

Foreign policy; Faroe won't have a army or navy leaving that to Denmark, it will be a NATO member later it will become part of EFTA, but it won't join EU out of fear of its fishing rights. It will of course be a member of the Nordic Council. The large number of Danish speakers (Thorshavn beating Flensburg as city with most Danish speakers abroad) will likely mean Denmark have a special relationship with Faroe.


[1]67,5% compared to the Icelandic 98,4%

[2]48,7% vote for independence on Faroe compared to 99,5% on Iceland.

[3]the reason I call it Faroe instead of Faroe Island are because "oe" means island(s). So I will never call them "Sheep Islands Islands".

[4]It should be said this is common, no one love their language as much as the Icelanders, not even the French. Danish was in general used as the language of public media until the 80ties.

[5]Likely using Gøtadanskt/Gøta ("Street Danish" in Faroese), a local variant of Danish used by Faroese speakers, Danish are also today spoken as first language by 5% of all school children and a unknown number of adults. Example
 
I'm not sure that independence would see Faroese would make less progress.

Is your assumption that the Faroese who would have emigrated in OTL to Denmark and become people whose main language is Danish would, in this ATL, become people who stay in the Faroes and would shift to Danish regardless?
 
I'm not sure that independence would see Faroese would make less progress.

Is your assumption that the Faroese who would have emigrated in OTL to Denmark and become people whose main language is Danish would, in this ATL, become people who stay in the Faroes and would shift to Danish regardless?

I would expect the people migrating to Denmark, would to large extent stay/return to Faroe, but the limited shift to Danish would not be caused by that, but by the fact that there would be greater need for Danish in education. We saw something similar in Greenland, where many Greenlanders became monolingual Danish speakers so their children would do better in the education system. This was caused by the Greenlandic industrialization was much more radical than in Faroe, because the traditional Faroese way of life was much more viable than the Inuit one. So Faroe had a far less radical industrialization. But here they would need to do many of the same things as the Greenlanders did, as they wouldn't receive direct economic support from Denmark and the Danes would still offer free education in Denmark. Which would likely result in some of the population pushing a greater use of Danish. You have seen something similar in other post-colonial societies, French as example are far more widespread as L1 in many of their former colonies today, than under colonialism.
 
I would expect the people migrating to Denmark, would to large extent stay/return to Faroe, but the limited shift to Danish would not be caused by that, but by the fact that there would be greater need for Danish in education. We saw something similar in Greenland, where many Greenlanders became monolingual Danish speakers so their children would do better in the education system. This was caused by the Greenlandic industrialization was much more radical than in Faroe, because the traditional Faroese way of life was much more viable than the Inuit one. So Faroe had a far less radical industrialization. But here they would need to do many of the same things as the Greenlanders did, as they wouldn't receive direct economic support from Denmark and the Danes would still offer free education in Denmark. Which would likely result in some of the population pushing a greater use of Danish. You have seen something similar in other post-colonial societies, French as example are far more widespread as L1 in many of their former colonies today, than under colonialism.

But in post-colonial societies like most of Francophone Africa, French has been able to retain a prominent status at least in part because it is a prestigious an relatively ethnically neutral language. In particularly multiethnic countries like Côte d'Ivoire or Congo, French is the only viable choice as a national language, even ignoring continuing ties to France and the rest of Francophone Africa.

There's also the interesting case of Angola, where in the decades after independence a disruptive civil war combined with education systems which did not make use of native languages to produce a decided shift to Portuguese as the main language of younger generations.

It does not seem to me that these factors are going to operate in the case of the independent Faroes. We're not speaking about a Danish minority, but rather about a minority of Faroese who would have gone to Denmark in OTL. These people might be more inclined to speak Danish if they stayed in the Faroes, but they will be in a wholly different environment, not just living in the same space as their colinguals and coethnics but living in an independent country that--I would think--is not going to adopt substantially different policies towards language than the Dnaish autonomous region of OTL.

It's worth noting, incidentally, that the Danicization of Greenland seems to be perhaps overestimated. One recent study of language usage in schools in the capital of Nuuk finds a high rate of Greenlandic use. The contrast with Inuktitut in Iqaluit, in Canada, is noteworthy.

http://www3.brandonu.ca/cjns/21.2/cjnsv21no2_pg235-274.pdf
 
The island have roughly 30.000 people in 1945 and the population have grown to roughly 50.000 people today. But beside that 30.000 people born on the Faroe lives in Denmark. Beside that let's be inspired by Iceland.
The Fareo population have had a high birth rate by european standards, do you think a independant Fareo would keep a similar birth rate as OTL? Maybe one reason that the Fareo islands have had a high TFR is that many of the more secular people more presidposed to lower birth rates have migrated to Denmark proper?
Iceland had Danish as first foreign language until 1999, after which it became second foreign language afterward, you can choose to learn another East Scandinavian language, but in practice people learn Danish. Because of the low Icelandic population, a lot Icelander take their education in the rest of Scandinavia, historical Denmark was the main place to study abroad and the Icelanders got special right to study there even after the union was dissolved, but today Norway have as many Icelanders as Denmark, while Sweden have a few less. The main differences between Icelanders and Faroese are that Faroe had a less developed education sector in 1944, they had less pride about their language[4], they was also far more religious and traditional. Denmark also together with USA take care of a lot of Icelandic national security. A important factor is that Reykjavik have grown since independence to have around half the population of Iceland.
I know that the Fareoese language is mor similar to continental north-Germanic than Icelandic. Is this connected to what you said about the educational sector and pride in language, or is it more ancient?

How are the Fareoese more religious and traditional? Would a ATL independant Faero be more likely to be more or less religious and traditional than OTL?

Maybe the Fareo islands would see greater urbanisation, maybe combined with a larger collection of vilages? Would urbanisation lower birth rates?
So what do I think will happens? Could Faroe survive as a independent state; yes it could, but it would be far poorer.
Maybe, but a independant Fareo republic would probably have less emigration and therefore retain more highly educated people, people who are likely to earn more than less educated people.
But here we run inmto the problems Faroe need to industrialise and build up a education sector. Faroese will likely keep their favoured access to education in Denmark, so they need to send people abroad to get education. I think this will work to weaken the position of the Faroese language. In fact I think the greater (relative) poverty of the Faroese, will work to the education sector being behind OTL, and having a far greater use of Danish. We will likely see Thorshavns to large extent being Danish speaking[5].
I think that the Fareoese langague would have been strengthened by independace.
Foreign policy; Faroe won't have a army or navy leaving that to Denmark, it will be a NATO member later it will become part of EFTA, but it won't join EU out of fear of its fishing rights. It will of course be a member of the Nordic Council. The large number of Danish speakers (Thorshavn beating Flensburg as city with most Danish speakers abroad) will likely mean Denmark have a special relationship with Faroe.
I agree, this seems likely
[3]the reason I call it Faroe instead of Faroe Island are because "oe" means island(s). So I will never call them "Sheep Islands Islands".
It makes it easier for non-scandinavians to read if we use fareo islands.
 
The Fareo population have had a high birth rate by european standards, do you think a independant Fareo would keep a similar birth rate as OTL? Maybe one reason that the Fareo islands have had a high TFR is that many of the more secular people more presidposed to lower birth rates have migrated to Denmark proper?

I know that the Fareoese language is mor similar to continental north-Germanic than Icelandic. Is this connected to what you said about the educational sector and pride in language, or is it more ancient?

How are the Fareoese more religious and traditional? Would a ATL independant Faero be more likely to be more or less religious and traditional than OTL?

Maybe the Fareo islands would see greater urbanisation, maybe combined with a larger collection of vilages? Would urbanisation lower birth rates?

Tórshavn and its neighbouring communities have 40% of the population of the Faroes, a proportion not that far from the two-thirds of he Icelandic population living in Reykjavik. We can only speculate about how this distribution would change, though I would think greater urbanization and concentration around the capital is at least plausible.
 
Tórshavn and its neighbouring communities have 40% of the population of the Faroes, a proportion not that far from the two-thirds of he Icelandic population living in Reykjavik. We can only speculate about how this distribution would change, though I would think greater urbanization and concentration around the capital is at least plausible.
One of the challanges to urbanisation is the availibility of land. The Faroes are group of mountianous islands. It is more expensive and difficult to build in rugged terrain.

Here is a link to google maps of OTL Torshavn.
https://www.google.no/maps/@61.9993927,-6.8009853,13115m/data=!3m1!1e3
 
One of the challanges to urbanisation is the availibility of land. The Faroes are group of mountianous islands. It is more expensive and difficult to build in rugged terrain.

Here is a link to google maps of OTL Torshavn.
https://www.google.no/maps/@61.9993927,-6.8009853,13115m/data=!3m1!1e3

The main trend in post-1945 Faroes has been for the concentration of population away from peripheral islands and communities and into larger ones. This is how Tórshavn became such a relatively dominant metropolis. I see no reason for this to change, even with a larger population.
 
The main trend in post-1945 Faroes has been for the concentration of population away from peripheral islands and communities and into larger ones. This is how Tórshavn became such a relatively dominant metropolis. I see no reason for this to change, even with a larger population.
But there must be a ceiling to how much urban sprawl Torshavn can have. Sometime it might push property prices up. While developers might build apartment blocks instead of houses. This would lead to higher prices per square meter for residents. I think that this therefore might lead to lower fertility rates. But you are right that urbanisation would likely remain a trend in ATL as in OTL.
 
Even if there is no space for growth in Tórshavn, there can be growth in secondary communities depending on how the Faroese economy develops.

Who is to say that there might not be Faroese immigration anyway? An independent Faroes is likely to participate as an actor in various Nordic integration initiatives after the Second World War, including the unified labour market. Why mightn't there be Faroese immigrants in Scandinavia more generally?
 
But in post-colonial societies like most of Francophone Africa, French has been able to retain a prominent status at least in part because it is a prestigious an relatively ethnically neutral language. In particularly multiethnic countries like Côte d'Ivoire or Congo, French is the only viable choice as a national language, even ignoring continuing ties to France and the rest of Francophone Africa.

There's also the interesting case of Angola, where in the decades after independence a disruptive civil war combined with education systems which did not make use of native languages to produce a decided shift to Portuguese as the main language of younger generations.

It does not seem to me that these factors are going to operate in the case of the independent Faroes. We're not speaking about a Danish minority, but rather about a minority of Faroese who would have gone to Denmark in OTL. These people might be more inclined to speak Danish if they stayed in the Faroes, but they will be in a wholly different environment, not just living in the same space as their colinguals and coethnics but living in an independent country that--I would think--is not going to adopt substantially different policies towards language than the Dnaish autonomous region of OTL.

The difference in OTL was that the Faroese nation building in OTL have been mostly cultural, here it will be economic instead as they don't get money from Denmark, and even in OTL Danish was language of media and advertising up to the 80ties. Faroese are a small language and was smaller in the past. Which means almost all specialise education will be to expensive to print in Faroese. This means the Faroese education system will be geared to produce two kind of people, unskilled workers with a primary education in Faroese and skilled workers those education will be in Danish. This isn' just white collar workers, it will also be skilled blue collar workers, where a lot of instruction will be in Danish or other East Scandinavian language. Of course I doubt the "Danish" speakers will give up Faroese, but we likely see this population being fully bilingual. The effect is only strengthen because the Faroese grammar and basic vocabulary are the same as in Danish (I can mostly read Faroese)

It's worth noting, incidentally, that the Danicization of Greenland seems to be perhaps overestimated. One recent study of language usage in schools in the capital of Nuuk finds a high rate of Greenlandic use. The contrast with Inuktitut in Iqaluit, in Canada, is noteworthy.

http://www3.brandonu.ca/cjns/21.2/cjnsv21no2_pg235-274.pdf

It's a very interesting report, but it doesn't say anything greater about the Greenlandic society, it just tell us that primary Greenlandic speakers use their own language in society and the primarily Danish and Greenland speakers rarely interact. The Danish/Greenlandic state doesn't really report on how many L1 speakers of the different languages there's on Greenland, the best we have are guesses based on where people live and where they originate from, but A Danish speaker born on Greenland will be counted as Inuit in the unofficial statistic. Atassut and Demokraatit are in general the "Danish" parties with Siumut being popular among Danish immigrants and expats on Greenland. Based on what I have could find, a good guess would be the L1 Danish population on Greenland are something like 20-25% with around 12-13% being monolingual (In the context Greenlandic/Danish most of them speak English, while French and German also being commonly spoken by them) with the rest being "bilingual"[1]. Intersting the spread of Danish came in the 70ties and continued into the early 90ties and was based on domestic politics and as part of the Greenlandic nation building project, where Danish was seen as necessary to develop Greenland. The Danish state have never really had any great interest in forcing the Greenlanders to speak Danish. Interesting the Faroese and Norwegian are pretty much the only groups in the former Danish "empire", where Danish was forced down over them, but that was because they was seen as Danish dialects[2]. Icelandic was also seen as a Danish dialect, but it was seen as original Danish and for that reason the Danish state worked to keep it pure[3].

[1]The bilingualism of this group are likely overrated, any Danish speakers who master Greenlandic to some degree would likely call themselves bilingual in this context.

[2]It's also not entirely incorrect, the South Jutish dialect as example are less related to standard Danish than Faroese and the Norwegian dialects were. It's also why I see a accidental shift, where some family use it at home together with Faroese.

[3]Which explain some of the modern attitude the Icelanders have to their language.
 
Even if there is no space for growth in Tórshavn, there can be growth in secondary communities depending on how the Faroese economy develops.

Who is to say that there might not be Faroese immigration anyway? An independent Faroes is likely to participate as an actor in various Nordic integration initiatives after the Second World War, including the unified labour market. Why mightn't there be Faroese immigrants in Scandinavia more generally?

There will be, if we ran with the Faroese birth rate and no emigration, we would likely talk about 150.000 people. The 30.000 Faroese in Denmark are only people born in the Faroese and not their children.
 
The Fareo population have had a high birth rate by european standards, do you think a independant Fareo would keep a similar birth rate as OTL? Maybe one reason that the Fareo islands have had a high TFR is that many of the more secular people more presidposed to lower birth rates have migrated to Denmark proper?

To some degree, but these would end up in Thorshavn instead, but the Faroese in Denmark doesn't have a low birth rate, they just have one lower thanon Faroe.
I know that the Fareoese language is mor similar to continental north-Germanic than Icelandic. Is this connected to what you said about the educational sector and pride in language, or is it more ancient?

It's a result of the Icelanders havingtheir own Bible, and the Faroese using the Danish one until the 19th century. Honestly it's closest related to Nynorsk, it just use the Icelandic alphabet instead of the Danish/Norwegian one.

How are the Fareoese more religious and traditional? Would a ATL independant Faero be more likely to be more or less religious and traditional than OTL?

Likely moreso, because it would be poorer

Maybe the Fareo islands would see greater urbanisation, maybe combined with a larger collection of vilages? Would urbanisation lower birth rates?

Yes, but it would still stay high.
Maybe, but a independant Fareo republic would probably have less emigration and therefore retain more highly educated people, people who are likely to earn more than less educated people.

I think that the Fareoese langague would have been strengthened by independace.

see post 13
 
The difference in OTL was that the Faroese nation building in OTL have been mostly cultural, here it will be economic instead as they don't get money from Denmark, and even in OTL Danish was language of media and advertising up to the 80ties. Faroese are a small language and was smaller in the past. Which means almost all specialise education will be to expensive to print in Faroese. This means the Faroese education system will be geared to produce two kind of people, unskilled workers with a primary education in Faroese and skilled workers those education will be in Danish. This isn' just white collar workers, it will also be skilled blue collar workers, where a lot of instruction will be in Danish or other East Scandinavian language. Of course I doubt the "Danish" speakers will give up Faroese, but we likely see this population being fully bilingual. The effect is only strengthen because the Faroese grammar and basic vocabulary are the same as in Danish (I can mostly read Faroese)
Do you include Norwegian in your "east scandinavaian language" category?
It's a very interesting report, but it doesn't say anything greater about the Greenlandic society, it just tell us that primary Greenlandic speakers use their own language in society and the primarily Danish and Greenland speakers rarely interact. The Danish/Greenlandic state doesn't really report on how many L1 speakers of the different languages there's on Greenland, the best we have are guesses based on where people live and where they originate from, but A Danish speaker born on Greenland will be counted as Inuit in the unofficial statistic. Atassut and Demokraatit are in general the "Danish" parties with Siumut being popular among Danish immigrants and expats on Greenland. Based on what I have could find, a good guess would be the L1 Danish population on Greenland are something like 20-25% with around 12-13% being monolingual (In the context Greenlandic/Danish most of them speak English, while French and German also being commonly spoken by them) with the rest being "bilingual"[1]. Intersting the spread of Danish came in the 70ties and continued into the early 90ties and was based on domestic politics and as part of the Greenlandic nation building project, where Danish was seen as necessary to develop Greenland. The Danish state have never really had any great interest in forcing the Greenlanders to speak Danish. Interesting the Faroese and Norwegian are pretty much the only groups in the former Danish "empire", where Danish was forced down over them, but that was because they was seen as Danish dialects[2]. Icelandic was also seen as a Danish dialect, but it was seen as original Danish and for that reason the Danish state worked to keep it pure[3].
How many of the L1 Danish speakers in Greenland are ethnic Danes by number and/or percentage? How many of th Greenlandic Inuit are L1 Danish speakers? When intermarriage occurs do these unions and there offspring tend to affiliate with Danish or Inuit most? Immigrants to Greenland do they tend to choose Danish or Inuit?

In Norway we had a language conflict, still do just not as hot. In the end the Danish inspired contender Bokmål won.
 
There will be, if we ran with the Faroese birth rate and no emigration, we would likely talk about 150.000 people. The 30.000 Faroese in Denmark are only people born in the Faroese and not their children.
Intresting!

Another important thing that might or would have changed is the gender composition of the Faeros. Today there is a gender deficit in the Faeros due to women having higher emigration rates than men. This in a Western country with not sex selective norms prefering boys over girls like in China, India or Armenia. Combined with boys being around 51 of 100 births, this is generally an average for the global home sapien population, meaning that there is naturally a exess of males in a population.

Do most Faeroese emigrant emigrate as individuals, couples or families?
 
Do you include Norwegian in your "east scandinavaian language" category?

Bokmål yes, Nynorsk are technical West Scandinavian.

How many of the L1 Danish speakers in Greenland are ethnic Danes by number and/or percentage? How many of th Greenlandic Inuit are L1 Danish speakers? When intermarriage occurs do these unions and there offspring tend to affiliate with Danish or Inuit most? Immigrants to Greenland do they tend to choose Danish or Inuit?

The average Greenlander which aren't a Danish immigrant or child of one, are 1/4 European. Pretty much all Greenlanders are partly Danish. As for the children of modern intermarriage, they mostly end up monolingual Danish speaking or bilingual with Danish as main language (as Danes on Greenland rarely learn Greenlandic).
In Norway we had a language conflict, still do just not as hot. In the end the Danish inspired contender Bokmål won.

I would say that Bokmål are more than Danish inspired. It's pretty much just Rigsdansk with a Norwegian accent and a slightly alternative spelling. Denmark could pretty much adopted the written Bokmål and it would function just as well for Danish. Götadanskt are pretty much the Faroese version of Bokmål.
Intresting!

Another important thing that might or would have changed is the gender composition of the Faeros. Today there is a gender deficit in the Faeros due to women having higher emigration rates than men. This in a Western country with not sex selective norms prefering boys over girls like in China, India or Armenia. Combined with boys being around 51 of 100 births, this is generally an average for the global home sapien population, meaning that there is naturally a exess of males in a population.

Do most Faeroese emigrant emigrate as individuals, couples or families?

They mostly emigrate individually to get a education and the gender deficit are pretty similar to rural Denmark, and you also see something similar with Icelanders (and to lesser extent Norwegians and Swedes), the Icelanders also emigrate to Denmark to get a education, with women having a small surplus and more women find a husband in Denmark and stay. It's usual healthcare educations.
 
The average Greenlander which aren't a Danish immigrant or child of one, are 1/4 European. Pretty much all Greenlanders are partly Danish. As for the children of modern intermarriage, they mostly end up monolingual Danish speaking or bilingual with Danish as main language (as Danes on Greenland rarely learn Greenlandic).
Is all the European ancestry of greenlanders Danish in orgin? I once read that some of the whalers working around Greenland, would sometimes find Greenlandic spouses. The same text also claimed that little to none of the European ancestry in Greenlanders orginate in the Greenlandic Norse.

Does this Danish immigration to Greenland that we see in the dna, mean that Greenland was more integrated with Denmark than Norway, Iceland or the Faroes?
I would say that Bokmål are more than Danish inspired. It's pretty much just Rigsdansk with a Norwegian accent and a slightly alternative spelling. Denmark could pretty much adopted the written Bokmål and it would function just as well for Danish. Götadanskt are pretty much the Faroese version of Bokmål.
Bokmål is standard Danish that was developed to use Norwegian spelling for the most part.

I am not an expert on language, but Danish might have been the prestigous language in Norway for a long time. One example may be the words for "wife". The old norwegian word for wife is kjerring, which is today seen as derogotary, while the Danish import kona is more popular.
https://nn.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kjerring
https://www.riksmalsforbundet.no/qa_faqs/hva-betyr-ordet-kjerring-og-hva-kommer-det-av/

You also see more Danish influeced language in higher socio-economic classes.
They mostly emigrate individually to get a education and the gender deficit are pretty similar to rural Denmark, and you also see something similar with Icelanders (and to lesser extent Norwegians and Swedes), the Icelanders also emigrate to Denmark to get a education, with women having a small surplus and more women find a husband in Denmark and stay. It's usual healthcare educations.
Do you mean to day that immigrants to Denmark from Norway, Iceland and Sweden like Fareos have a overproportional representation of women?

All rural areas in the modern west seem to have a larger male majority. Women are more willing and/or wanting to move to more urbanised areas.
 
Even if there is no space for growth in Tórshavn, there can be growth in secondary communities depending on how the Faroese economy develops.

Who is to say that there might not be Faroese immigration anyway? An independent Faroes is likely to participate as an actor in various Nordic integration initiatives after the Second World War, including the unified labour market. Why mightn't there be Faroese immigrants in Scandinavia more generally?
There probably would be some Faroese emigration the mainland Scandinavia.
 
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