Affiliated States of Boreoamerica thread

A while back, I posted a map of my home region, Kènojé Country in the Upper Country, that was surprising in how it managed to be both ugly and inaccurate. Here is a better version of that map.

kenoje.png
 
Last edited:
Looks good. What are the darker green subdivisions? Towns?

The entire thing is divided into municipalities. The municipalities of Kènojé, Racine and Waukegan have a special status as the chief cities.

The six Regions are administrative and judicial; they have no separate governments per se. The forty-ish municipalities are the main subdivisions of the country. Other constituents of the Upper Country, especially the bigger ones, no doubt have more robust district, regional, or county governments.
 
Last edited:
Nice! The idea that the internal structure of each state or even sub-states is different because of historical reasons is somewhat horrifying for the ability to govern the nation. But it's also very interesting to look at!
 
A while back, I posted a map of my home region, Kènojé Country in the Upper Country, that was surprising in how it managed to be both ugly and inaccurate. Here is a better version of that map.

Does the Kènojé Country by any chance have a town called the French equivalent of "Point Place"?
 
Does the Kènojé Country by any chance have a town called the French equivalent of "Point Place"?

I'm a little embarrassed to have missed that. Yes, that point north of Racine should obviously be a separate municipality by that name. My French is rudimentary, so I'm unsure what sounds the most natural: Pointe Place, Pointe de Place, Pointe de la Place... Can any real French speakers help? Once I have a name I'll post an updated map.
 
I'm a little embarrassed to have missed that. Yes, that point north of Racine should obviously be a separate municipality by that name. My French is rudimentary, so I'm unsure what sounds the most natural: Pointe Place, Pointe de Place, Pointe de la Place... Can any real French speakers help? Once I have a name I'll post an updated map.

I think "place" more commonly means "plaza," and "endroit" might be used instead.

L'endroit-au-Pointe might be one translation, being literally "place [location] at the point [promontory]"
 
I think "place" more commonly means "plaza," and "endroit" might be used instead.

L'endroit-au-Pointe might be one translation, being literally "place [location] at the point [promontory]"

Place is used more abstractly as well, something like "space" or "room". And that point looks like a sort of round table of land sticking out from below a line of bl
I think "place" more commonly means "plaza," and "endroit" might be used instead.

L'endroit-au-Pointe might be one translation, being literally "place [location] at the point [promontory]"

It still could be a conceivable name, maybe if the point was used as a marketplace at one time or something. (It's a fairly wide table of land, not a craggy rock or anything.) But if that doesn't seem plausible in French, I can go with that translation using Endroit.
 
L'endroit-au-Pointe

It would be "L'endroit-à-la-Pointe". If you need any help with French, feel free to ask (expect mainland French though). But I wouldn't use that, really.

If I understand correctly, this "point" is a rocky outcropping. I would use "L'éperon" then. It means exactly that.
 
It would be "L'endroit-à-la-Pointe". If you need any help with French, feel free to ask (expect mainland French though). But I wouldn't use that, really.

If I understand correctly, this "point" is a rocky outcropping. I would use "L'éperon" then. It means exactly that.

Thank you! It's a low, sandy spot, so Pointe is fine. I posted the updated map.
 
Place is used more abstractly as well, something like "space" or "room". And that point looks like a sort of round table of land sticking out from below a line of bl


It still could be a conceivable name, maybe if the point was used as a marketplace at one time or something. (It's a fairly wide table of land, not a craggy rock or anything.) But if that doesn't seem plausible in French, I can go with that translation using Endroit.

I should have known better than to trust my instincts where French gender agreements are involved.
 
I mostly just lurk but I just wanted to say I enjoy this tl a lot. It's weird seeing such a small scale ah map based on where I'm from (I live in Chicago now but I grew up in Roundlake, Park City, and Gurnee)
 
This is another map I have been slowly playing with for the last few months. Language map of the Upper Country.

There are some name changes in this map compared to the last one I posted here. I have kept tinkering with this map almost since I posted it as "finished", but have not shared every small change I made.

BENXqAN.png


I mostly just lurk but I just wanted to say I enjoy this tl a lot. It's weird seeing such a small scale ah map based on where I'm from (I live in Chicago now but I grew up in Roundlake, Park City, and Gurnee)

Local histories are some of the most interesting. This is the only completed local map that I have posted, because I live there. But I've done rough ones for a few other spots.
 
Last edited:
This is another map I have been slowly playing with for the last few months. Language map of the Upper Country.

There are some name changes in this map compared to the last one I posted here. I have kept tinkering with this map almost since I posted it as "finished", but have not shared every small change I made.

Not gonna lie. I've been definitely wanting to see more state-level language maps ever since you map the one for Christina! And you certainly did not disappoint!

Out of curiosity, are any more language maps planned for the near future and are there any "hard numbers" on the actual linguistic demographics like what percentage of the Upper Country speaks French, Anishinaabe, etc?
 
Not gonna lie. I've been definitely wanting to see more state-level language maps ever since you map the one for Christina! And you certainly did not disappoint!

Out of curiosity, are any more language maps planned for the near future and are there any "hard numbers" on the actual linguistic demographics like what percentage of the Upper Country speaks French, Anishinaabe, etc?

Thank you! And there is a lot happening with Christiana right now. It turns out that the state is both more influential and more interesting than I had imagined. The text isn't ready to post yet, but the outline is on my site. http://karnell.weebly.com/christiana.html

As for numbers, I have to confess that I hate doing them. It's not how I like to write. Majority/Plurality is as detailed as I feel like going, at least for now.
 
Thank you! And there is a lot happening with Christiana right now. It turns out that the state is both more influential and more interesting than I had imagined. The text isn't ready to post yet, but the outline is on my site. http://karnell.weebly.com/christiana.html

As for numbers, I have to confess that I hate doing them. It's not how I like to write. Majority/Plurality is as detailed as I feel like going, at least for now.

Oh! It looks like Christiana is far more interesting than most people would have given it credit for.

And that's cool. It you're ever interested in figuring out percentages down the road, I can try to help. :)
 
Can't decide if my OTL hometown is in Middle or New Holland. Nonetheless, the Michigan nationalist in me loves to see Upper Country as really "Greater Michigan." ;) Love the detail you put into this! This language map was interesting.
 
Can't decide if my OTL hometown is in Middle or New Holland. Nonetheless, the Michigan nationalist in me loves to see Upper Country as really "Greater Michigan." ;) Love the detail you put into this! This language map was interesting.

I'm from Illinois, the state with the least self-pride out of the fifty (for real, it's been studied). So I believe strongly, in OTL, in developing a wider Great Lakes consciousness. This project lets me play out that particular bias of mine, I suppose.

Maybe I should make it more clear on the map, but most of those subdivisions should have the word "Country" after the name. So Detroit Country, The Middle Country, and so forth. New Holland is one of the few that doesn't. I can see how that would be confusing. One more thing to revise, I suppose.

If you're near Grand Rapids or Kalamazoo, then you would probably live in New Holland. Here's the cities and languages overlaid. Both of those cities exist in TTL, but OTL Holland (New Leiden) is the major city of the region. New Holland is one of the constituents that I want to explore more.

Upper Country new holland detail.png
 
Top