So a change in First-Among-Equals within the Triumvirate?
Yeah definitely, you’ll see someone new rise while Senghor falls into the background for a bit, diplomatically the agreements made with The Gambia and Tuaregs will be unpopular and he’ll cede ever more power to the military so the popular general will rise
 
Part 5: 1960 - 1965
Part 5: 1960-1965

And Then There Were Two

The last Five Years of the so-called Senghor Chairmanship saw the Second Casamance Conflict, Collapse of Senghor’s popularity even in Dakar, and Upper Senegal, continued Agrarian Cooperativization and growing calls for democratization of Malian Socialism.

The Second Casamance Conflict (62-63) would spring up from The Gambian Compromise. Casamance would show discontent over Gambia being offered looser state status, and being allowed to manage their own militia, and internal parliament. Protestors and resistance groups would clash with the Black Army, and parliamentary Red Guard, though their resistance fierce, the Triumvirate once again came out on top of Casamance. People were starting to tire of the continued occupation, and rebelling against Mali, so many began to go back to their farms, and cooperate if reluctantly with the Malian economic system. The exhaustive conflict with Casamance also had rippling effects on the military too. A small but growing group of military officer reformists would begin to develop, this would be called the Young Officers Clique, and these reformists would wish to impose the council state originally promised by the government and Triumvirate. This group would remain small and in the shadows but would see their influence begin to rapidly increase as Sénghor fell away from power, and the military become massively more important.

Economically, Sénghor was able to be more successful. Cooperativization of agriculture and factories, cooperating hand in hand with unelected party worker councils, as well as slow industrialization and electrification of cities had seen Mali grow from a poor backwater to an at least functioning state. New railways and roads connected parts of the Federation like never before, and government work programs employed civilians wherever work was needed done. This would come at the cost of civilian casualties, unrest, and increasing demands for the promises the government had originally made.



Across the Federation people had grown increasingly tired with Sénghor. Their standards of living had started to grow, crop yields seeing a shift, and literacy rates rising, but yet civilians had been given no active say in their government. Even in Dakar, and Upper Senegal regions that wholeheartedly had supported Sénghor throughout the revolution, found themselves troubled with his despotism. Even the expansions in railway, electricity, and education everyone across the Federation had become increasingly fed up with Sénghor calling the shots, and the party knew this. It was time to call a private party Congress lest Sénghor drag the whole nation down with him.

In the 1964 Party Congress, Daniel Ouezzin Coulibaly made his move usurping the once powerful Sénghor. While he would still technically sit on the Triumvirate he was a defeated man, relegated to writing in his room, and avoiding almost all public events. Coulibaly who had created the Malian Black Army, and Internal Security Bureau he planned to create a new culture and people of Mali. National Conscription, National Language, National Youth Pioneers, and Malian Women’s Auxiliaries. Coulibaly had planned for a new National-Socialist state. Unfortunately for him, it didn’t seem like he would live to see it.



Afterthought: Hello once again, Sénghor is out as we approach the final two in our Triumvirate or should I say Duumvirate for all intensive purposes. Coulibaly’s entire personality is fictional finding anything on this guy was difficult, so I made him a more militant socialist, he won’t be staying around long so I wouldn’t worry about it. Anyways, I’ve been posting quite a bit recently sorry if spam posts bother you, or if they seem sloppy I’ve been having fun writing these lately. Once I reach Sankara (who’ll be a pretty young leader in this timeline) things will slow a bit as I’ll explore more of how culture is developing, and all that good stuff. Well, that’s all I have, goodnight and be good to each other.
 
Very good precedent they've set. Soft purges/relegations would create a far better atmosphere within both the party and the nation.
 
Next post will be a bit different a little sidetrack from the story, looking at what Malian socialism is, what it will develop into, and its general ideological principles. This will kind of help explain the hatred of even the intellectual class towards the Triumvirate as their continuous failures to bring about the promises ideological strain.
 
Part 6: Sidebar on Ideology
Part 6: Sidebar on Ideology

Malian Socialism was based upon the idea of a worker council rulership, on democratic socialism, on the utopia of the old pre-colonial Mali, on an non-racialist state nationalism, on the ideal of an entire nation regimented in black, on the rejection of parliamentary democracy, on anti-capitalism. These principles of Malian Socialism was known as the “Cults of Socialism”

1. The first feature of Malian Socialism is the Cult of Pre-Colonialism. Of course pre-colonialist thought is by no means unique to Mali, the lengths to which they would develop an almost prelapsarian disconnect between pre colonialism and European contact. Much of this thought world center around social classes being completely in harmony and based upon job than some pre-inscribed class. A harmony and synthesis between technology and nature. A generation of communal economics and labor, and a culture of secularist, and multi ethnic harmony.

2.
The Cult of Syncretism. This pre-colonial view would give way to a syncretic culture and society. Malian socialism thus emphasizes The Cult of Syncretism. Syncretism is not only, as the dictionary says, "the combination of different forms of belief or practice"; such a combination must tolerate contradictions. This new Malian culture would not only idealize the idea of a cultural rebirth but would also adopt and merge the various cultures found within its borders, unifying a patchwork into a melting pot.

3. The Cult of Afro-Futurism. Pre-Colonialism implies the rejection of modernism. However; Malian Socialism holds technology, and futurism in the highest regards. It’s only rejections come with that this futurism should blend and protect nature and the communal lifestyle of African cultures. Its praise of modernism was only the surface of, social equality and technological advancement, the rejection of the modern world was a rebuttal of the capitalistic way of life, and materialist obsessions of the west.


4.
The Cult of Youth Action. Action being beautiful in itself, the youth are the constant torchbearers of any revolution and way of life. Thus the youth must be encouraged to always expand their horizons and build upon what came before. Youth individualism to go against social norms and experiment artistically and technology must be encouraged.

5. The Cult of the Cooperative. The true builders of society Malian socialism upholds the ideals of workers control over the economy. Agriculturally, industrially, and service sectors must be held in workers democratic control. While being the drivers of society, Malian socialism does not reject individual enterprise as the creation of a new business often cannot and will not gain traction if smothered by bureaucracy, and political intrigue, thus small businesses exist and continue to exist in their own right.

6. The Cult of Assimilation. While syncretic in nature of all things and cultures, and adopting social moderate policies towards minorities of different ethnicities, Malian socialism upholds that all should assimilate and become a new piece in Malian society. Each group, and each culture has a building block to play yet new immigrants should become one with the state, thus emphasizing the important of a single united national identity.

7.
The Cult of Frustration. Malian Socialism derives from individual or social frustration. That is why one of the most typical features of the historical socialism was the appeal to a frustrated middle class, a class suffering from an economic crisis or feelings of political humiliation, and frightened by the pressure of lower social groups.

8.
The Cult of Class Harmony. The Malian Socialist does not go as far as communist ideologies in declaring the destruction of social classes to be the final goal. For the existence of such classes is believed to be inevitable. Malian socialism only pushes for the meritocratic existence of these classes, for them to be based purely upon jobs done, from peasant, blue collar, white collar, intelligentsia, and artist. These classes should be static and enterable for those who are able. The hierarchy of cooperative owners and managers should only be democratic in nature and be removable by the people who put them in that upper position.

9.
Cult of Charity. The followers must feel disgusted and dejected by the ostentatious wealth of capitalist nations. For Malian socialism must emphasize that while its citizens ought to live comfortably, and no citizen should starve, hoarding of wealth and material must be seen as an evil. Thus a charitable society that is willing to help out those who are less fortunate is prioritized.

10.
Cult of Peace. There is in Malian Socialism a desire for peace and pacifism. Due to the nature and size of the state itself the bare necessities for a prosperous society exist, thus the Malian socialist avoids expansionism prioritizing pacifism, and defense of the borders and state.

11.
Cult of Decentralization. Malian socialism believes that everything from the economics, to the governing should be as flat of a hierarchy as possible. Thus, everything from economic planning is decentralized and democratic, to the markets being restricted by the state, and a clear line between federal and state power.

12.
Cult of Equality. Malian society is filled with many peoples, and religions. Thus, a society based upon equality between all groups, men, women, heterosexual, homosexual, Christian, or Muslim all groups must be built and merged into Mali. Even economically, income disparity must be kept as low as possible to avoid elitism within the state.

13.
Cult of the Individual. While being a collective culture, collective society, and collective economics the right and push for an individual life and drive must be always protected. The right to create, to express, and live as one owns self is upheld and protected under Malian Socialism.


These principles of Malian Socialism while often espoused and pushed by the various leaders of the Federation, it was not fully implemented until the era of Sankara and the democratic rebellion of 1975.

Afterthought: Well, there’s a sidebar for ideology, I always found writing out my general belief system interesting, I remember even when I was young I would pull out my great grandfathers old typewriter and write away at my perceptions and prescriptions of the world. Utter rubbish to read now looking back. I was a fascist no other word for it. Nationalistic, racist, expansionist, and mysticist. I am glad to have left those ostensibly bad ideals behind me, but yet I still rather enjoy writing my ideology down, like I did here. Anyways, long rant over Ciao Ciao be good to each other.
 
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Part 6: Sidebar on Ideology

Malian Socialism was based upon the idea of a worker council rulership, on democratic socialism, on the utopia of the old pre-colonial Mali, on an non-racialist state nationalism, on the ideal of an entire nation regimented in black, on the rejection of parliamentary democracy, on anti-capitalism. These principles of Malian Socialism was known as the “Cults of Socialism”

1. The first feature of Malian Socialism is the Cult of Pre-Colonialism. Of course pre-colonialist thought is by no means unique to Mali, the lengths to which they would develop an almost prelapsarian disconnect between pre colonialism and European contact. Much of this thought world center around social classes being completely in harmony and based upon job than some pre-inscribed class. A harmony and synthesis between technology and nature. A generation of communal economics and labor, and a culture of secularist, and multi ethnic harmony.

2.
The Cult of Syncretism. This pre-colonial view would give way to a syncretic culture and society. Malian socialism thus emphasizes The Cult of Syncretism. Syncretism is not only, as the dictionary says, "the combination of different forms of belief or practice"; such a combination must tolerate contradictions. This new Malian culture would not only idealize the idea of a cultural rebirth but would also adopt and merge the various cultures found within its borders, unifying a patchwork into a melting pot.

3. The Cult of Afro-Futurism. Pre-Colonialism implies the rejection of modernism. However; Malian Socialism holds technology, and futurism in the highest regards. It’s only rejections come with that this futurism should blend and protect nature and the communal lifestyle of African cultures. Its praise of modernism was only the surface of, social equality and technological advancement, the rejection of the modern world was a rebuttal of the capitalistic way of life, and materialist obsessions of the west.


4.
The Cult of Youth Action. Action being beautiful in itself, the youth are the constant torchbearers of any revolution and way of life. Thus the youth must be encouraged to always expand their horizons and build upon what came before. Youth individualism to go against social norms and experiment artistically and technology must be encouraged.

5. The Cult of the Cooperative. The true builders of society Malian socialism upholds the ideals of workers control over the economy. Agriculturally, industrially, and service sectors must be held in workers democratic control. While being the drivers of society, Malian socialism does not reject individual enterprise as the creation of a new business often cannot and will not gain traction if smothered by bureaucracy, and political intrigue, thus small businesses exist and continue to exist in their own right.

6. The Cult of Assimilation. While syncretic in nature of all things and cultures, and adopting social moderate policies towards minorities of different ethnicities, Malian socialism upholds that all should assimilate and become a new piece in Malian society. Each group, and each culture has a building block to play yet new immigrants should become one with the state, thus emphasizing the important of a single united national identity.

7.
The Cult of Frustration. Malian Socialism derives from individual or social frustration. That is why one of the most typical features of the historical socialism was the appeal to a frustrated middle class, a class suffering from an economic crisis or feelings of political humiliation, and frightened by the pressure of lower social groups.

8.
The Cult of Class Harmony. The Malian Socialist does not go as far as communist ideologies in declaring the destruction of social classes to be the final goal. For the existence of such classes is believed to be inevitable. Malian socialism only pushes for the meritocratic existence of these classes, for them to be based purely upon jobs done, from peasant, blue collar, white collar, intelligentsia, and artist. These classes should be static and enterable for those who are able. The hierarchy of cooperative owners and managers should only be democratic in nature and be removable by the people who put them in that upper position.

9.
Cult of Charity. The followers must feel disgusted and dejected by the ostentatious wealth of capitalist nations. For Malian socialism must emphasize that while its citizens ought to live comfortably, and no citizen should starve, hoarding of wealth and material must be seen as an evil. Thus a charitable society that is willing to help out those who are less fortunate is prioritized.

10.
Cult of Peace. There is in Malian Socialism a desire for peace and pacifism. Due to the nature and size of the state itself the bare necessities for a prosperous society exist, thus the Malian socialist avoids expansionism prioritizing pacifism, and defense of the borders and state.

11.
Cult of Decentralization. Malian socialism believes that everything from the economics, to the governing should be as flat of a hierarchy as possible. Thus, everything from economic planning is decentralized and democratic, to the markets being restricted by the state, and a clear line between federal and state power.

12.
Cult of Equality. Malian society is filled with many peoples, and religions. Thus, a society based upon equality between all groups, men, women, heterosexual, homosexual, Christian, or Muslim all groups must be built and merged into Mali. Even economically, income disparity must be kept as low as possible to avoid elitism within the state.

13.
Cult of the Individual. While being a collective culture, collective society, and collective economics the right and push for an individual life and drive must be always protected. The right to create, to express, and live as one owns self is upheld and protected under Malian Socialism.


These principles of Malian Socialism while often espoused and pushed by the various leaders of the Federation, it was not fully implemented until the era of Sankara and the democratic rebellion of 1975.

Afterthought: Well, there’s a sidebar for ideology, I always found writing out my general belief system interesting, I remember even when I was young I would pull out my great grandfathers old typewriter and write away at my perceptions and prescriptions of the world. Utter rubbish to read now looking back. I was a fascist no other word for it. Nationalistic, racist, expansionist, and mysticist. I am glad to have left those ostensibly bad ideals behind me, but yet I still rather enjoy writing my ideology down, like I did here. Anyways, long rant over Ciao Ciao be good to each other.
Yet another marvelous update on the timeline, the detailed but organic explanation of the principles of this divergent socialism is truly fascinating, I had a flashback when I read "Futurism", nevertheless I’m expecting something related to foreign policy.

¡Keep the good work!
 
Malian society is filled with many peoples, and religions. Thus, a society based upon equality between all groups, men, women, heterosexual, homosexual, Christian, or Muslim all groups must be built and merged into Mali. Even economically, income disparity must be kept as low as possible to avoid elitism within the state.
I cannot see this being preached by anyone in a position of authority in Mali, esp. in the 50s-60s. It was just a few months ago that an homosexual young man was beaten by a group of men posted on social media with on lookers merely spectating. The vast majority of the nation's citizens are muslims so it's very unlikely to say the least, ditto even in christian and animist communities. Hell even the equality of women won't be enforceable for decades yet.
 
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I cannot see this being preached by anyone in a position of authority in Mali, esp. in the 50s-60s. It was just a few months ago that an homosexual young man was beaten by a group of young man posted on social media with on lookers merely spectating. The vast majority of the nation's citizens are muslims so it's very unlikely to say the least, ditto even in christian and animist communities. Hell even the equality of women won't be enforceable for decades yet.
Nah that stuff won’t become part of common discourse till the 70’s-80’s the best Mali would do right now is not outlaw it like Senegal did. The 70’s-80’s period will see sort of fights for increased civil rights and crackdowns on reactionaries
 
Part 6: Sidebar on Ideology

Malian Socialism was based upon the idea of a worker council rulership, on democratic socialism, on the utopia of the old pre-colonial Mali, on an non-racialist state nationalism, on the ideal of an entire nation regimented in black, on the rejection of parliamentary democracy, on anti-capitalism. These principles of Malian Socialism was known as the “Cults of Socialism”

1. The first feature of Malian Socialism is the Cult of Pre-Colonialism. Of course pre-colonialist thought is by no means unique to Mali, the lengths to which they would develop an almost prelapsarian disconnect between pre colonialism and European contact. Much of this thought world center around social classes being completely in harmony and based upon job than some pre-inscribed class. A harmony and synthesis between technology and nature. A generation of communal economics and labor, and a culture of secularist, and multi ethnic harmony.

2.
The Cult of Syncretism. This pre-colonial view would give way to a syncretic culture and society. Malian socialism thus emphasizes The Cult of Syncretism. Syncretism is not only, as the dictionary says, "the combination of different forms of belief or practice"; such a combination must tolerate contradictions. This new Malian culture would not only idealize the idea of a cultural rebirth but would also adopt and merge the various cultures found within its borders, unifying a patchwork into a melting pot.

3. The Cult of Afro-Futurism. Pre-Colonialism implies the rejection of modernism. However; Malian Socialism holds technology, and futurism in the highest regards. It’s only rejections come with that this futurism should blend and protect nature and the communal lifestyle of African cultures. Its praise of modernism was only the surface of, social equality and technological advancement, the rejection of the modern world was a rebuttal of the capitalistic way of life, and materialist obsessions of the west.


4.
The Cult of Youth Action. Action being beautiful in itself, the youth are the constant torchbearers of any revolution and way of life. Thus the youth must be encouraged to always expand their horizons and build upon what came before. Youth individualism to go against social norms and experiment artistically and technology must be encouraged.

5. The Cult of the Cooperative. The true builders of society Malian socialism upholds the ideals of workers control over the economy. Agriculturally, industrially, and service sectors must be held in workers democratic control. While being the drivers of society, Malian socialism does not reject individual enterprise as the creation of a new business often cannot and will not gain traction if smothered by bureaucracy, and political intrigue, thus small businesses exist and continue to exist in their own right.

6. The Cult of Assimilation. While syncretic in nature of all things and cultures, and adopting social moderate policies towards minorities of different ethnicities, Malian socialism upholds that all should assimilate and become a new piece in Malian society. Each group, and each culture has a building block to play yet new immigrants should become one with the state, thus emphasizing the important of a single united national identity.

7.
The Cult of Frustration. Malian Socialism derives from individual or social frustration. That is why one of the most typical features of the historical socialism was the appeal to a frustrated middle class, a class suffering from an economic crisis or feelings of political humiliation, and frightened by the pressure of lower social groups.

8.
The Cult of Class Harmony. The Malian Socialist does not go as far as communist ideologies in declaring the destruction of social classes to be the final goal. For the existence of such classes is believed to be inevitable. Malian socialism only pushes for the meritocratic existence of these classes, for them to be based purely upon jobs done, from peasant, blue collar, white collar, intelligentsia, and artist. These classes should be static and enterable for those who are able. The hierarchy of cooperative owners and managers should only be democratic in nature and be removable by the people who put them in that upper position.

9.
Cult of Charity. The followers must feel disgusted and dejected by the ostentatious wealth of capitalist nations. For Malian socialism must emphasize that while its citizens ought to live comfortably, and no citizen should starve, hoarding of wealth and material must be seen as an evil. Thus a charitable society that is willing to help out those who are less fortunate is prioritized.

10.
Cult of Peace. There is in Malian Socialism a desire for peace and pacifism. Due to the nature and size of the state itself the bare necessities for a prosperous society exist, thus the Malian socialist avoids expansionism prioritizing pacifism, and defense of the borders and state.

11.
Cult of Decentralization. Malian socialism believes that everything from the economics, to the governing should be as flat of a hierarchy as possible. Thus, everything from economic planning is decentralized and democratic, to the markets being restricted by the state, and a clear line between federal and state power.

12.
Cult of Equality. Malian society is filled with many peoples, and religions. Thus, a society based upon equality between all groups, men, women, heterosexual, homosexual, Christian, or Muslim all groups must be built and merged into Mali. Even economically, income disparity must be kept as low as possible to avoid elitism within the state.

13.
Cult of the Individual. While being a collective culture, collective society, and collective economics the right and push for an individual life and drive must be always protected. The right to create, to express, and live as one owns self is upheld and protected under Malian Socialism.


These principles of Malian Socialism while often espoused and pushed by the various leaders of the Federation, it was not fully implemented until the era of Sankara and the democratic rebellion of 1975.

Afterthought: Well, there’s a sidebar for ideology, I always found writing out my general belief system interesting, I remember even when I was young I would pull out my great grandfathers old typewriter and write away at my perceptions and prescriptions of the world. Utter rubbish to read now looking back. I was a fascist no other word for it. Nationalistic, racist, expansionist, and mysticist. I am glad to have left those ostensibly bad ideals behind me, but yet I still rather enjoy writing my ideology down, like I did here. Anyways, long rant over Ciao Ciao be good to each other.
Some thoughts:

-The Cult of Assimilation would seem to run contrary to the Cults of Pre-Colonialism, Decentralization, Youth Action, and the Individual.

-The cult of Class Harmony doesn't just distinguish Mali from Communism, but from Socialism as a whole. This doctrine puts "Malian Socialism" closer to "productive capitalism" than anything else. Which is interesting because that's similar to what many "socialist" regimes had in practice, but their official ideologies argue(d) this was merely a transitional state rather than what they were striving to achieve.

-as an addendum to the above, "The hierarchy of cooperative owners and managers should only be democratic in nature and be removable by the people who put them in that upper position. " A cooperative is traditionally owned by the "employees" (commonly called member-owners).

-does the cult of peace represent a formal disavowal of pan-africanism?
 
Cult of Peace doesn't necessarily mean complete rejection of Panafricanism. New states can still join voluntarily, and alliances can be made with non-member African states.

But yeah, they won't spread it by supporting coups and rebellions in other states, or military intervention / invasion. Or at least it's the theory.
 
Some thoughts:

-The Cult of Assimilation would seem to run contrary to the Cults of Pre-Colonialism, Decentralization, Youth Action, and the Individual.

-The cult of Class Harmony doesn't just distinguish Mali from Communism, but from Socialism as a whole. This doctrine puts "Malian Socialism" closer to "productive capitalism" than anything else. Which is interesting because that's similar to what many "socialist" regimes had in practice, but their official ideologies argue(d) this was merely a transitional state rather than what they were striving to achieve.

-as an addendum to the above, "The hierarchy of cooperative owners and managers should only be democratic in nature and be removable by the people who put them in that upper position. " A cooperative is traditionally owned by the "employees" (commonly called member-owners).

-does the cult of peace represent a formal disavowal of pan-africanism?
- I’d disagree on the Assimilation being contrary to. All assimilation believes is a unified language and cultural practices, this would be simply done through access to mass media, connection between cities and villages and even the isolated tribes that remain. Even then Culture can of course change and the youth lead that change.

-I agree and disagree on class harmony. Many socialists of the modern day are not trying to transition into some communist utopia just on the horizon. Plenty of DemSocs are fine pivoting to that point, I don’t believe Nordic DemSocs, or even other countries have any qualms about believe there is absolutely no way their countries will in the near future become some stateless classless global state.

-As someone who works in a cooperative we still have managers, and upper levels of control and administration, these positions are just merely elected, and controlled the positions below them. Now some farmers cooperatives are merely just unified farms operating as one market, but bigger businesses require managers and “owners”

-Mali will be far more focused on developing an internal national identity, though it will still greatly cooperate and diplomatically support other African states.
 
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-As someone who works in a cooperative we still have managers, and upper levels of control and administration, these positions are just merely elected, and controlled the positions below them. Now some farmers cooperatives are merely just unified farms operating as one market, but bigger businesses require managers and “owners”
Oh wait, you work at a worker cooperative? Whoa, what was it like really, compared to the conventional firm/company?
 
- I’d disagree on the Assimilation being contrary to. All assimilation believes is a unified language and cultural practices, this would be simply done through access to mass media, connection between cities and villages and even the isolated tribes that remain. Even then Culture can of course change and the youth lead that change.
In that case then I believe the Cult of Assimilation to be a little overstated for what amounts to "we won't do deep-multiculturalism or ethnic-federalism". Which isn't particularly much given no countries do the former, and very few do the latter.

-I agree and disagree on class harmony. Many socialists of the modern day are not trying to transition into some communist utopia just on the horizon. Plenty of DemSocs are fine pivoting to that point, I don’t believe Nordic DemSocs, or even other countries have any qualms about believe there is absolutely no way their countries will in the near future become some stateless classless global state.
Take care not to conflate SocDems (Social Democrats, ie capitalism with a strong welfare state) with DemSocs (Democratic Socialists, ie socialism with few tanks). It is true that in the Nordic Countries the DemSocs tend to function as junior partners to the SocDems, but that's a recent development. The Socialist People's Party of Denmark for instance was part of the European Parliament's "Communist and Allies Group" for the duration of the Cold War. Prior to the Berlin Wall coming down, an ostensibly socialist party openly dismissing communism as a utopian daydream would stick out like a sore thumb.

To my understanding these points are meant to represent Malian Socialism of the 60s-80s (up to the present as well?) in which case the disinterest in Communism seems a bit anachronistic. Though Mali isn't breaking bread with Moscow anyways so that ship may well have sailed already. In which case I wonder why Mali hasn't opportunistically dropped the socialist moniker given they aren't ideologically bound to contemporary socialist thought.

-As someone who works in a cooperative we still have managers, and upper levels of control and administration, these positions are just merely elected, and controlled the positions below them.
I'm aware. My point was about the "owners" not the managers, as your wording seemed to suggest that Malian coops were not member-owned.

-Mali will be far more focused on developing an internal national identity, though it will still greatly cooperate and diplomatically support other African states.
Ok, that seems like a sound policy for the era.
 
In that case then I believe the Cult of Assimilation to be a little overstated for what amounts to "we won't do deep-multiculturalism or ethnic-federalism". Which isn't particularly much given no countries do the former, and very few do the latter.


Take care not to conflate SocDems (Social Democrats, ie capitalism with a strong welfare state) with DemSocs (Democratic Socialists, ie socialism with few tanks). It is true that in the Nordic Countries the DemSocs tend to function as junior partners to the SocDems, but that's a recent development. The Socialist People's Party of Denmark for instance was part of the European Parliament's "Communist and Allies Group" for the duration of the Cold War. Prior to the Berlin Wall coming down, an ostensibly socialist party openly dismissing communism as a utopian daydream would stick out like a sore thumb.

To my understanding these points are meant to represent Malian Socialism of the 60s-80s (up to the present as well?) in which case the disinterest in Communism seems a bit anachronistic. Though Mali isn't breaking bread with Moscow anyways so that ship may well have sailed already. In which case I wonder why Mali hasn't opportunistically dropped the socialist moniker given they aren't ideologically bound to contemporary socialist thought.


I'm aware. My point was about the "owners" not the managers, as your wording seemed to suggest that Malian coops were not member-owned.


Ok, that seems like a sound policy for the era.
Because Mali advocates as an African socialist which within itself is to advocate a separate policy from Moscow. That’s why it’s more akin in system to the Yugoslavs or Vietnam, but never Moscow aligned especially with a far more democratic system. Just not being tied to to existing socialist movements doesn’t mean it wouldn’t be considered or consider itself socialist.

and I used owners as a misspeak. Sorry I do apologize.

Finally, there is no open disavowing of communism it’s just Mali follows socialism in one country, and is African socialist which is a far flung ideological strain, so it’s not unfair to say communism is not the main goal, in any near future.
 
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