Affiliated States of Boreoamerica thread

Discussion in 'Alternate History Maps and Graphics' started by False Dmitri, Oct 5, 2011.

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  1. False Dmitri Я хочу пельменей

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    It was never majority Mormon, but they're a significant presence especially in the northwestern part of the state. Arques is more Mormon by percentage than any other state, but they're still pretty far from a majority.

    Any reference to the Arques' English speaking population mostly is about Mormons.
     
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  2. False Dmitri Я хочу пельменей

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    Something else that occurs to me: The Mormon settlers no doubt had outsized influence in the mid-19th century, when the province was taking shape. Unlike the Louisianans, they came to the Arques with the expectation and the habits of representative government. So they certainly took the lead in setting up local town meetings and the like, and in demanding a representative assembly at the provincial level.

    Louisiana and Mexico also surveyed the borders, at least in part, with the intent to divide the Mormons among different states, hoping to dilute their future influence. This more or less worked as hoped, and the borders did work to increase factionalism among the Saints, so that today there is no single LDS church but rather multiple competing denominations.
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2019
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  3. terranova210486 Well-Known Member

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    What's the pop culture of this TL like?
     
  4. Undeadmuffin Muffin want to liiiive !

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  5. Gian Wizard of Watkins Mill

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  6. Tsochar Well-Known Member

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    In general I had ASB-verse equivalents produced in the same states they take place in in OTL. So, for example, "That '70s Show" would be a Pays d'en Haut production, since it takes place in eastern Wisconsin. For series that don't take place on earth, or where the location is unclear, I had it be produced where the creator was born.

    Phineas and Ferb takes place in the deliberately-vague Tri-State Area, so we go by where the creator was from. There were two creators: Dan Povenmire and Jeff Marsh; Marsh is from California which is outside ASB territory, so instead we look at Povenmire, who was born in Mobile, Alabama. This puts it as a West Florida production, likely Spanish-language originally, which actually gels nicely with how I characterized the Spanish-speaking areas as pioneers in animated edutainment.

    Gravity Falls takes place in Oregon, which is a PIC protectorate. Its creator, Alex Hirsch, is from the Bay Area, which is in Alta California. Perhaps its counterpart is a foreign show that was picked up for broadcast in the ASB, or maybe it only has a cult following on this side of the continent. I'm not sure what language it would originally be in, since these countries aren't very developed in canon.

    The Loud House is pretty straightforwardly located in Michigan, which puts it in central Pays d'en Haut. Its ASB-version would probably be simulcast in French and English.

    And for fun:

    The Simpsons's creator Matt Groening was from Portland, Oregon, so its counterpart would also be from there. Similarly to how Springfield is not in any one state, I'm imagining a series where the setting could be in any town in ASB-verse Oregon, with characters of any ethnicity, speaking any language; the characters have bright skin colors and their names are ethnically-ambiguous, and all on-screen text is made-up gibberish with subtitles in whatever language it's being broadcast in. It's quite clever, but its cultural references don't translate well to ASB audiences.

    The Airbender-verse shows are created by Michael DiMartino, from Vermont, and Bryan Konietzko, from California, so it would be originally produced in New England (I think Vermont would be a bit small to maintain a whole homegrown animation industry, so I'm thinking animation in New England is all based around Boston)

    Family Guy, similarly, would be a New England production, taking place as it does in Rhode Island. American Dad! and The Cleveland Show, by coincidence, both take place in Virginia, so maybe the ASB-verse counterpart of Seth McFarlane had a dispute with his production company and set up shop with one located in Lower Virginia.

    Johnny Bravo takes place in Aaron City which isn't located anywhere in particular but is named after Elvis Presley's middle name, so I'd associate it with Memphis and make it a Chickasaw production, maybe in partnership with Muscogia, Choctaw, and Cherokee companies as an ill-fated attempt to make a national-scale, Native-oriented animation studio. It would originally be a satire of stereotypical young Anglos who move to Native-majority areas and strut around like they own the place. This subtext would be lost on wider audiences, but it becomes popular all the same and loses the satire angle completely when a larger company buys the rights to it.

    Rick & Morty's creators Harmon and Roiland are from Wisconsin and California, respectively, so I'd put it in Pays-d'en-Haut
    Ed, Edd, n Eddy was created by Danny Antonucci, who is from Toronto; this puts it as a Huronian production.

    Cape Comics:
    Superman and Batman, in one version of DC canon, are located on opposite sides of Delaware Bay, both of which are in Christiana, so my headcanon (of course, everything in this post is headcanon) is that cape comics got started there, but spread further by mid-century, and today the various animated series are mostly produced in New Amsterdam. Superman was based in part on circus performers of the era, and Batman was based on Zorro, an earlier pulp fiction vigilante; I'm thinking comic books started as adaptations of various legends from around the ASB; at one point, a few of them are written into modern stories as heroes and villains, and the subgenre explodes in popularity. Instead of being given powers by alien technology or science experiments gone awry, most capes TTL get their powers from ancient spirits and other supernatural sources.
    Popular cape heroes in the ASB-verse:
    Ragnar, King of Vinland- an ancient Viking chieftain who ruled over the settlers in Newfoundland, but was put to sleep by a magic spell and awakened in modern times, now fights crime in Cristiana (compare Thor, Leif Eriksson)
    Mothman- A Lower Virginian man who, inspired by moths, creates a flying suit that allows him to fly but only at night, using it to fight crime (Compare Batman, Mothman)
    Jalapoy- The direct descendant of an enslaved African king, his family cultivates a magic root that gives him the power to shape-shift, which he uses to fight crime in the Carolinan ghettoes. (Compare Black Panther, John the Conqueror)
    Misty Maiden- A Native woman who discovered a thunder god's power behind a waterfall. Has become the go-to character for female empowerment (Compare Maid of the Mist, Wonder Woman)
    The Corsair- A Native boat captain in the Age of Sail whose ship has magic sails that let him sail underwater and through the skies, fighting pirates and sea monsters whle keeping his rowdy crew in check. (compare Captain Stormalang, Aquaman)
    Jean Grand, the giant woodsman- A woodsman who fights demons and monsters in remote Quebec with a bear companion and the supernatural ability to grow giant. Fell out of popularity for several decades, but revitalized in recent works as an environmentalist figure (compare Paul Banyan, Apache Chief)
    Kaplata- A regional heroine popular mainly in West Dominica and Lower Louisiana, who calls spirits to fight evil. Has an iconic snake companion. (Compare Mama Wata)
     
  7. terranova210486 Well-Known Member

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    What would Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Angel be like? Or Firefly?
     
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  8. terranova210486 Well-Known Member

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    Was Futurama made ITTL?
     
  9. Tsochar Well-Known Member

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    Buffy and Angel take place in Southern California; Sunnyvale being near Santa Barbara and Angel being in Los Angeles. Firefly, being heavily inspired by Westerns, would also be out of place, as the ASB didn't have a Wild West. Joss's other show, Dollhouse, also took place in LA, so the ASB-verse Whedon would probably be Californian and likely unknown within the ASB.
    That begs the question, what is California's movie industry like? The country is several kinds of dysfunctional, so it might be that the individual Californian states have fledgling film but aren't able to attract much foreign expertise or capital, so they're forced to produce shows and movies on a shoestring budget.

    Futurama takes place in New New York, in the same place as old New York, but Groening as mentioned before is not from there; since the Simpsons predates it, I'm more inclined to put them both in Oregon. Futurama was inspired by the retrofuturistic fad of the mid-20th century, which was itself very much a product of the USA's rapid industrialization and advancement into a world power. Oregon doesn't have the same background, so it's doubtful it would be the same show. Instead, maybe it would have a more surrealist take on the future. Maybe Oregonian TV in general is just really weird.
     
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  10. Gian Wizard of Watkins Mill

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    Okay, but how would the characters be any different (or something like it) when it comes to the differing background?
     
  11. False Dmitri Я хочу пельменей

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    Now what is the closest equivalent to the Western within the ASB? Probably the old Leatherstocking stories, right? With New Netherland being so influential, I can imagine that Leatherstocking tropes could be familiar enough to translate them into outer space.

    It's also worth asking whether the West - our West as a region, the land beyond the ASB - served as the setting for any stories. Certainly it was a land of lawlessness and adventure, so some of the Western ethos from OTL could apply. What's missing is Manifest Destiny and the civilizing mission that lurks in the background of most Westerns.

    California in OTL first attracted film studios because it's got a nice climate that let film crews work outside throughout the year. While that's certainly true in TTL, the instability of the area, especially during the key early years of film, would prevent anything like our Hollywood from growing up there. @Turquoise Blue and I have said some brief things about Californian culture, but there is nothing like an international movie industry there, that's for sure.

    Let's say that Oregon in general is known for just generally being "weird". It's a nice point of contact between OTL stereotypes and the TTL situation.
     
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  12. False Dmitri Я хочу пельменей

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    Quite unexpectedly, I've written another state history. Here it is.

    República de Dominica Oriental
    Republic of East Dominica
    eastdominica.png

    East Dominica comprises the eastern, Spanish-speaking half of the island of Saint Dominic. As the New World's first colony, it has a long and eventful history. Its relationship with the other states has been complex and often strained, beginning with its conquest by veterans of the West Dominican slave revolution.

    HISTORY
    1. Foundation

    Christopher Columbus landed on St. Dominic on his first voyage and established a colony on his second. The modern state of East Dominica traces its origin to Columbus's settlement of 1493 and honors the famed admiral as its founder. On that and later voyages, Columbus also set the colonial pattern of enslaving and terrorizing the inhabitants. Over the next several years, thousands and thousands of Taínos died, many of them, if accounts are to be believed, in mass suicides provoked by the misery of Spanish rule. In recent years the state has grappled with its founder's complicated legacy; but for all the violence, East Dominicans can be rather defensive about Columbus. He remains their founder, after all, and they will always be proud to belong to the hemisphere's oldest colony.

    Under Columbus's brother Bartolomé and son Diego, and subsequent governors, the reign of brutality continued. African slaves now joined the Taínos in the mines, plantations, and, after escaping, out in the hills. But the Spanish built as well as destroyed. Bartolomé founded the capital, Santo Domingo, in 1496. Fifteen years later the city held a bishopric; less than twenty years after that, a university. The island was becoming the center of a new colonial civilization.

    2. Spanish rule

    Despite Santo Domingo's early importance, when Spain conquered new empires in Mexico and Peru, they quickly surpassed it. Around mid-century it also lost its position as gateway to the New World when Spain shifted its sea traffic to Havana. This killed the island's nascent sugar industry as planters moved to Havana to be close to shipping. Santo Domingo became a backwater. Its people made a living mainly through cattle ranching, selling the hides to the richer colonies.

    The decline changed the colony's people and culture. The slower pace and the poverty meant that colonial rule became less heavy-handed. The free communities of Black and Indian outlaws mixed more freely with the White population, so that within a few generations, most Dominicans had ancestry from all three races.

    The same conditions also turned the Dominicans toward smuggling. French, Dutch and English ships visited the smaller settlements all around the coast to buy and sell contraband. These interactions would eventually lead to the French takeover of the western part of the island. The Spanish government tried to stop the illicit trade by destroying all the settlements of the north coast, but this only accelerated the process because foreign buccaneers were now free to roam the abandoned areas. Planters and soldiers followed the pirates. By the late 1600s, West Dominica was largely French and was organized as a new colony, Saint-Domingue.

    Unlike Spain, France invested heavily in its colony and greatly expanded sugar cultivation. The French population was almost four times the Spanish in 1790 despite covering less territory. The overwhelming majority of those people were slaves. Their revolt shook and finally toppled Spanish rule in Saint Dominic after three hundred years, in the process tying the east to the Boreoamerican states.

    3. Occupation

    Just as the French Revolution sparked war all across Europe, the slave revolt in West Dominica quickly grew into a wider war. The Spanish in the east attacked first, badly outnumbered but contemptuous of their opponents. Their invasion failed, and shortly afterward free Maroon communities in the east invited the revolutionaries to launch a counterattack. The westerners had both ideological and practical reasons for invading the east. They wanted to spread their revolution and free the Spanish slaves; but their revolt had also destroyed much of their colony's infrastructure, and they hoped that conquering the east would give them land and resources to help them recover.

    Importantly for both halves of the island, the Dominican revolutionaries still maintained links to the French Republic. While radicals held power in France, they got along well with the Dominicans. More conservative regimes, like that of the Bonapartes, had a more strained relationship. But the island stayed connected to France throughout the revolutionary era. In the occupied eastern colony, French soldiers and administrators were needed to keep control. Though the entire island of Saint Dominic was nominally a single colony, in reality the west functioned as a independent republic, while the east was ruled by French officials.

    Spain did not give up on its colony right away. It sent several expeditions to Santo Domingo and set up a rival government with the cooperation of local loyalists. But Spain's stated intention to restore slavery doomed these efforts because it allowed the French to keep acting as liberators. In the end Spain signed away its oldest colony in a treaty, but it left behind a large group of supporters who resented the French occupation.

    In 1810, the entire island was placed under the Kingdom of New France, a new colonial federation to be ruled by the emperor's brother Jerome. Canadians now began to replace the European French in occupied East Dominica, the start of a close connection between Canada and East Dominica that would last for decades. Canada had followed France and Saint-Domingue in abolishing slavery in the 1790s, and now its merchants were quite willing to seek opportunities to trade with the island. Plans continued to fully unite east and west; this never happened for fear of a revolt by the Spanish-speaking population. Instead, New French policy in this period focused on giving East Dominica just enough autonomy to placate the citizens, encouraging the maintenance of Spanish language and culture.

    The Occupation era saw major reforms and investment in East Dominica's agriculture. Sugar, tobacco, and coffee were planted in large quantities for the first time in a century and a half. New France tried various models for managing the land and people. In some areas, abandoned estates were broken up to create smallholdings for freedmen and maroons. In other places plantations were kept intact and switched to wage or tenant labor rather than slavery. Not every scheme succeeded, and Dominicans complained that too much of the profit they generated ended up in Canada, but overall this growth did a lot to improve the material condition of the state.

    4. Statehood

    The Kingdom of New France collapsed as soon as news arrived that the French Empire was no more. Everyone knew that French control of East Dominica was just as precarious. Liberals longed to break free of colonial control and set up a republic. Another group, known as the Legitimists, wanted to return to Spanish rule. The Legitimists were to be the major conservative faction in East Dominica for nearly a century, even after the dream of monarchy was long past. They represented Spanish over French, monarchy over republicanism, White and Mestizo interests over Black, separation over Affiliation, traditional Dominicano culture over Boreoamerican cosmopolitanism. As the French imperial system was falling apart, the Legitimists prepared to fight the Liberals for control over East Dominica's new government.

    Canada, eager to protect its economic influence, strongly opposed a Spanish restoration on the island. So did other Boreoamerican states that had begun to take advantage of freer trade with the island. Just before the political fight came to blows, the Canadian government brokered a compromise between the two sides. East Dominica would be a monarchy, but rather than restore the Spanish king, it would find another Catholic prince willing to come and rule. The Dominicans made the offer to Antonio, Count of Busseto, brother of the Duke of Parma. He was distantly related to the kings of Spain, which it was thought might confer some legitimacy. Antonio arrived in 1834 with his family to be crowned Prince of "Dominica Española."

    The Principality was the kind of compromise that nobody really likes. Legitimists still hoped for a real restoration, while liberals wanted a republic. Prince Antonio was also a complete outsider in East Dominica, so earning a devoted following was difficult. The situation would have been a challenge for the most gifted statesman. Antonio deserves credit for competently keeping the state stable and preventing a civil war, but he was never an inspirational leader. By the 1840s there were plots against him. While the Prince and his wife were off the island, the Liberal majority in the legislature staged a coup and declared a republic. Canadian officials, informed of the plot beforehand, saw to it that the prince's children were taken to safety and worked to gain support for the new regime in the other states. By now enthusiasm for the Spanish crown had waned, so despite some support among the Church and the landowning class, the Legitimists lacked the strength to fight back. The revolution was accomplished almost without bloodshed.

    The new republic made many symbolic changes. The name of the state changed from "Spanish" to "East" Dominica. Under the Principality, the state had adopted a horizontal tricolor flag in Spanish colors to appeal to Legitimists; now it was rotated into a vertical tricolor to represent the Republic. The three colors were re-interpreted to represent the three ships of Columbus: gold for the Santa María, white for the Niña, red for the Pinta.

    While the idea of monarchy was off the table for good, the Legitimists remained an active political party, controlling the government many times over the ensuing decades. The political fights shifted to other areas. One was the question of Affiliation. Liberals, with their backers in the Francophone states and worldly outlook, favored closer ties with the other states. Legitimists were more wary of the growing power of the confederal institutions. East Dominica has always had a strong separatist movement, and in the nineteenth century this movement was decidedly conservative and traditionalist.

    5. Twentieth and twenty-first centuries

    Economic changes came to East Dominica as the nineteenth century ended. New, less labor-intensive methods for refining sugar, introduced during the imperial era, now became universal, transforming the industry that had been synonymous with misery since slave times. Cacao became a major crop. Mining and manufacturing also began to grow, but very slowly. East Dominica in 1900 was still an agricultural society, but one that was part of an industrializing world. A growing need for labor was met by new immigrants, many of them from the Canary Islands and Italy.

    East Dominica's politics reshuffled as the controversies of the nineteenth century faded. Legitimism had held on for quite a while after the end of the monarchy, but it was losing its luster. Much of the movement's energy found an outlet in a new Hispanic populism that took shape starting in the 1920s or 30s. This broad-based movement, today represented by the Partido Colombiano, captured the spirit of the old loyalists in its resentment of mainland politicians and its praise of Hispano-American culture. But unlike them, it acknowledged the ASB as a generally good thing and sought to work within the confederal institutions to amplify "la voz hispana." As this was largely a movement in confederal politics, it won adherents among all parties at the state level.

    Separatism again gained momentum around mid-century. This time, it appeared among the political left. They pointed out that East Dominica only belonged to the ASB due to armed conquest followed by economic domination by the mainland - domination which, they said, never really ended. This took place in a context where tourism was becoming a major industry. Dominicans now saw privileged mainlanders ignorant of their culture tromping all over their island. The new separatists worked within existing left-wing parties until the 1990s, when they split off to form a new party. East Dominica is not the only state with a separatist party, but its Partido Kiskeiano has more seats in the state legislature than any other. A successful vote for statehood in Turks and Caicos in 2018 has given new energy to the movement, who see it as a model for achieving their own change in status. Secession seems unlikely for now, but the sentiment is an established part of East Dominica's political landscape.

    Formed in a crucible of violence and slavery, East Dominica's history and culture continue to captivate. From its distant corner of the Confederation, the state continues to debate the meaning of the union and to seek its place among its peers.

    ______________________________________________________________________
    For those of you keeping count, I'm very nearly done with the state-by-state histories that have been the bread and butter of this thread since I started. I only count six states left, here they are in order of how much has been done already:
    • Cuba: It's surprising how difficult Cuba has been. @Turquoise Blue and I wrote a lot of content on it like eight million years ago, but never shared it publicly because it was never finished. A lot of it focused on the free Maroon communities and that was interesting, but there was nothing to bring that forward to the present. I've tried to learn more about the place since then. Two years ago, when some friends and I planned a winter vacation, I even steered us toward Cuba partly (mostly?) so I could find material. (I didn't mention my motives at the time.) The problem has been that Cuba's history is almost too weird. For every other state, I've been able to grab something from its history or culture to use as a center, and build the TTL story around that. Cuba hasn't provided that yet.
    • Watauga: I (or anyone else, really) could probably cobble together a general history of Watauga from pieces of already-posted material. I don't want to do that until I have at least a map or flag to post along with it. This is the Maps and Graphics forum, after all.
    • Turks and Caicos: In universe, the islands achieved statehood last summer. I had vague plans to write it as a real-time news event, then scaled down to an in-universe magazine article, and right now it's not much more than a photo essay. I guess that might be enough to share, but I've had writers' block for months when it came to writing the article.
    • Choctaw: I need to generally deepen my knowledge of the Five Civilized Tribes. Those that already have content (Muscoguia, Seminol, Cherokee) are mostly written with a European/colonial focus, with a lot to say about the tribes' relations with the colonial states, but not much else. Choctaw had some kind of tributary relationship with Louisiana, but I want to read a lot more before I write about it so that I can do justice to the culture.
    • Chicasaw: Same as Choctaw but even more so.
    • Dakota: Right now I have absolutely nothing. A year ago, my brother moved to a place within the area of Dakota, and every time I visit I apologize for not having anything on it.
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2019
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  13. False Dmitri Я хочу пельменей

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    I've made a new locator map by shrinking @Gian's 8K-BAM. To show it off, here's a map showing the descriptors used in the states' official names, TTL's take on the One Federation Limit.

    names-new.png
     
  14. False Dmitri Я хочу пельменей

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    Here is a map of Watauga and its counties. Towns and history will come later, but this is ready to post.

    watauga map complete.png

    (edit) For @Gian - I know you're interested in adding the subdivisions to the 8k-BAM, so here is one that is maybe easier to trace.
    watauga map counties.png
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2019
  15. Gian Wizard of Watkins Mill

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    Luckily I still have the PSD file so doing that tomorrow shouldn't be a stretch.
     
  16. Gian Wizard of Watkins Mill

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  17. Threadmarks: Watauga

    False Dmitri Я хочу пельменей

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    Here's Watauga's history and finished map. It's both longer and sooner than I expected - once I started to graft the State of Franklin's history onto the ASB, it was hard to stop. There's still no flag, but to make up for it, this is the first proper state map in a good long while.

    watauga map complete.png

    Watauga is a small English-speaking state perched in the Allegheny mountains and along the rivers that flow down to the west. Originally a breakaway piece of Carolina, Watauga won and kept its independence by fighting fiercely for it; in this way its history can be compared to its fellow inland settler states of Vermont and Upper Connecticut. But while it began as an aggressive spearhead of English civilization, Wataugan culture has also been influenced very much by its Cherokee neighbors. As a small, poor state, it has sometimes struggled to find its voice in the halls of power, but its people remain proud to call themselves its citizens.

    History
    Founding the Watauga settlements (1760-1770)

    The main route between Upper and Lower Virginia passes through northern Watauga, so the first English to come into the area were Virginian hunters and trappers going to the Ohio valley. By the 1760s many Virginian and Carolian people were looking to plant settlements west of the mountains. This violated England's treaties with the Cherokee, so the people who moved in tended to be tough, self-sufficient types with a low opinion of the monarchy and the law. Late in the decade, some of the settlers along the Watauga River formed an association to govern their own affairs and negotiate with local Cherokee leaders. While it did not yet declare itself a state, the Watauga Association marks the start of what today is the State of Watauga.

    The founders of Watauga at first were coy on the question of staying loyal to England. But as the 1760s stretched into the 70s, this neutrality became impossible to keep up. Virginia had declared independence and Carolina confirmed its loyalty. All along the backcountry, republicans and loyalists fought bitterly in what had grown into a bloody civil war. The Wataugan settlers by and large sympathized with the republicans. Citizens invited republican refugees to come to the territory, knowing they would need the manpower if the war should come west. Wataugans also sought to make inroads among disaffected members of the Catawba tribe. The Catawbas were mostly firm allies of England, but a few young and ambitious members were enticed by the offer: full rights as citizens rather than a protected status as wards of the Crown.

    The Wars of Independence (1770-1785)

    John Sevier now became the leader of the movement for independence. Sevier was a landowner who came to Watauga shortly after the Association was organized and soon won election as a magistrate. In the early 1770s he raised a unit of men to join Virginia's fight against England and Carolina. At his urging, the assembly finally declared independence and soon after named him governor of the now-state. Military matters occupied most of Sevier's long tenure as governor. Typical of the rough, violent leaders who rose to prominence during this era, he not only attacked Carolian troops, but led raids on the homes of prominent loyalists closer to home, as well as Cherokee villages to the west.

    Sevier's administration also made diplomatic gains. Despite having served under Virginian command in the army, he resisted all attempts by Virginia to exert control over his new state. Sevier had fortifications built where the road between the Virginias crossed Wataugan territory, thereby to discourage his ally from trying to annex the territory. These forts eventually became the city of Freeport.

    Meanwhile, Watauga took advantage of disunity among the Cherokee. Judge James White went as an envoy to the Cherokee towns along the Little Tanasi River, closest to the Watauga settlements. The community there had historically been dominant within the nation but had recently been eclipsed by others; and its chiefs were weary of the long war against England's enemies. White managed to win a separate peace treaty with the chiefs there, drawing a border near the Little Tanasi but not encroaching on the main towns. In exchange, Watauga made the same offer that it had made the Catawba: in return for living in Watauga, obeying its laws and serving on the militia, Cherokee people could live as citizens with full civil rights. Virginia was also seeking Cherokee immigrants to help settle its western territory - the so-called "Virginia Cherokee" who today mostly live in Ohio - but Virginia's concessions to the Indians did not go nearly as far as Watauga's. In this way a state founded by violent Indian fighters adopted the most enlightened indigenous policy of all the English-speaking states.

    The Tanasi Treaty concluded right as Wataugans were meeting to draft a constitution. The state did not yet have a proper one, only a set of ad hoc agreements that sitting leaders had made without submitting them to a vote of the people. In their convention at the Nolichucky County courthouse, delegates considered some quite radical proposals for a new democratic charter. Many of these ideas found their way into the constitution, mostly in weakened form. All men were granted the vote regardless of property, but the governor and highest officials still needed to own land. Lawyers and others with education were thankfully not prohibited from serving in government, but religious ministers still were, a secularist provision that remains in effect today. Governor Sevier, a major landowner himself, argued against such changes but accepted the constitution when it was passed and ratified. The "Nolichucky Constitution" placed Watauga in the vanguard of democratic government.

    The constitution called for a new legislature immediately but gave Sevier two more years to act as governor. MIlitary considerations again occupied much of this time. He had more blockhouses built in the valley of the upper French Broad River, the area that today is the most densely populated part of the state but in the 1780s was an empty no-man's-land between Watauga and Carolina. Sevier remained active in the militia after stepping down. His obstinate, often brutal leadership had kept the state independent despite enormous pressures from all directions. Nevertheless, he had learned to be flexible in order to guarantee the state's security or unity, as his actions with the Cherokee treaty and the new constitution show.

    Continental alliances (1785-1840)

    The governors who succeeded Sevier knew that Watauga could not stay independent through force alone. In the next few decades Watauga emerged as a leading voice for continental alliance.

    Cherokee people began to come in greater numbers in the 1790s. The legislature set aside land for village and individual plots along the upper French Broad valley, calling it Agiqua County after the Cherokee name for that stretch of the river. Other counties were carved out of the rugged country around it as they became populated, mostly with Cherokee and other Indian or Mixed settlers eking out a living from the hillsides.

    Most Wataugans had warily listened to Virginia's calls for greater unity among the English republics, sensing a plot to take over their state. They had the same initial reaction to the first efforts to hold Congresses of all the English states. But Watauga's second governor, Andrew Caldwell, realized that the Congresses could help his state win wider recognition of its independence. He named delegates to the Second Congress of Cambridge, Maryland, in 1786, marking the start of Watauga's participation in confederal politics.

    In 1803 war broke out again between Virginia and England, and Watauga had no choice but to join the Virginian side. It was caught between two enemies, Cherokee and Carolina, and relied on Virginia for essential military supplies. Wataugan soldiers away on campaign again found themselves mostly under Virginian commanders. But closer to home, Wataugans were able to hold their own in the tough guerrilla fights that they needed to wage in defending their passes and villages. They managed to hold the border so that when peace was declared, the state kept all the land it occupied. Watauga and Carolina signed the Treaty of Camden in 1810, some time after the end of the fighting. The treaty finally established normal relations between them, leaving Watauga free to develop in peace.

    The person of David Crockett rose to prominence in the postwar years as one of the continent's foremost diplomats. Beginning with regular missions to the Cherokee, Crockett's career took him all over the territory between the Ohio and the Gulf of Mexico. He met with the colonial governors of Carolina, East Florida, and Louisiana and with leading chiefs from all the major Indian nations.

    Crockett's vision was of a region where the different nations lived together in peace, where the colonial powers ceased to use the inland tribes as tools as they jockeyed for power. As his reputation grew, he was called to act as a mediator in all kinds of disputes, as in 1818 when he led the talks that ended decades of hostility between the Chicasaw and the French. Active in the developing confederal institutions, he became the first man from an English state to sit in the Congress of the Indies, a body of French and Spanish leaders in the Gulf region, and was the first Wataugan to be given a seat on the Grand Council, a post he held for life.

    More than any specific agreement, Crockett's Treaties, seen as a whole, helped improve the political climate in the region, making peaceful relations both possible and expected. They set the stage for the south's gradual integration with the northern and Caribbean states. For this reason Wataugans will often claim that the entire ASB was their idea. Half the states of the confederation make the same claim, but it is important to note the contributions of Crockett and other Wataugan diplomats during this crucial era.

    Freedom and commerce (1810-1890)

    Early Watauga was a slave society. The land is not suitable for the big plantations that perpetuated slave labor elsewhere, but in this cash-poor society, slaves played a role as a store of wealth and sign of status. Records show that human beings were regularly used to buy land, settle court cases, and provide dowries in Watauga. In the process the state government became a significant slaveholder and often included its chattels in its annual payments to the Cherokee Nation.

    The growth of a money economy undermined slavery's economic importance. This happened very slowly. Improved roads over the mountains increased trade and brought in coins from Virginia and Carolina. During the war Watauga's government officially adopted Virginian currency to help it pay its expenses. Afterward it established a mint of its own. A shortage of precious metals led it to establish a state bank a few years later so it could begin issuing notes.

    Trade to the west developed as Cherokee's economy grew more complex and the settlements along the Ohio grew. Whitesville, located at the Forks of the Tanasi, became a major shipping center and Watauga's first city.

    The same traffic brought new settlers to Watauga, among them a significant number of Quakers and others from Pennsylvania and New Netherland. They joined an existing community of Quakers who had won some converts among Watauga's Indian and Mixed population. As the Quakers increased in number they began to push for an end to slavery in the state. The movement gained momentum in Watauga's populist political culture. The state assembly started to regularly debate the slavery question in the early 1830s. In 1838 it passed a bill for gradual emancipation.

    A railroad was laid from Whitesville over the mountains to Virginia in the mid-1860s, opening the way to still more trade. The railroad spurred an increase in manufacturing. Among other things, Boreoamerica was developing a taste for Watauga whiskey.

    It's worth taking a moment to talk about the geography of Boreoamerican whiskey making. Scots-Irish settlers coming to the mountains in the 18th century usually get the credit for introducing the art to the region. By the early 19th century many of their English and Indian neighbors had also learned distilling and regional styles had begun to distinguish themselves. The first to achieve popularity came from the state of Allegheny and was distilled from a mash of corn and rye. Known as Monongahela, this whiskey became known throughout the west and out into the Great Plains. Mexican homesteaders took the style and made it their own, changing the name to "Angela." To the south, Upper Virginian distillers used a pure corn mash to make a sweeter style called Cantucky. South of that, Watauga distillers experimented with an elaborately slow filtration process to mellow and clarify their product. The continent's growing rail network ensured that Watauga whiskey began to appear all over. Today, it's fair to say that many people around the world enjoy a glass of "Watauga" having never heard of the state.

    The town of Taliqua, founded as the main Cherokee settlement in southern Watauga, grew quickly in the age of rail. Textile and other factories appeared in the town and other parts of the valley. This growth diluted the indigenous character of the city, though the rural population all around remained largely Cherokee and remain so today.

    Persistent poverty and signs of recovery (1890-present)

    For all this, Watauga overall remained a poor mountain state. As the twentieth century turned, a significant portion of its people still relied on subsistence farming. Like mountain communities everywhere, Watauga often felt isolated despite its road and rail connections to the outside world. Many families lived much as their ancestors had in the previous century, seemingly overlooked by progress.

    Despite these difficulties, Watauga was known for its rich culture. It was sometimes called in these years "the poorest of the English states," but it had many things in common with the Indian and Mixed states of Boreoamerica's interior - close to the land and to the family. Its English mountain culture had taken many Cherokee elements. Watauga music, for example, is related to mountain music in other parts of the Alleghenies, but with the addition of a strong drum beat due to Cherokee influence. Rural parts of the state's southern counties continued to speak Cherokee even while the main towns switched to English.

    As economic troubles worsened in the early 20th century, Watauga turned to the confederal government for aid. Massive hydroelectricity projects brought electricity to most communities for the first time, but also destroyed many villages and farms. Other grants helped the state with bridges and other infrastructure. Today the state continues to rely on confederal support to stay afloat.

    In the later twentieth century, nature-based tourism revived the fortunes of some communities in Watauga. The scenic Broad French valley attracted some of Carolina's elite to build vacation homes. Other vacationers were drawn to outdoor sporting in the forests and the new man-made lakes. These new opportunities provided incentive to conserve land, and the government organized new state parks and forests. Today Watauga has one of the highest percentages of protected land of any state in the ASB. Tourism has not solved the problem of poverty in Watauga, but it has provided a new source of income. Wataugans are fighters, and whatever happens with their economic future, rest assured they'll keep fighting.
     
  18. Dante Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2009
    Location:
    The Independent City-State of Chicago
    Great update, keep up the great work. It makes me wonder, with the ASB never going through a Prohibition the alcohol in the ASB is probably way more regional and varied. In our TL Prohibition shut down a lot of local, small historic breweries and distilleries (my favorite whiskey bar has a framed poster of all of the whiskey distilleries sadly "lost to prohibition") So drinking local is probably way more popular with brands like Budweiser or Jack Daniels never reaching that cross country popularity that they enjoy today. I know you made one of those "stereotype maps" separating the country into their most popular adult beverage of choice, have you given any further thought to the subject.
     
  19. False Dmitri Я хочу пельменей

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2008
    Location:
    The Greatest Lakes
    Here is a discussion from a while back.

    So you're absolutely right, the history of temperance and prohibition in the ASB is one of a patchwork of local laws rather than a broad national movement. It seems unlikely to have been a major movement in the Catholic states. Urban areas were less likely to ban alcohol than rural ones, since the problem of drinking instead of working was associated with self-employed farmers more than people who worked "on the clock." Indian states were likely to have specific concerns with alcohol abuse that echo what we have seen in OTL, but the situation is not exactly the same, since Native culture did not experience the devastation and collapse that we know from our world.

    The original idea of Temperance involved individual people taking a pledge not to drink, or even to just drink in moderation. Legally banning alcohol came later. That original concept certainly was popular in the past of TTL, and it would fit the general feel of the world to say that it continues to have an influence today - that TTL's version of AA built on the existing Temperance movement with updated methods, rather than present itself as something totally new.

    So, the states most likely to have enacted liquor bans of some kind are those that were mostly rural and under the influence of English religion. Those could include Cherokee, Chicasaw, Upper Connecticut, Upper Virginia, Vermont, New Hampshire, St. John's Island, and New Scotland. The eastern provinces of Ohio, the Sandusky and Ashkany Countries of the Upper Country, western Upper Louisiana and northwestern Arques are also likely contenders. So is Watauga... the issue there is that whiskey was such a key part of its economy. It was a contentious debate. Some counties certainly declared themselves dry. But the state as a whole did not, and the distilling industry did not come to a stop.
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2019
    Tyche likes this.
  20. fernerdave on the boat now

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2008
    Location:
    My name is Yon Yonsin, I now live in Visconsin
    Sevier and Crockett but no Houston? Also, have you heard of the pig drives? In OTL folks would drive their herds of pigs over the mountains to sell in the east (or Cincinnatti or Chicago).
     
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