Affiliated States of Boreoamerica thread

Polandball representing the different kind of accent amongst different langages (I might be wrong in a few of them tho)
Hello from Quarantine! To explain my long absence, I moved at the end of January. The desktop computer where I do all my maps and such got packed into boxes. And there it remains, since in the new place I still don't have a desk. I didn't feel right using a laptop from work to do alternate history, but hey, now we're all in Quarantine. I assume workplaces everywhere are going to be pretty lenient about how we use these things.

I love that the world of the ASB has just continued to grow without me, that it doesn't need me to flourish. I'll be brushing up on what I missed and try not to get in the way of it. For now I'm just responding to the Polandball comics.

Thanks so much. All the comics you've created are a joy. The only thing I'd change is using "Yankee" to describe Pennsylvania and the other middle-latitude states. Yankee in TTL is synonymous with New Englander. I don't know what other term would work for that panel ... OTL linguists use the term "Midland" for a similar region, that might work in a pinch.
 
Hello from Quarantine! To explain my long absence, I moved at the end of January. The desktop computer where I do all my maps and such got packed into boxes. And there it remains, since in the new place I still don't have a desk. I didn't feel right using a laptop from work to do alternate history, but hey, now we're all in Quarantine. I assume workplaces everywhere are going to be pretty lenient about how we use these things.

I love that the world of the ASB has just continued to grow without me, that it doesn't need me to flourish. I'll be brushing up on what I missed and try not to get in the way of it. For now I'm just responding to the Polandball comics.

Thanks so much. All the comics you've created are a joy. The only thing I'd change is using "Yankee" to describe Pennsylvania and the other middle-latitude states. Yankee in TTL is synonymous with New Englander. I don't know what other term would work for that panel ... OTL linguists use the term "Midland" for a similar region, that might work in a pinch.
So a native of Pennsylvania would be called a Midlander?
 
So a native of Pennsylvania would be called a Midlander?
They'd be called a Pennamite. (The term Pennsylvanian also exists, and it's more of a civic term, while Pennamite is more of an ethno-cultural term.) I'm searching for a term that could cover the English of Pennsylvania, Christiana, and the inland territories that they influenced.
 
Oh hi @False Dmitri.

I'm sure you've heard of this map I'm making, right:


I will ofc need a list of cities at least for Illinois and Ohio (and maybe HL, Dakota, and the Civilized Tribal states) because I use this as a basemap to place all the cities with.
 
Also what's the deal with the Russian possessions in Thrace, Cyprus, the Heptanese, etc? Did anyone sketch those places out? In case they were open, I asked around some ex-members I know and still keep in touch with. A Russian conquest of C-Town is difficult to figure out. It's not Kars, it's not Samarkand, it's not Crimea. How they rule it will need some real out of the box thinking and for them to tread lightly especially when all of still Anatolia appears to be Muslim-held solely going off the Commonwealth's map. Best I could squeeze out of those ex-members is that the odds of the Russians making Constantinople and its environs its own state are pretty high and the ruler would be a Romanov married to some princess from rent-a-royal German principality services, LLC. No one's going to be happy with Russian rule except the Slavic minority of the City and then the many Slavic villagers in Thrace. Certainly not the Romans and the Muslims. A lot of people in 1821 remember the Orlov Revolt and the betrayal. What time period are we looking at? Sometime around the real life Catherine the Great's reign in my opinion is best, so about 1762-1796 if not earlier. The 1700's are when the Balkans really accelerated its islamization. I read somewhere that Albania was still anywhere from .5-5% Muslim even between 1700-1750. Maybe the tsars can throw all that new Polish and Swede manpower at the war machine in their quest for the city.
That stems from the separate out-of-universe origin of the Imperial Commonwealth: as an unapologetic Russo-wank in which the tsars more-or-less continued to rule every bit of territory they ever held or dreamed of holding. With no regard to the historic contexts of the various parts of it. It was only later that I decided to graft this contraption to the ASB, which was similar, except that instead of a wank of a single power it was an ahistorical mishmash of interesting blended North American cultures. So why does the Commonwealth include Thrace and Constantinople? The simple, out-of-universe answer is that ruling it was the dream of many generations of tsars, and no proper Russo-wank would be complete without it.

Just like with the ASB itself, developing the Imperial Commonwealth has meant fleshing out the unrealistic givens of the scenario to create something plausible. Russian history has been brought up to the start of the reign of Dmitri I and VI, who ruled 1762-1802. We know that the empire pushed into a lot of new regions during that era, including Crimea, Manchuria, the Pacific, and inland North America. The major wars at the end of this reign and the start of the subsequent one were probably the time when Russia entered the Mediterranean. The Heptanese is a deliberate echo of the Septinsular Republic that Russia sponsored during the Napoleonic Wars of our timeline.

Clearly Russian control of the city would have major effects on the balance of power in the region; and the balance of forces within the city and state itself would also be always delicate and fraught. Clearly the Ottoman state has collapsed in order to make such a thing possible; that's something that has yet to be written. It's reasonable to suppose that Russian control in Thrace was accomplished via indirect rule. The key events were different from in OTL, because the key figures and the wider context were not the same.
 
LORDSHIP OF THE SALT LAKE¹

The Lordship of the Salt Lake was the lovechild of a wide amount of fur-trappers within the uninhabited and exploited areas of Northern Mexico. The first major leader of colonial efforts was Lord Peter Ogden², who settled Fort Henry (named after the then-British King William Henry, crowned William IV)³ in 1830. This fort, which later became Henrysville, served as a central meeting point for fur traders of all origins, attracting most thoroughly the trappers of Rupertia and of French America. These groups often intermingled with the Natives of the nearby watersheds and freshwater lakes, such as the Goshute, the Shoshone, and the Ute. Following the establishment of the piecemeal California, the Rupertian presence in the region strengthened and solidified, and inspired by states such as Russian California and New Albion, the Lordship of the Salt Lake became heavily associated with Rupertia, sometimes even being called Rupertian California.
Despite Henrysville being its current capital⁴, the largest city in Salt Lake is the French-settled Carrefour (literally "Crossroads" in French) along the coast of the Great Salt Lake, whose unique location along the huge saline lake makes it hugely popular among tourists. It is a parliamentarian state, with the head of state being the non-elected Lord, who is instead decided by the government in Rupertia.
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1. The flag's incredibly makeshift, but it uses the colors of the Canadian flag (I know there's no flag of Rupertia, but I felt it was safe to assume it might use the colors of our Canadian flag).
2. His title of Lord was given to him after he founded Fort Henry.
3. Name due to change, as British kings are probably different ITTL
4. Approximately Ogden, Utah. Carrefour is where Salt Lake City is.
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It's short, but that's a rough idea of what I was thinking. Feel free to trash it completely, it's just some thoughts I juggled together.
This fits in perfectly, if you ask me. A Salt Lake that avoids the cliche of "Yet Another Mormon State." For what it's worth, the Mormon presence in the region is negligible - their main area of settlement was along the Missouri River.
 
I did some math on native languages in the ASB. I made up a spreadsheet with some basic assumptions to make some broad estimates and I looked at multilingualism statistics for Quebec, Belgium, and Luxembourg to make this:
...


While urban areas are generally multilingual, where inhabitants may regularly use two or three languages on a daily basis, rural areas are often more isolated; in many smaller communities, monolingualism is the norm. As a result, while the average number of spoken languages is 3.2 in New Amsterdam and 2.3-2.8 in other cities, rural areas are estimated to range from 1.1 to 2.5, depending on geography. Across the whole ASB, the number of languages spoken is around 1.9, though the majority of ASB residents have a basic grasp of at least 3.
This is an impressive piece of work. The numbers work out very nicely, and I especially like the fact that English is the top native language but French is the top language when you add L1 and L2 speakers together.

Other languages
German is the most popular "foreign language" as defined by the census office. In addition to the longstanding German-speaking communities stretching from Pennsylvania to Pays-d'en-Haut, German is also the most popular language taught in schools aside from Confederal languages. German is sometimes called an "old immigrant" language, because most of its speakers in the ASB are native-born. It shares this distinction with Italian, Portuguese, Swedish, Welsh, and others.
I never got to my third language post, which will be about the remaining European languages. I know there must be a term for the smaller but well-established European languages, but I never picked one. German, Swedish, Scots and Gaelic stand out as having official status in at least one state. Given that, it would seem odd to classify them as "foreign," at least officially - though they might be considered as such outside the areas where they are spoken. Welsh and Irish are similar in that they are spoken in very long-established communities, though nowadays only in a couple of very remote pockets. Portuguese and Italian, by contrast, would be fairly classified as "old immigrant" languages.

My fourth planned language post will indeed center on Creole languages, agreeing with Venusian Si. I don't think they would require changing your numbers necessarily - most studies historically would indeed have counted creole speakers as belonging to their respective colonial language. And in reality creoles and colonial languages form a continuum; a speaker when asked which language they use might not be able to give a simple answer. Creoles certainly play a role in the ASB that's different from most contexts that we know from our timeline, and clarifying their status will take some further storytelling, I think.

Immigrant languages are a growing part of the ASB's linguistic landscape. In the past few decades, speakers of languages such as Chinese, Arabic, Russian, Nahuatl, Hindi, and other languages have grown rapidly due to increased immigration from "non-traditional" countries. The majority of learners of these languages are the children or spouses of native speakers.
We've tiptoed around this topic before. If you have solid ideas about modern-day immigration to the ASB, feel free to share! It appears that a good deal of immigration is from the North American family of nations, which is of course a natural place to look first.
 
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We've tiptoed around this topic before. If you have solid ideas about modern-day immigration to the ASB, feel free to share! It appears that a good deal of immigration is from the North American family of nations, which is of course a natural place to look first.
I've been working on this bit little by little, although I've been somewhat avoiding the new-world nations because I'm still not sure about the status of South America.
 
Unfortunately, I don't really have a full list of city names (especially for Illinois and Ohio). Maybe @False Dmitri can help
That's certainly something I can help with. For Ohio, there indeed are maps with town names. They're generally historic maps rather than contemporary ones, but the principal towns from that era have endured as centers of government and settlement. This is the only one I have access to at the moment, but it can be a starting point.

Here are some towns that remained important down to the present day. I'll give their locations with reference to towns on your basemap.
  • Vincennes (capital of its eponymous province): Same as Vincennes, Indiana
  • Ouiatenon (capital of Wea province): Lafayette, Indiana
  • Mississinewa (capital of Upper Wabash province): a bit to the east of Logansport, Indiana
  • Pekoui (state capita): a bit south of Sidney, Ohio
  • Losanville (capital of Losanti province): Cincinnati
  • Chalacatha (capital of its eponymous province): Chillicothe, Ohio
  • Coshocton (capital of East Muskingum province): Coshocton, Ohio
  • Greathouse (capital of The Ranges province): Marietta, Ohio
  • Youngstown (capital of its eponymous province): Same as Youngstown, Ohio
  • Gnadenburg (capital of Mühlenberg province): On the basemap, it's right by the "u" in Pittsburgh, and pretty much right where the Ohio-Pennsylvania border crosses the Ohio River.
  • North Fork (capital of Forks province): the western part of Pittsburgh, in the pocket between the Ohio and Allegheny Rivers
These towns are important because they're provincial capitals. Of course there may be some other cities to add that grew more recently as industrial centers. But again, this should be enough to start.
 
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I've been working on this bit little by little, although I've been somewhat avoiding the new-world nations because I'm still not sure about the status of South America.
Well the map, at least, is mostly filled in. The list of countries, from the wiki, is:
  • Dutch Suriname
  • Republic of New Torarica: Jewish-dominated state in Suriname's interior
  • Kingdom of New Providence: English dominion roughly occupying the space of OTL French Guiana
  • New Tuscany / Nuova Toscana: Former Italian colony in the Guyanas whose precise borders are not decided yet
  • Klein-Venedig: former German colony to the west of New Tuscany
  • Amazonian Confederation: small federal state on the lower Amazon, a union of former colonies that were established along the river
  • New Holland: descendant of Dutch Brazil, occupying the coast roughly from Maceió to Belém
  • Brazil
  • Peru: Much larger than in OTL, including the territory of Bolivia and Ecuador and much of Chile
  • Paraguay
  • Argentina
  • Unnamed former French penal colony in mid-latitude Chile
  • Patagonia: conquered by France in the Napoleonic era
  • Chiloé island
  • New Cymru: Welsh-speaking state at the southern tip of the continent
  • Falkland: colony of New England

The only totally blank spot left is roughly the area of Colombia. Either way, I would expect South American immigration to be rather less than immigration from other, closer parts of North America that the ASB has much closer interactions with.
 
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so i know i haven't done a lot on this thread, but i might as well jump in with my ideas from the middle east. i haven't fully fleshed out any countries yet but here's my general ideas
  • ottoman empire does gain control over middle east but soon falls apart
  • arab states form without european influence but ally with other nations
  • oman, najd and persia are more powerful states and persia is an ally to the russo-swedish-polish mega-monarchy.
note: i am considering persia's borders extending to the indus river, like so:
1585274572811.png

but i still haven't made up my mind. so, thoughts?
 
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