Affiliated States of Boreoamerica thread

Discussion in 'Alternate History Maps and Graphics' started by False Dmitri, Oct 5, 2011.

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  1. False Dmitri Я хочу пельменей

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    I think the likeliest course for Houston's life in TTL is that he permanently became a Cherokee citizen. The high point of his career in OTL coincides with TTL Cherokee's adoption of a modern constitution. Houston and others like him were instrumental in creating it.

    To give a little more context, the constitution was approved at some point around the year 1840. The village chiefs in the different parts of Cherokee were united for the first time in many years in the decision to name and back an emperor. The last several emperors had not been able to count on the support of all parts of Cherokee. We see that in the account of Watauga's history, where Watauga was able to make a treaty with the towns on the Little Tanasi even as it remained at war with the rest of the nation. But by the 1830s there was a clear desire to create a unified state government capable of representing all the Cherokee and preventing further encroachment on their territory. Sequoyah, the great teacher of literacy, was chosen as emperor because the chiefs wanted him to help write a constitution. Mixed-blood and adopted members of the nation were then key contributors, since they had more familiarity with organized statecraft.

    (edit)
    And I failed to respond to your tip on the pig drives. No, I hadn't seen that before, and I love it. And that's the sort of thing that would live on in the cultural memory of the ASB. The great cattle drives of the west most likely didn't exist - Texas ranchers almost certainly drove their cattle to ports on the Gulf rather than to trains bound for Chicago. Could hog drivers become stock characters in the literature of this timeline?
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2019
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  2. False Dmitri Я хочу пельменей

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    Here is the next century of history for the Imperial Commonwealth. This can also serve as the start for a chronology of European wars in the 18th century, something that's been sorely lacking. Obviously a lot still needs to be done to fill in detail for those final 40 years.

    family tree2.png

    Karl of the Palatinate

    Karl ascended the thrones of Sweden and Poland without much fuss, but the Russian boyars were more reluctant to accept this Protestant Westerner. He secured his throne after two years of violent unrest. He is considered the founder of the "Wittelsbach-Rurik" royal house, which has ruled the empire ever since.

    Karl I and X is credited with introducing absolutism to the empire, though only in Sweden. Absolutism took much longer to bring about in Russia and never really happened in Poland. The Swedish military became a well-oiled machine under the king's personal command. Some of those military reforms started to gradually extend to Poland and Russia, but Karl was not able to control the governments there like he did in Sweden.

    In military affairs Karl had to fight off a combined attack from Brandenburg and Austria, a recurring event of the 18th century and beyond. As a result of this war, he strengthened his hold on Prussia and Pomerania, blocking Brandenburg's access to the sea.

    During Karl's rule Sweden again started to pay attention to its former colony in North America, modern Christiana. After negotiating with the Penn family, Karl formed a small land company that bought and sold plots in the colony to settlers from Sweden, Finland, and the allied German state of Holstein-Gottorp. The tsar also sponsored the first trade and colonization attempts in the Pacific, which resulted in several small forts in Alaska, Oregon, and Hawaii.

    Karl had married a daughter of a Hessian landgrave when just a teenager, before coming to the throne; but he married most of his many children off to Polish and Russian magnates. By the time of his death in 1738, he believed he had established his dynasty in all three kingdoms. However, the empire was in for one more fight over the succession.

    The Karlovichi (Kasimir, Ivan, and Fridrich)

    Kasimir's reign began in war. Austria and Brandenburg had again been intriguing with Polsh nobles who feared that their kingdom was drifting toward hereditary succession and domination by Russia. When the Sejm made Kasimir king, a significant group immediately announced that they did not accept the result, then gathered their forces in the southwest to join with the invading armies. Kasimir, caught off guard, was slow to respond. Large areas of Poland fell to rebel and foreign troops before he could mount an organized counterattack.

    After two years in the field, Kasimir succumbed to an infection that had spread through camp, an inauspicious misfortune in a war of succession. His brother Ivan carried on the fight, launching at the invader the full strength of Sweden's military discipline, the vast resources of Russia, and the fighting spirit of the remaining loyal Poles. He even secured an alliance with Russia's old enemy, the Turks, who attacked Austrian territory from the south. Ivan VI and IV secured his hold on Poland after another three years of fighting. He had to permanently renounce any Polish pretensions to Silesia and return Transylvania to the Austrians, but in general the war had strengthened his position. The magnates who had led the opposition were executed or exiled, or lost their lands and titles. Some who had played a minor role in the rebellion threw themselves at the king's mercy, tripping over each other in their rush to profess their newfound loyalty. Many were later dispatched to govern distant corners of the empire.

    Ivan also exploited his postwar popularity to compel Russia's boyars to accept the principle of hereditary succession, the very thing the Polish szlachta had been so afraid of. He made no attempt to introduce such a law in Poland, but it was clear now that no one who was not from the House of Wittelsbach-Rurik would have much chance of winning an election for king.

    But Ivan also died after just a few years, passing the thrones to the third son of Karl of the Palatinate, Fridrich I. Fridrich already had an infant son when he came to power, and he and his wife Anastasia Golitsyn would have one more, along with their three daughters. The dynasty's loyalists breathed a sigh of relief.

    Fridrich's productive reign lasted just under twenty years. Under him the empire truly stepped into its role as a great power. Rather than fight for survival, he struggled for influence against shifting alliances of rival kings and emperors. Fighting along the southern border saw Poland re-conquer Transylvania and convert Moldavia into a vassal state. Fridrich's children were married not to local nobility, but to the sons and daughters of European royal houses.

    Dmitri I and VI

    The next tsar was named for his maternal grandfather Dmitri Golitsyn, a great Russian magnate who had become a close ally of the imperial family. His long reign - exactly forty years - saw Russia greatly expand its influence in the Far East and the Pacific.
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2019 at 7:16 AM
  3. False Dmitri Я хочу пельменей

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    To revisit a post from last month:

    Looking through older posts, I realized that there was actually quite a bit of content on Turks and Caicos. I've compiled it on my site and added some context. I'll copy it here so that it's shared, but this has already been posted.

    Early history
    Turks and Caicos is geographically part of the Bahamian archipelago, and before colonization its people were from the same group, known as the Lucayans. The Lucayans disappeared in the aftermath of Spanish slaving and disease.

    The Turks and Caicos islands were later colonized by English sailors coming from Bermuda, who developed the islands for salt production. Turks and Caicos' sandy beaches and shallow seas were perfect for raking salt. Eventually, the Bahamas disputed Bermuda's control, and the Congress of the Nations ultimately settled the issue in Bermuda's favor. More details of this history are on the Bermuda page.

    The flag and the Aquamarine Revolution
    [​IMG]

    A local citizen, Lucinda Knowles, created a version of the flag of Turks and Caicos around 2002. A few months later, with help from a writer for the islands' newspaper and a graphic artist from Cuba, she published an official description and began to promote it more widely. Its symbolism is multi-layered. The striped design reflects the islands' past as a possession of Virginia, but the stripes are wavy as befitting an island territory. There are seven stripes for the seven populated islands. The aquamarine represents the seas around the islands: they are in the same shallow banks as the Bahamas, resulting in the characteristic bright aqua color to the sea. The yellow stripes call to mind sunlight shimmering on the water, representing a new dawn for Turks and Caicos. There are two of them, one for the Turks islands and one for the Caicos. The white stripe in the center represents peace and friendship among the islands and between the islands and their neighbors. It also resembles mounds of salt raked up from an evaporation pool, recalling the industry that drove the Turks and Caicos for most of their recorded history.

    The flag caught on quickly both as an expression of civic pride and as a nice piece of branding for Turks and Caicos' tourist industry, which was going through a period of almost explosive growth.

    That growth was the origin of the turbulence of the ensuing period. The islands were flush with cash and drawing new workers, some staying just for the tourist season, others moving in permanently. The newcomers can be forgiven for not immediately getting involved in local politics, but this meant that that Turks and Caicos continued to be governed by the same clique of politicians. Most local leaders had gotten their start when the islands were a sleepy backwater, but now found themselves managing a rapidly growing population and tax revenues exponentially greater than what they had known before. Opportunities for corruption abounded. Bermudan state officials uncovered uncovered many of them. So rotten did Turks and Caicos' government seem to be that in 2011 the state assembly voted to dissolve it. A state-appointed board of local leaders was formed to govern the islands while necessary reforms could be put in place.

    Five years later, the board was still there. Progress on the promised anti-corruption reforms from the board and the state assembly had been slow. And during that time, the islands' tourism had continued to grow, and many of the new citizens had started to get involved in the local community. Political coalitions formed around the issue of restoring self-government to the islands. Frustrated islanders began a demonstration outside the government house in February 2016, which stretched out for days. People from Providenciales, the main tourist center, crossed to Grand Turk to join the demonstration, and many who could not demonstrated in Providenciales Town. Business was crippled at the height of the tourist season. The unofficial Turks and Caicos flag was ubiquitous among the participants in what the press called the "Aquamarine Revolution". It reached a dramatic climax when most of the appointed board members came out of the government house to join the protesters.

    The Aquamarine Revolution brought Turks and Caicos to the attention of the entire ASB. People asked how it was that Bermuda, of all places, had apparently been allowed to be the last colonial power in the confederation. Confederal officials stepped in to put pressure on Bermuda. A new committee of state and local leaders was formed to make a final draft of a reform package, and elections were scheduled to quickly restore Turks and Caicos' local assembly. The new assembly met in late 2016. In early 2017, it adopted the new-famous flag as the official flag of Turks and Caicos.

    The movement did not go away. It shifted toward promoting statehood and organized as a new political party. Pro-statehood members won a clear majority in the local assembly and most of Turks and Caicos' delegates in the Bermudan state assembly. A new, binding referendum took place at the same time as the next round of elections, in March 2018. With a strong feeling of momentum, and a flag to rally around, supporters of Turks and Caicos statehood were enthusiastic about their chances for success.

    Statehood

    The referendum produced a solid majority in favor of statehood. Bermuda and Turks-Caicos agreed to take one year to work out the details of a separation. The date was pushed back to May so that the celebrations can be free of distractions from the winter-spring tourist season.

    Now I don't know if I explicitly stated this, but I implied in one or two places that statehood was completed last summer, just months after the referendum. I had been thinking that it would be a nominal statehood - representation in Parliament and so forth - while everyone continued to hash out the details of the separation. I think it's all the Brexit news that has convinced me to rethink that timeline. Turks and Caicos is not "just" separating from Bermuda. As the recent history shows, it also is recovering from a lot of political turbulence in the past decade. Its current autonomous government is just over two years old. It's still cleaning up from a major, wide-ranging corruption scandal. So while the statehood party might be in a hurry, everyone else, at every level, wants to move slowly and make sure to get it right. So, the official timetable is: Referendum last march, then take 14 months to sort out all the political and financial details of the separation. Another election will choose Turks and Caicos' parliamentary delegation this month. In May, statehood will be celebrated as a new governor is inaugurated in Cockburn Town, the delegation is seated in New Amsterdam, and parties and parades happen all over the place.

    (That's not to say there haven't been parties and parades already. Islanders have recognized the tourism potential of an independence celebration and have held celebrations throughout the winter for the enjoyment of visitors. But they want the official Statehood Day to be for the local people, at a time when more people will be free to attend - so not at the height of the tourist season.)

    So this does give us time to potentially do some real-time current event stuff with Turks and Caicos in the next couple of months. We'll see. If anyone else wants to contribute to this, please share your ideas.
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2019 at 12:39 PM
  4. False Dmitri Я хочу пельменей

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    The flag of Watauga

    watauga-flag.png

    Watauga's flag is a combination of two militia flags from the age of the Wars of Independence. Sevier had adopted for his regiment a striped flag based on the model of Virginia. The buff and green colors came from the men's uniforms and were chosen to distinguish the flag from Virginia's red and blue. Other local militia defending the passes into Watauga used a plain blue flag inscribed with the word Liberty. Veterans of these different militia - those who went off to fight in the east versus those that stayed to defend the home front - often ended up as rivals in the postwar years. Combining the two flags symbolized unity among all citizens. The word disappeared in later years, leaving only a plain blue diagonal.

    The flag is affectionately known as "the Sash and Stripes."
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2019 at 8:21 PM
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  5. Gian Wizard of Watkins Mill

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    Hey @False Dmitri, remember your map of Catholic archdioceses/ecclesiatical provinces in the ASB. I was thinking I would also do the same using the 8K-BAM, but wit subdivisions representing the dioceses, kind of like this:

    [​IMG]

    Also, it would make a lot more sense to put Lower Virginia as a diocese under the Archdiocese of Baltimore instead of Wilmington
     
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  6. False Dmitri Я хочу пельменей

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    I literally started that last weekend as a doodle, but didn't save it. That would be great if you did it, or if not, honestly I probably will try it again this weekend.

    Dividing it into bishoprics, like

    I want Maryland to be a separate church province, as a historically Catholic state. LV and Carolina have lower Catholic populations, not enough to warrant an archbishop of their own, but there are separate bishoprics in the different states.
     
  7. Gian Wizard of Watkins Mill

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    I could try ofc. But, I would need the subdivisions of practically every other state at this point.
     
  8. False Dmitri Я хочу пельменей

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    Weird, I left a half sentence. Dividing it into bishoprics, like in the OTL map, would be hard for some but doable for others, is what I was going to say.
     
  9. Gian Wizard of Watkins Mill

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    Also, here's a small update, showing Carolina's ethnic divides:

    Please tell me if this is accurate @False Dmitri (also how to go about doing Watauga and the Civilized Tribes (would they have large African populations on their borders as IOTL)
    [​IMG]
     
  10. False Dmitri Я хочу пельменей

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    Can you clarify why on their borders specifically?

    I'm hesitant to say a lot about the relationship between those tribes and Black people before I've read about the topic in more depth. Some things that I can say for sure:
    • Cherokee's institution of slavery was adopted from Carolina. Compared to the other tribes, there were pretty clear lines between the races. The other four also had African slavery in various forms, but adoption and intermarriage across the racial boundary was comparatively common.
    • On the other hand, there were areas where outsiders obtained or leased land to plant cotton and other crops, and this has resulted in some distinct racial/ethnic communities. People certainly discovered the potential of the "Black Belt" region for growing cotton - or parts of it, at least. Parts of that crescent that are within Muscoguia were leased by Spanish planters, whose slaves left descendants that would be a distinct population today. There might be a similar situation with the Virginians in Chicasaw and Louisianans in Choctaw, but not as extensive.
    • Some pockets of Chicasaw can be considered Virginian and Afro-English. These pockets follow the routes of old settlement trails between the Ohio valley and the Gulf.
    • Chicasaw's main port city is not at Memphis, but the site of OTL Randolph, Tennessee. That would be colored as a diverse city similar to ones you've already done.
    • The capital cities are: Pontotoc, Chicasaw (near Tupelo, Mississippi); Kunsha, Choctaw (in Jasper County, Mississippi); Echota, Cherokee (in Monroe County, Tennessee); Toquebache, Muscoguia (near Tallassee, Alabama); and Calusahachi, Seminol (near Fort Myers, Florida). All are at least mid-sized cities today and have diverse populations. Other than Randolph and the state capitals, I haven't yet discovered the major cities of the region.
    • Ethnic Seminoles define themselves as a mixed, tri-racial people. So most of the state would be a single "Seminol" color regardless of the specific racial admixtures that predominate in the different regions. An exception is the extreme south, which has a lot of Cubans.
    • The ethnic Chicasaw and Choctaw should be colored as closely related; so should the Muscogui and Seminol.
    • Watauga is mostly Piedmonter, with Virginian in the northeast corner and Cherokee in the southeast.
    Those are the admittedly vague and disconnected thoughts that I have right now. I love the work so far.
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2019 at 9:45 PM
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  11. Gian Wizard of Watkins Mill

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    So here's another update:
    [​IMG]
    • Decided to fill in Louisiana, plus some extra bits to indicate the state capitals (even the ones that are practically invisible atm
    • Decided to create two more distinctive African colors for both Afro-Louisianans and the Africans in the Native "Black Belt" that I'll just call the Zambos (IOTL these referred to mixed-race descendants of Africans and Natives). The alternative ofc would be to bring those three together but put them (plus the Gullah, Accomac, and potentially the West Dominican and Black Caribeño people) under a separate "African"* category altogether
    • Some of these borders are basically complete blobs because I don't know where the precise ethnic boundary should go.
    *that is, neither Anglo-Celtic, Gallic, or Hispanic

    I should note though that I kind of adopted the colors used for the Native tribes from the COVFEFE color set
     
  12. Gian Wizard of Watkins Mill

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    Like I said @False Dmitri, I really need those maps showing the ethnic boundaries (particularly for Poutaxia, Ohio, Illinois, East Florida, etc)
     
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