AH Cultural Descriptions

The Prince of Prance
A Netflix documentary about nfl all-star Marcus Dupree, who became known by the nickname “the prince of prance” for his beautiful footwork and running style that led him to be one of the top running backs in the nfl, in spite of playing for the lowly San Diego Chargers. The documentary covered Dupree’s life and career and was hailed as one of the best sports documentary’s of the 2010’s.

Prepare Uranus!
 
Prepare Uranus!
An in-name-only sequel to The Kentucky-Fried Movie released in 1980. The film went through an incredibly troubled production. After the success of TKFM, ZAZ started work on a sequel, which was to be a series of sketches building up to a sci-fi parody, "The Thing That Ate Detroit", the same way that TKFM built up to the kung-fu parody "A Fistful of Yen". Unfortunately, the three couldn't agree on the content of the lead-in sketches, with Abrahams wanting to go in a more directly satirical direction (one suggestion being "the Nixon Parachute Kit", a parody commercial for a product designed to save the reputations of scandalized policitians) and the Zuckers wanting to be more broadly comedic. Ultimately the sketches were scrapped and it was decided to focus solely on the sci-fi spoof. Not having the money to release independently again, ZAZ went to Paramount for assistance, only to end up having to whittle down their planned content to meet a PG rating after Paramount executives took offense to the racy humor in the original script. The film limped out the door and was a box-office disaster, ending the trio's run before it could even begin.

I Stand For Nothing
 
Picard's Gambit
The name of a TNG-era novel about Jean-luc Picard being forced, by cosmic entities of nearly Q-level power, into playing a vast, complex game vaguely similar to chess with the crew of the Enterprise as the stakes. Picard manages to learn the underlying tricks of the game, revealing how simple it is at it's most basic, despite all the surface appearances. In the end, Picard wins by playing the most simple strategy imaginable, and his opponent, expecting more complex strategy, falls for it.

The book did not sell well, however, as many fans felt the writer didn't have Picard's voice right.

Wallenstein 2020
 
The name of a TNG-era novel about Jean-luc Picard being forced, by cosmic entities of nearly Q-level power, into playing a vast, complex game vaguely similar to chess with the crew of the Enterprise as the stakes. Picard manages to learn the underlying tricks of the game, revealing how simple it is at it's most basic, despite all the surface appearances. In the end, Picard wins by playing the most simple strategy imaginable, and his opponent, expecting more complex strategy, falls for it.

The book did not sell well, however, as many fans felt the writer didn't have Picard's voice right.

Wallenstein 2020
A satirical Internet campaign launched prior to the 2020 election, suggesting that all candidates play against each other in a tournament based around the board game Wallenstein, with the ultimate winner being declared President. Trump was told of the campaign and expressed a public interest in carrying out such a tournament; Biden, however, was reportedly unamused.

Every Day With Curt LeMay
 
Every Day With Curt LeMay
Long-running radio (1932-1952), then television (1953-1972) program hosted by Curtis E. LeMay (1906-1990) who used the program to explain the whys and wherefores of public works construction to the general public, drawing on his knowledge of civil engineering. LeMay's remarkable ability to explain engineering issues for the layman - along with his gentle good humor - is credited with with generating an upsurge of public interest in civil engineering, and many prominent civil engineers cite him as an inspiration. Five bridges and fifteen public buildings are named in his honor.

The Shōwa Emperor and the Unique Fish
 
The Shōwa Emperor and the Unique Fish
A picture of Hirohito fishing with Douglas MacArthur on a trip to the United States in 1948, where in Arkansas he caught a massive Gar fish, which astounded post-war Japan. This picture became the basis of America and Japan's friendship, by showing two previously opposing worlds coming together on friendly terms.

The King of Nipples
 
A picture of Hirohito fishing with Douglas MacArthur on a trip to the United States in 1948, where in Arkansas he caught a massive Gar fish, which astounded post-war Japan. This picture became the basis of America and Japan's friendship, by showing two previously opposing worlds coming together on friendly terms.

The King of Nipples
A humorous nickname of the King of Naples given to him after his dethronement by his own population

Graf Bismarckula
 
A historical fiction Novel about Louis Napoleon's (Napoleon III) coup of the Second French Republic, focusing on how the Second Republic had basically killed itself with it's own mistakes and issues, and that fact that at first, Napoleon III's coup was, broadly speaking, quite popular. The book, published in 2005, ended up becoming the basis for a small Netflix Original series in 2015 that did really well, and the series got renewed to cover more of Napoleon III's reign and his eventual fall during the Franco-Prussian War. This also led to Netflix picking up more historical fictions and turning them into Original series, including Colleen McCoullough's Rome series, and a series about the English Civil Wars, focusing on the wives and daughters of some of the prominent men of the period.

The Prince of Prance
One of the most famed animal actors in film history, the horse Warm August earned the nickname "the Prince of Prance" for his feats of athleticism which he was able to perform on command.

EDIT: My bad. Here's the one:

A humorous nickname of the King of Naples given to him after his dethronement by his own population

Graf Bismarckula
The title of a well-known German Marxist political cartoon, depicting Herbert von Bismarck as sucking the lifeblood out of the German proletariat.

Adam Ant
 
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The King of Nipples
Rumored director's cut of the 1952 RKO spectacle movie 'Machiavelli, King of Naples'. Reportedly cut together from unedited scenes and extra material by no other than RKO's then president Howard Hughes. For those who knew Hughes' approach to scene cutting, focusing on the cleavage of the female lead rather then the storyline, the title needs no explanation.

Today most scholars agree that although Hughes DID have a copy of the raw footage of the mie and he DID enjoy cutting it up in his private darkroom, as he did with many other RKO movies, the 'project' was entirely Hughes' private pastime and the 'King of Nipples' was never even supposed to be finished, let alone distributed. Yet, the supposed 'censored and burried' movie was still used as a supposed ruse perpetuated by the terrorists in Die Hard VII

Oops, ninjaed. My bad....
So the next assignment is still:

Adam Ant
 
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Ok. Quickie:
Graf Bismarckula

Mascot for Garrison & Keillor Cereal Co.'s Triple German Chocolate Breakfast Cereal, the figure was introduced in 2010 after their previous mascot Count Dookula earned the company a copyright lawsuit from LucasFilm-DisneyCorp.

So the next assignment is still
Adam Ant
 
Ok. Quickie:


Mascot for Garrison & Keillor Cereal Co.'s Triple German Chocolate Breakfast Cereal, the figure was introduced in 2010 after their previous mascot Count Dookula earned the company a copyright lawsuit from LucasFilm-DisneyCorp.

So the next assignment is still
Adam Ant
The name of a poorly-received superhero who had the ability to turn into a swarm of Ants. Published by DC in the 1980s, he would get a single run of 12 comics that sold poorly, and then be quietly retconned out of existence until being inexplicably brought back during the 2015 Second Crisis continuity reboot, though he would be mostly used as a punchline rather than treated seriously.

The Prompt Nobody Wanted
 
The Prompt Nobody Wanted
A running gag on the quiz show "And If You Thought That Was Bad", which ran on NBC from 1976 to 1981. The show was built around selecting prompts from a large menu, then answering questions relating to it. After no one chose the prompt "A Night at the Opera" in five separate episodes, host George Carlin suggested it was "the prompt nobody wanted". For the remainder of the show's run, every time "A Night at the Opera" appeared, it was revealed with ominous music and a dimming of the lights.

Ramming Speed, Everyone!
 
An iconic line said by Annikin Starkiller in the 1977 movie The Star Wars, as the Rebellion makes their attack on the Imperial forces in the Battle of Aquilae.

The Tokyo Wall
The wall built to separate North Tokyo part of the People's Republic of Japan from South Tokyo part of the Kingdom of Japan.

The Dash
 
The wall built to separate North Tokyo part of the People's Republic of Japan from South Tokyo part of the Kingdom of Japan.

The Dash
"The Dash" or "Monty's Dash" refers to the extremely quick Allied campaign in North Africa. After the death of Erwin Rommel during the Second Battle of El Alamein in November 1942, the Axis forces were left demoralised and disorganised. Montgomery met with the displaced King of Libya and Bey of Tunis (both of whom were displaced by Italian colonial policy) as well as the Sultan of Morocco (a man known for his hatred of Hitler and sympathy for the Jews, but nonetheless was extremely anti-French and pro-independence), and promised them their independence in exchange for their military support against the Axis, something which he didn't have the authority to do. Islamic holy men across North Africa proclaimed a jihad against the Axis, and with the assistance of North African partisans and international Islamic mujahideen, Monty was able to pursue the retreating Axis forces from El Alamein to Algiers in just four weeks. In Algiers, the German and Italian forces in North Africa formally surrendered to Monty and Idries of Libya, sheikh of the Senoussi Sufi Order and the King of Libya in exile, and leader of the Libyan partisans and mujahideen.
However, history repeats itself. Despite Monty's efforts to lobby on behalf of the North Africans, Churchill supported the resumption of French control over Tunisia and Morocco, and the creation of a British client-state in Libya. Betrayed first by Lawrence of Arabia during World War I, and again by Monty of the Sahara during World War II, Arabs and Muslims around the world began conceiving of themselves in decidedly anti-Western terms, and the network of international mujahideen which the Allies sponsored during World War II would be the ancestors of many Islamist and anti-colonial militant organisations throughout the Cold War.

The Peacock Throne
 
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"The Dash" or "Monty's Dash" refers to the extremely quick Allied campaign in North Africa. After the death of Erwin Rommel during the Second Battle of El Alamein in November 1942, the Axis forces were left demoralised and disorganised. Montgomery met with the displaced King of Libya and Bey of Tunis (both of whom were displaced by Italian colonial policy) as well as the Sultan of Morocco (a man known for his hatred of Hitler and sympathy for the Jews, but nonetheless was extremely anti-French and pro-independence), and promised them their independence in exchange for their military support against the Axis, something which he didn't have the authority to do. Islamic holy men across North Africa proclaimed a jihad against the Axis, and with the assistance of North African partisans and international Islamic mujahideen, Monty was able to pursue the retreating Axis forces from El Alamein to Algiers in just four weeks. In Algiers, the German and Italian forces in North Africa formally surrendered to Monty.
However, history repeats itself. Despite Monty's efforts to lobby on behalf of the North Africans, Churchill supported the resumption of French control over Tunisia and Morocco, and the creation of a British client-state in Libya. Betrayed first by Lawrence of Arabia during World War I, and again by Monty of the Sahara during World War II, Arabs and Muslims around the world began conceiving of themselves in decidedly anti-Western terms, and the network of international mujahideen which the Allies sponsored during World War II would be the ancestors of many Islamist and anti-colonial militant organisations throughout the Cold War.

The Peacock Throne
The physical seat of power in Siam, one of the few remaining monarchies in which the monarch is openly active as head of the government. Though not actually inspired by the peacock, the shape of the throne’s back and its colourful inlays lend themselves to the comparison. In theory, anyone who sits upon the throne wields the power of the monarch, but in practice, the orders given by anyone not considered legitimate will be subverted, delayed, and otherwise blocked. The throne itself, despite being carved from stone, has been described as surprisingly comfortable.

Champions: Outlawed
 
Champions: Outlawed
The first expansion for the MMORPG Champions Online, an adaptation of the tabletop role-playing game of the same name. This expansion introduced the "Anti-Hero" option for character building, modeled after vigilante heroes on the Batman model. Cryptic Studios had originally intended to make their own setting, but someone on the design team had the idea to ask if the Champions license was available during the design phase.

Ice, Lightning, Fire, and Blood
 
Ice, Lightning, Fire, and Blood
The name of a handbook for the Tabletop Roleplaying Game Elementalism Unleashed. The book detailed character options, advancement trees, perks and spell recipes for any player that specialized in the so-called 4 Deadly Arts - Ice, Lightning Fire and Blood. The title was poorly received as being lazy, but the book was one of the best-selling specialist handbooks of the entire gameline.

Cashier: The Boredom
 
Cashier: The Boredom
Role-playing game in the World of Darkness franchise by Onyx Path Entertainment. Alongside such titles as Warrior: the Wrath, Lobbyist: The Corruption, and Trader: The Greed, the World of Darkness was among the first of the "dark" role-playing games, showing a dystopian cyberpunk world religion was completely divorced from reality and government (a hodgepodge of federations and alliances) was both malicious and incompetent, controlled by international megacorporations who also warped computing networks into a vice-reinforcing necessity looking for profit.

Of these, Cashier: the Boredom is a short comic-relief game taking place in the same universe and using the same mechanics, giving both snippets of everyday life and scenarios which the players themselves would likely have met under their own jobs. This game became popular not to be played, but because the stories contained within gave a clearer view of everyday life in that universe than any other line. Because of that, Cashier is considered vital to writing any fanfiction within it.

Finnegan's Wake: Abridged and Edited Edition
 
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