AHC: Cold War between Religious Communism and Atheist Capitalism

First thread, might as well make it personal.

I've always considered myself a Christian communist but as an American, i'm in the minority. For some reason or another Americans are literally incapable of mixing together religion and equality. Makes picking sides during political arguments fairly difficult to say the least.

My backstory aside, after 1800, how can we get a cold war between Religious communism and Atheistic capitalism? What countries would likely be the leading superpowers and how would the rivalry play out?

Bonus if we could reverse it again with democratic majority communists and totalitarian majority capitalists.
 
It would probably help to not have Karl Marx be the father of communism and instead have it be an outgrowth of Liberation Theology/other Christian or other religions’ egalitarian doctrine.
 
As for religious (specifically Christian) communism, I think that trying to create a utopia on Earth is contrary to religious teaching (that Jesus will bring the Kingdom of God after the end times), but I do not think that left wing economic and right wing social policy are incompatible or contradictory in the slightest, and I can explain my position in more detail if need be.
 
As for religious (specifically Christian) communism, I think that trying to create a utopia on Earth is contrary to religious teaching (that Jesus will bring the Kingdom of God after the end times), but I do not think that left wing economic and right wing social policy are incompatible or contradictory in the slightest, and I can explain my position in more detail if need be.
Could you?
 
Being socially conservative and being economically leftist are not mutually exclusive.

Being religious and being economically leftist are also not mutually exclusive.


How do you get atheist capitalism?

Blend classical liberalism with free thought. Marinade in essence of Adam Smith.
 
Could you?
Yes. First, while the Catholic Church doesn't primarily deal in economics, the church's economic teaching could broadly be defined as center to center-left. While the church isn't necessarily opposed to capitalism, it does view capitalism as needing limits in order for it support the common good (more can be found here). There's even an economic philosophy called Distributism that is inspired by Catholic social teaching, which seeks to find a middle ground between Lazziez-Faire Capitalism and Socialism. In the U.S., most Catholics tend to twist the Church's teaching to fit their own ideological views, with left-wing Catholics ignoring the teaching on sex and the family and right-wing Catholics ignoring the Church's preference towards a mixed economy in favor of full-on "greed is good" Reaganism. In an alternate timeline that is friendlier to this worldview (maybe a Central Powers victory in WW1 would do), I could see this type of ideology being quite successful and popular, rather than just a niche. I will concede that, economics wise, this is more Social Democracy with a Christian flare than Communism, but it's still to the economic left of most conservative Christians in the U.S.
On the more extreme end of the Economic Left/Socially Right worldview, you'd have the ideologies like National Bolshevism (or Nazbol) and Strasserism, both of which combine left-wing economics with extreme nationalism and often times jingoism and bigotry. These extremist ideologies ultimately never came to power, losing out to the standard Bolsheviks and the Hitler wing of the Nazi Party respectively, but I'm sure there's a timeline about a Nazbol Russia or Strasserist Germany somewhere on this site.
So, in an alternate world where , a major political party might espouse a viewpoint like this: "While markets and capitalism aren't bad in and of themselves, lazziez-faire capitalism leads to a materialist, consumerist culture that corrodes the family and ignores the value of a strong community and a support structure for people to fall back on in hard times. With this in mind, our party's economic platform supports a strong social safety net to support those who've fallen on hard times, combined with strong subsidies to families (I.E. married couples) in order to allow the family unit to thrive in the modern age". I know this isn't full-on Communism or even Socialism, but it's more like a socially conservative version of Sweden.
 
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Surprising, in comparison to modern stereotypes, a fair bit of Christian ideologies can be seen as socialist ideas, leading to communism.
Working to better the community rather then the individual. Charity can be seen in its most basic form as the equivalent of sharing the wealth between the community, only rather then the government doing the distribution, it is the church or community.
 
Atheist capitalism is certainly doable (technocracy, extreme meritocracy). Religious communism, as someone mentioned, requires communism to spring up from completely different roots (no Marx). Instead, well, since it would mostly hinge on "common" and "commune", maybe some fringe Christian group that believes everything should be "common" like it was for the first Christians in early Common Era... (are there any such groups? or do we have to invent one?)
 
Any ideas what two countries will be leading the two blocs, and when the two ideologies would most likely take over said countries?
Canada, Sweden and Britain seem to be parts of the world that are receptive to market economics and irreligion. Perhaps a fractured USA allowing New York/New England as independent countries.

As for religious communism, why not Russia? Or China? North Korea seems a good example.
 
Religious communism certainly seems easier. Perhaps even one based on OTL Marx can be radically reinterpreted, but I'm not certain about that.

Atheist capitalism certainly seems harder. I can see why communism would crush religious institutions, deeming it "bourgeois", but what need would a capitalist regime have for doing that? Although, as other members have mentioned, a form of materialistic scientific technocracy could work.
 
Atheist capitalism certainly seems harder. I can see why communism would crush religious institutions, deeming it "bourgeois", but what need would a capitalist regime have for doing that? Although, as other members have mentioned, a form of materialistic scientific technocracy could work.
It depends on what other ideologies it is channelling.

It could also be a reaction - "we must be the opposite of the enemy".
 
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