Introduction
Today I should feel relieved to come back to my home soil after fighting so long for it. Instead I only feel guilt and regret about killing for British interests and hegemony. We must lead our country towards its own path if we do not want to lead a century of British domination over us.
- Francois-Joseph Paul de Grasse

We thought that forming an allied french state in the form of the Duchy of Provence would grant us control over Napoleonic France and her allies and ensure our domination over Europe. We didn't realise we were only thinking ahead for ten to twenty years.
- Benjamin Disraeli

The nations of Europe must learn to accept the will of the people in order to maintain order and a sense of cooperation between the peoples of the continent.
- Napoleon III

The times of fighting have ceased. Let us come together into a bright future, for it belongs to us continentals.
- Otto von Bismarck

It is time for us to look for new allies and new friends if we are to keep the state of our Empire intact.
- Winston Churchill

More than two hundred years ago our founding fathers fought the British for liberty and the right for our country to exist. Today, the British are once more threatening our way of life and ours and the peoples of the world's rights to liberty. Let us follow the path of our Founding Fathers and continue the fight for what we truly believe in.
- Franklin D. Roosevelt

Today I announce that the Dominion of Australia is no more. We will dictate our own way, one not dictated by a monarch and country half a world away.
- John Curtin

They fought the war for Africa. Instead they destroyed it.
- Nnamdi Azikiwe

The Russians have slaughtered the forefathers of our revolution. It is time for us to take revenge.
- Mao Zedong

Never has the sun of Japan shined so bright, yet I feel deep inside that this sun is about to be obstructed by huge clouds.
- Emperor Akihito

It did not have to come to this, but it did. And I will never forgive myself to not having been able to do more.
- Nelson Mandela

Hello everyone ! After much thought and reflection, I finally decided to launch my own graphics timeline. I had this project in mind for a long while now, and I never got around to actually making it kick off. But I finally got the courage to start it, and so here we go. I was of course strongly inspired by @Kanan and @LeinadB93's wonerdful timelines, but also by @KaiserEmu which I feel is very much underrated. This is therefore my own shot at creating a timeline.

What's this ?
Well every TL I saw generally greatly favored the British Empire and Commonwealth. So I decided to mix things up in a world where the British Empire totally collapses (most of it anyways), leading to a stronger Europe. However, this would all come with a British decision in the first place, which was to establish a French Government-in-Exile in Southern France and later Sardinia and Liguria. However, Frenchmen don't really like being at the boot of the Brits and things go south from there...

What is the POD ?
Young Corporal Bonaparte is affected to the Army of the Rhine and gets his share of glory in Mayenz instead of Toulon. Toulon falls to the English who quickly overrun Provence and establish the Kingdom of France. However the King is very unpopular and the Comte de Grasse, a war hero takes over instead. De Grasse founds the Duchy of Provence under British supervision, but quickly turns towards isolating the country as much as possible from Britain, although the mere presence of the Duchy helps contain Napoleonic France who never really meddles in Italy or Spain. However, in 1848, things start to turn south as a Republic is declared...

What will you post ?
Infoboxes, maps, everything. However I will try to focus more on the geographical and historical aspects rather than the political ones, which I am frankly pretty bad at describing or putting into infoboxes.

How often will you post ?
I'm aiming for twice a week, but frequency may vary depending on how much work I have to get done.

Is the TL collaborative ?
No unfortunately, but I will take any idead you have about any country. Outside of Australia, New Zealand, France, the UK and the US, my knowledge in local politics and historical politics is lacking.

What's the state of the World ?
Well it's not terrible unless you live in Subsaharan Africa, or the Middle East, or East Asia....
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The Republic of Provence
The Republic of Provence was first established by the British Government as a foothold in Southern France after their victory at the Battle of Toulon. However, settlement did not go as expected, as the locals refused to have the king stay and instead accepted retired admiral and war hero, Francois-Joseph Paul de Grasse as First Duke of Provence. Too bothered with the wars ongoing, Britain accepted and started militarising the new state, which effectively cut off France from Italy and Northern Africa. However, the British had to soon realise that they could not conquer all of France, and with the Peace of Avignon, had to sign a truce. However, the Duchy of Provence, thanks to the geography of the region, had managed to stay strong, and the British had managed to make the french directory recognize the Duchy.
This would however be a source of embarassment for the French Directory, who fell to Napoleon. Under Napoleon, France tried to invade Provence several times, but wasn't able to shake off the thorn in their boot. It was during these times that Provence, with British help, seized Sardinia, Genoa and Liguria in order to further protect the coast and solidify their positions. Provence managed to remain neutral during the Napoleonic Wars, despite British pleas to intervene, as De Grasse's policy of neutrality to better strengthen the nation was put into place. This policy also infuriated Napoleon, who couldn't meddle in Italian affairs, apart from the First Italian Campaign, and was too scared of a British attack through Provence to attack Spain. For several years, Provence therefore became a giant naval base for Britain, until the 1848 European Revolutions came.
In 1848, a wave of revolutions swept through Europe, bringing the time of absolute monarchies to an end. It was no different in Provence, as the Republicans toppled the Duchy, who was anyways not very keen on keeping power. The new Republic kicked out the British forces from Provence and moved towards reconciliacion with Napoleonic France, who shifted towards a constitutional monarchy.
Provence therefore started to colonise sparses of Africa, with colonies in Tunisia, Libya and Mauritania. Some of those colonies would remain under Provencal rule until the present day. These include Carthage and Port-de-Grasse. Provence also moved towards the industrial revolution as a mediator between European powers, mediating the Germano-French treaty of friendship and the establisment of the Austro-Hungarian nations after the Civil War of 1930 During these times, Provence did not go unmolested however. In 1915, the Italian Unification Wars began, and Piedmont invaded Provence. However, the Provencaux were able to defeat Piedmont and end Italian Unification before it even began.
During the World War, Provence remained neutral at first, but had to join the Allies to protect its interests in Africa and on the continent as Piedmont attacked the small country once more. With the Allies winning the war, Provence sat at the table of the victors, and became one of the founding members of the European Trade Union along with France, Northern Germany, Bavaria, Flanders and Catalunya,
Today, the Republic of Provence is one of the richest nations in Europe, mainly due to its light restrictions on taxes and its many tourist destinations. The country enjoys friendly relations with most European nations, barring maybe Turkey and Spain in recent years.

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Kudos on starting a thread, this looks good!

Ironic that Tunisia is still called like that without Tunis

What are the status of the local romance regional languages, mainly Provencal Occitan, Ligurian and Sardinian, Are they just considered dialects of French/Italians, are they protected, were they suppressed?

Wouldn't a British-influenced Provence mean that Corsica would safely be independent/occupied during the napoleonic wars (if they happened as IRL), if so, how did france get corsica back?

Is the Elba island provençal? it looks like it on the world map but doesn't appear on the infobox.
 
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Kudos on starting a thread, this looks good!

Ironic that Tunisia is still called like that without Tunis

What are the status of the local romance regional languages, mainly Provencal Occitan, Ligurian and Sardinian, Are they just considered dialects of French/Italians, are they protected, were they suppressed?

Wouldn't a British-influenced Provence mean that Corsica would safely be independent/occupied during the napoleonic wars (if they happened as IRL), if so, how did france get corsica back?

Is the Elba island provençal? it looks like it on the world map but doesn't appear on the infobox.
Thanks !
So, regional languages are "tolerated" in the area, however they are not taught at school, and students only have the option to learn them from 7th grade and up, the emphasis being put on French, Italian and English. However, there are special private schools in which regional languages (mostly Sardinian and Catalan) are taught on the condition that French, Italian and English are also taught.
Corsica was occupied by Provence and Britain but ceded back to France with the city of Martigues, first after the first Italian Campaign, where Napoleon nearly managed to surround Provence, then again at the Treaty of Tilsit, where Provence ceded the islands and the city in exchange for recognition from Napoleonic France (and some demilitarisation of British soldiers in the area, notably around the Rhone Valley).
Elba is Provencal, but it is a minor holdout, that was acquired only in 1917 following the Italian Wars.
 
Watched and good luck!

I'm most curious about the dismemberment of Spain.
Thanks ! Spain like a lot of European nations went through a violent civil war in the early 30s similar to the Spanish Civil War of OTL, however much more brutal as the hardliner government of the time worked to suppress local languages. Spain descended into a state of anarchy, which led to an Anglo-Portuguese intervention in the west and a Franco-Moroccan intervention in the East and the colonies to restore order. The loss of Spain (a member of the London Accords) would be one of the reasons Britain lost the World War.
 
Italian Unification War
The Italian Unification War was the first of one of the many wars during the European Crisis in the early 20th century. After decades of separation from one another, most Italian States had already chosen their own way, with the Kingdom of Naples heeling to France under the house of Murat, the Papal States being neutral (although they would later claim the title of Republic of Italy), and the Republic of Venice becoming an Austro-Hungarian ally. Only the Kingdom of Piedmont remained to really unify Italy. Their takeover of the Duchy of Tuscany went relatively unnoticed in 1912, as most nations didn't really have formal relations with the small duchy anyways. Piedmont then turned to Austria-Hungary for help. The Empire had had their own struggles with internal politics, and saw the advantages of a united Italy against the increasingly bothersome Serene Republic of Venice, who made moves to get closer to France notably during the Annexation of the Ionian Islands.
Austria-Hungary therefore sent many advisors to the Piemontese, who planned to attack Venice first with Austrian assistance. However, the Magenta Compact (named after the French Warship it was signed on) went on to disturb this plan. With this compact, the independence of the Kingdom of Naples and the Republic of Venice would be guaranteed by both France and Provence. This would greatly unnerve the Piemontese leadership, who considered backing down. However, the Piemontese Royalist leadership under Emanuele Filiberto, Duke of Aosta, remained convinced that the Austro-Hungarians would intervene and help them take over Venice and enough of Provence to stop France from intervening, already trying to avoid a War with Britain over the status of Nigeria.
Finally, on July 7th, 1915, Piemontese troops invaded Venice and Provence simultaneously. However, the French response was immediate, as both the Kingdom of Naples and the French Republic declared war on Piedmont hours later. Worse, the German ambassador to Austria-Hungary Heinrich von Tschirskiy threatened Austrian Emperor Franz-Joseph I with war if ever Austria-Hungary intervened in such a blatant violation of Venetian sovereignty. Austria-Hungary was forced to back down as Piedmont was forced alone into the war.
Although the Piemontese forces managed to gain ground early on, they were stopped at the Battle of Vittorio-Veneto by the Venetians and at the Battle of Fossane by Provencal and French forces under Provencal general Louis "Luigi" Cadorna. The latter would be the bloodiest confrontation of the war, along with the later Franco-Venetian victory at Solferino, where the Piemontese suffered huge casualties. Soon enough Piedmont was forced to capitulate to the Compact. Piedmont would have to cede many border territories, including Low Tyrol they recieved from Austria-Hungary, to Venice, Northern Cuneo province to Provence and liberate the Duchy of Tuscany.
Provence would also annex the Island of Elba, bathed in blood after Admiral di Revel tried to make his last stand. The Provencal navy proved to be much more solid, only losing the Battleship Cagliari to Piedmont's entire fleet. The disastrous war would push Piedmont towards a military dictatorship, as many blamed the royals for the defeats, with Piedro Badroglio taking charge in 1919. The War would also be the beginning of the end for Austria-Hungary, who invested massively into the war, albeit without comitting any forces. This and the later economic downturn and ethnic conflicts would result in the Austro-Hungarian Civil War of 1930 and the fall of the Empire.
The Magenta Compact would leave this war strengthened, and the Compact went on to sign the Strasbourg treaty of Mutual Assistance in 1927, this time also including Bavaria, Germany, Poland and Flanders, which would prompt Britain to sign the London Accords with Russia, Portugal and the Netherlands. The STMA and the LC would be the basis of the World War, which would bring the whole world crashing down only fifteen years later.

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So greece does not have east thrace but does have north epirus.i imagine the balkan wars happened and since there was no italy to stop them they gained it(but no second balkan war?)(does greece have imbros and tenedos?)
Also if cyprus gained independence they would join greece,they were pretty big on enosis if I remember correctly(thought I wonder why that is not the case)
Does greece have a monarchy or is it a republic?
 
How is Denmark-Norway doing? And why is it not part of the EU like Sweden is?
Fairly well, they are an Associated Member of the ETU, as they are a member of the Nordic Union, and member of the Bastogne Area, which allows free travel between European nations. They refuse to join the ETU for mainly the same reasons as OTL, as they do not have many agricultural areas for a high GNP/Capita and would feel like they would be paying for other countries' welfare without seeing any benefits. For them being inside the Bastogne Area and having summits with the ETU is more than enough. Also Scotland would be bothering them a lot with Hjaltland. And the EU is bothering them with their oil exploitation not being very friendly to the environment...
Sweden is much closer to the ETU in OTL, with the Bernadotte and Bonaparte houses being close. Sweden has also adopted the Euro unlike their OTL counterparts.

So greece does not have east thrace but does have north epirus.i imagine the balkan wars happened and since there was no italy to stop them they gained it(but no second balkan war?)(does greece have imbros and tenedos?)
Also if cyprus gained independence they would join greece,they were pretty big on enosis if I remember correctly(thought I wonder why that is not the case)
Does greece have a monarchy or is it a republic?
Indeed, the Balkan Wars went very differently in OTL (Bulgaria encircled the Ottomans at Adrianople and cut them off at Salonica, winning the lion's share of the Empire), added to the fact that WW1 never happened, instead it being several proxy conflicts such as the Russo-Polish War, the Italian Wars, the Balkans Wars, the Spanish and Austro-Hungarian Civil War ect...
The Ottomans were the big loser of the whole deal during their collapse in an another civil war in the 1920s, which means Greece has control of all of the islands in the Aegean Sea. They also occupy the Stadia (OTL Datca) Peninsula.
Cyprus were occupied by the U.K during the World War and was never taken by the Allied forces (like Malta). As one of the "Unpregnable Three", the UK were allowed to keep it, and refused to give it independence or cede it to Greece (who was neutral during the World War, unlike Romania and Bulgaria, who fought on opposing sides of the War. Cyprus only recently acquired its independence (2004), and thoughts of reunification with Greece were rejected for a long time. It is only recently that there have been talks of reuniting the two countries, with a referendum being scheduled for 2021.
Today Greece is a monarchy, as it never fell, and has strong ties to the European monarchies of Britain, France, Germany and the Netherlands, and debates on joining the EDF and ETU due to the recent Nationalist resurgence in Turkey.
 
Fairly well, they are an Associated Member of the ETU, as they are a member of the Nordic Union, and member of the Bastogne Area, which allows free travel between European nations. They refuse to join the ETU for mainly the same reasons as OTL, as they do not have many agricultural areas for a high GNP/Capita and would feel like they would be paying for other countries' welfare without seeing any benefits. For them being inside the Bastogne Area and having summits with the ETU is more than enough. Also Scotland would be bothering them a lot with Hjaltland. And the EU is bothering them with their oil exploitation not being very friendly to the environment...
Sweden is much closer to the ETU in OTL, with the Bernadotte and Bonaparte houses being close. Sweden has also adopted the Euro unlike their OTL counterparts.
That sounds nice, how much representation does Norway have in the union or is it kinda like Greenland and the Faeroe islands are handled today? And most importantly is the welfare state still a thing? I have to say though I love the map and attention to details in this timeline my only beef is that Hungary's border is exactly the same as otl.
 
That sounds nice, how much representation does Norway have in the union or is it kinda like Greenland and the Faeroe islands are handled today? And most importantly is the welfare state still a thing? I have to say though I love the map and attention to details in this timeline my only beef is that Hungary's border is exactly the same as otl.
Norway has equal representation to Denmark (although Denmark has technically more deputies/representatives). The welfare state is still a thing, but less generalised than OTL, as for Hungary, their state was destroyed during the A-H Civil War, so they couldn't really expand during the World War against Romania for example.
 
François Joseph Paul, Comte de Grasse
François Joseph Paul, Comte de Grasse, was the first Duke of Provence, and Admiral of both France and Provence. He is regarded as the founder of the Duchy of Provence and its modern-day counterpart the Republic of Provence, and is regarded by many in the country as one of the reasons the British never took a full hold on the country.
Having served as Admiral in the French Navy, De Grasse was made prisoner by Sir George Rodney's fleet at the Battle of the Saintes, thwarting the planned French invasion of Jamaica. It is in captivity that he and his British counterpart exchanged their views on naval warfare, politics and forgein relations, before De Grasse was repatriated to France. Following his court-martial for his failure to defeat the British fleet, De Grasse retired back to the south of France in his estate of Le-Bar-sur-Loup. During the invasion of France, and the establishment of the French government in the south of France, De Grasse was called upon by Rodney and the British government to stabilise the region in the name of the king of France.
De Grasse knew that the British were stretched thin and that the region wouldn't accept a French king that easily, and negociated the formation of the Duchy of Provence, raising several armies and a fleet, resisting republican incursions during the Provencal War and the Italian Campaign, he and his British allies managed to form the Duchy of Provence during the Peace of Avignon in 1797.
De Grasse then worked hard during the last years of his life to lay the foundations of the new Provencal state. He knew he could not kick the British out of the area, for this would mean total British occupation. Instead, he limited British presence with the Free Provence Act, essentially the closest thing to a declaration of independence the country had. De Grasse managed to convince several royalist factions in Vendée, the North and the East to emigrate to Provence, while still maintaining that the King wasn't needed.
He also maintained the policy of neutrality Provence held, and although he was forced to cede Corsica and Martigues back to France in 1799, he managed to make Napoleon Bonaparte, first consul of France, recognize the newly formed state. Additionally, De Grasse strenthened the Provencal position in the Mediterrannean, expanding Toulon's naval base and expanding the ranks of the Provencal Army, including by the integration of the Piemontese and Ligurian militias.
De Grasse also reached for reconciliation with France, a task which would be achieved with his successor, André Masséna, who had fought with Bonaparte before his defection to Provence, in 1811. The "Old Admiral" would also open diplomatic relations with several european countries, including the Kingdom of Austria, the Kingdom of Prussia and the United States. For the latter, he was visited by Thomas Jefferson in his estate in Bar-sur-Loup in 1799, where the United States offered him six canons from the Battle of Yorktown, in which he proved to be a decisive factor to ensure an American victory. It was this visit that cemented the good relations between Provence and the US, which lasts to this day. The canons are still on display in De Grasse's estate, which has since become a museum.
De Grasse died in 1800, in the Ducal Palace of Nice. His ashes were transferred to Nice Cathedral for burial, where he rests today. Every year, dignitaries from the United States (generally the Vice-President or Secretary of State but more recently presidents have come as well) lay a crown of flowers on the "Old Admiral"'s tomb in Nice during Provence's "Freedom Day". He was succeeded by his close collaborator and commander-in-chief of the Army, André Masséna, who would bridge the gap with France and enforce the neutrality doctrine that would infuriate British leadership for the years to come.

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List of Atomic Powers
Atomic weapons or Weapons of Mass Destruction have been operating all across the globe since 1945, when the United States detonated "Trinity". Over the course of history, these weapons have been only detonated against human targets seven times, thankfully, twice during the World War, four times during the Indian Coalition War and once during the Chinese Intervention in Central Asia.
The United States were the first to acquire nuclear weapons during Project Manhattan, where US scientists successfully detonated Trinity in the New Mexican desert. The United States would go on to detonate the first nuclear bomb against a civilian target, in Hiroshima, against Japan, then against a tactical target, in the Naval Base of Kure. The United States would go on to operate more than 500 tests, both under and overground, with several atmospheric test and one nuclear launch into space (See Project Balthazar). The United States currently operates more warheads than all other nuclear powers combined.
France were the second nation to detonate nuclear weapons, just five years after the United States. Under the Franco-German project Iron Fist, scientists from both countries contributed to obtaining nuclear weapons. France were the first to recieve nuclear warheads, due to their wider operational range, while Germany obtained them five years later after a test in German Tanganyika. Both nations are technically the only european nations disposing of nuclear weapons, although under the EDF, french warheads are stored at Salon-de-Provence, Provence, at Kleine Brogel, Flanders and at SAFB Lossiemouth, Scotland, while german warheads are stored at Lask Air Base, Poland-Lithuania and at Skaraborg AFB, Sweden. Note that all these require a dual-key system to activate.
Australia was the next country to develop nuclear weapons. Encouraged by the United States, the acquisition of nuclear weapons by Australia was supposed to ensure peace and stability in the South-East Asia and Pacific Region. Instead it did the opposite, with the acceleration of the Chinese nuclear program, and China developing its own nuclear weapons in 1964.
The U.S and Europe then tried to enforce a nuclear non-proliferation treaty, however China would not have any of it and declined to sign it, killing the first treaty in its crib. The U.S therefore allowed Brazil and Persia to start a nuclear program, under U.S supervision. Brazil completed its first test in 1968, while Persia would follow suit in 1971. This only exacerbated Chinese pile-up, which peaked during the Chinese Intervention in Central Asia, where China detonated a nuclear warhead in Dushanbe, the first detonation on civilian targets since the World War. Utterly terrified by this and with the racking up of tensions during the Great Asian Crisis, the U.S greenlit Japan and Korea to develop warheads. By 1974, both nations had functionning warheads, and threat of an all-out nuclear war was looming. Thankfully, things de-escalated, and China finally agreed to sign the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty in 1978, which forbid any nation from developing nuclear weapons or stockpiling any more.
This wouldn't stop six more nations from developing nuclear weapons however. India and Hyderabad never signed the NPT, and therefore developed nuclear weapons anyways. India viewed nuclear weapons as an alternative to reclaiming Southern India, and obtained their nukes in 1982. India then expected an easy victory against Hyderabad and the Southern Indian Coalition, forcing Hyderabad to use their first nuclear device directly in the field. The resulting fallout was devastating, and both nations came to a halt, with the war ending soon after the detonation of no less than four warheads (two from each side). Both countries still use MAD in order to protect their independence to this day.
The next country to have developed nuclear weapons is Canada, who found a loophole in the Treaty of Versailles, which mentions that the UK cannot develop nuclear weapons, but it was stated nowhere that a Commonwealth Country couldn't. Canada therefore tested four nuclear weapons, withdrew from the NPT and constructed an estimated total of 15 nukes. However, this did not sit well with the US, who threatened Canada with intervention if these 15 weapons ever left tjhe country. The Great Lakes Crisis would only last a few days, but it would prove costly for the Canadian economy, who eventually folded to the US with the Hamilton Agreement.
The last country to have obtained nuclear weapons was Siam, due to aggressive positionning from China and tensions mounting in Burma, Under Franco-German supervision, the Siamese built an estimated 15 nuclear warheads, to be detonated only if necessary. This flew under the U.S radar, who didn't really take kindly to chinese positionning anyways, although the U.S did sanction Siam in order to keep China at bay, before taking the sanctions away a few years later.
The U.S are also suspected to have given Israel nuclear weapons, although this has never been proven, as the Jewish State never acknowledged having any of these weapons. However, this is not the main concern of the world today, as it is turned towards the pariah Saudi State, a well-known islamic terrorism funder and internationally isolated and hated. The Saudis have exactly five nukes, although none are deployed, and they remain the most fiercly tracked weapons in the world. Ever since the Saudis tried to smuggle one of these warheads to Indonesia onwards towards an unknown target of terrorist organisation Al-Qaeda, the U.S has warned the Saudis that if one of their nukes crossed a meter out of their border or international waters, their country would cease to exist. The U.S would prove they mean business by deploying nuclear weapons to air force bases in Oman, the UAE and Qatar.

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What would you guys like to see next ?
 
2018 Provencal Presidential Election, Parties of Provence
The 2018 Provencal presidential election was a decisive election for modern-day Provence. With the Alliance Républicaine in power since the late 1990s, no left-wing coalition had managed to take down the right-wing coalition. However, 2018 saw the rise of the Green and Worker's rights parties, usually far behind in the polls. This led the Parti Socialiste de Provence (PSP) leader Massimo Zedda to form a coalition with the Parti pour la Dépendance Ecologique de Provence (PDEP) to try and topple incumbent president Hubert Falco. However, Falco still had strong support, mainly among the Arab and Western Provencal voters, which resulted in Hubert Falco getting reelected by a short margin of less than two million votes. This was still a victory for the left-wing alliance though, who gathered enough seats to dethrone the AR in the Chamber of Deputies and launched a serious opposition for the first time in years.

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List of major Provencal Parties:

Alliance Républicaine (AR): Right-wing/Conservative Party, Pro-buisness, Pro-ETU
Parti Socialiste de Provence (PSP): Center-Left Party, Socialist, Pro-Spending, Pro-ETU
Parti pour la Dépendance Ecologique de Provence (PDEP): Ecologists, Pro-ETU
Parti de l'Unification: Far-Right, Pro-Reunification with France, Mildly Anti-Arab and anti-immigration, no clear stance on ETU
Front pour la Liberté des Peuples Arabes (FLPA): Pan-Arabist, Arab breakaway group, Far-Right, Anti-ETU
Partito Sarde (PS): Pro-Sardinian autonomy, Center-Right, Pro-ETU
Partito di Italia: Far Right, Pro-Italian Unification, no clear stance on ETU, Anti-immigration
Front de Gauche Provencal (FDGP): Left-Wing hardliners, Anti-ETU, Anti-buisness
Front des Agriculteurs et des Ouvriers Méditerranéens (FAOM): Left-Wing, Pro-Arab, Anti-ETU, Anti-buisness
Mouvement Contre la Corruption Gouvernementale de Provence (MCCGP): Center-Left, Pro-buisness but anti-corruption, pro-ETU, pro-government transparency
Parti Communist Provencal (PCP): Anti-ETU, Far Left

Next up, a bloody conflict
 
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Spanish Civil War New
The Spanish Civil War was the final conflict in the European Crisis leading up to the World War. It raged for more than four years and devastated the spanish countryside, and split the country into many factions. The roots of the civil war took effect during the fall of the Primo de Rivera dictatorship, as the Kingdom of Spain remained a staunch British ally due to facing possible French aggression. However, with the fall of the regime and the proclamation of the Second Spanish Republic, British interests suddenly took a sharp dive, as the French-supported Republicans took power. With Portugal backs against the wall, and Spain falling to the European Alliance's side, Britain and Portugal went on to support a military coup, spurred on by General Jose Sanjurjo. Although the coup succeeded, it was still a disaster for the London Accords, who saw Sanjurjo refuse to let the monarchy come back and instead proclaimed the Spanish State, and vowed to keep the independence and interests of Spain as far away from the British and French factions as possible. With little to no support in Spain, who were torn between Republicans and Monarchists, the country soon disintigrated.
With Sanjurjo's brutal repression of strikes and protests, the flame was soon lit for a civil war. Workers and civilians began arming themselves and some parts of the Army defected. Soon, Spain was split into three camps: the Monarchists, the Radicals and the Republicans. France and Britain supported their own camp of course, but neither dared to intervene, thinking that doing so would be provoking war with each other. For two years, the civil war raged on, with bloody battles occuring in Toledo, Valencia and Santander.
By 1936 however, the great powers had become weary of each other taking too much ground, and the endless fighting that seemed to be to the advantage of the Radicals meant that an intervention had to be made. Interestingly, both the Alliance and the Accords made their intervention known on the same week. France was the first to announce its intervention, flooding in troops into the Basque Country, Aragon and Catalunya, rapidly reaching the frontlines at Valencia. Their help would also help the Republicans secure the Balearic Islands, as well as the Spanish possessions in Africa, such as Western Sahara, the Rif and Guinea, who were taken by either French or Moroccan forces. German troops soon followed, with other Alliance members not following suit but providing material and humanitarian aid.
The British response came three days later, as a force led by Kenneth Anderson comprised of British and Portuguese soldiers invaded Galicia, which until then was held by the radicals. Since the Monarchists were in a very bad state, the British and Portuguese saw much of the fighting, but by 1937 had secured Galicia, parts of the Asturias with the help of the Asturias Libres Movement, as well as Extremadura and parts of Andalucia.
The Radicals were now in a tough spot, and the death of Emilio Mola at the Battle of Cadiz did not help things at all. Finally, on November 8th, 1937, Francisco Franco and Jose Enrique Varela decided to defect along with the Army of Africa to the Monarchist side. This event completely blew the wind out of the Radical sails, who found themselves backs against the wall. Thus begun the Race for Madrid, between Republicans and Monarchists, and it was the Monarchists that got there first, but not after a two-month siege. With Jose Sanjurjo killed in the fighting, the Radicals surrenderred on June 7th, 1938.
However, it was not the end of the Civil War, as now the French-led and British-led factions found themselves at odds with each other. Not willing to start a war with each other over control of Spain, the Accords and the Alliance met in Istres, Provence to mediate a peace treaty. Finally, on November 13th, 1938, the Istres Agreement was signed. Although not perfect, it was an agreement that would eventually stand.
Since they were in control of Madrid, the Monarchists had managed to gather enough support to recognize the Kingdom of Spain as an independent nation. The Asturias would remain seperate, with Portuguese protection, as their role in the liberation of the region was big enough, and after the Asturian uprising, many didnt want a monarch ruling over them. As such, Galicia was also incorporated into Portugal following a local referendum. The Republicans were naturally outraged, and opted for their own government. However, the Alliance didn't control much territory, and only managed to create the Republics of the Basque Country and Catalunya (regarded as the successor to Republican Spain by the Republicans). However, the Alliance did control Aragon, which was eventually traded to Monarchist Spain for the Valencian coast, who had fallen into monarchist hands. As for the African territories, they were incorporated into the Moroccan Protectorate, or in the case of Guinea, transferred to Republican control.
The consequences of this Civil War and Istres Agreement were immense. Although Britain had maintained an ally in the Spanish Peninsula, it had created two Alliance-bound nations. Furthermore, the extent of the destruction in Spain would mean that the Spanish would refuse to intervene in the World War under the guise of reconstruction. It was not until 1947 that Spain was declared "Rebuilt", but by then the Accords had fallen. Spain nevertheless still supported their British and Portuguese allies, being a neutral middle-man between the two countries and allowing the passing of documents, materiel and resources through the country, all of which were vital to keep the Portuguese nation alive.

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@Wings, let me give you an important question on your latest/recent post:
  • What are the causes of Spanish Civil War which causes independence of three states?
  • How did the Spaniards, Catalan, Basques, and Asturians viewed the civil war which fought for four years? Is it a tragic memory or not?
  • What happened to Spanish colonies after civil war? Should colonies kept under Spanish rule or changes according to Istres Agreement?
  • Why did the United Kingdom entered the civil war at the side of Monarchists? What are the reasons why that Spanish Civil War between Republicans, Radicals, and Monarchists should the United Kingdom needs to act?
 
@Wings, let me give you an important question on your latest/recent post:
  • What are the causes of Spanish Civil War which causes independence of three states?
  • How did the Spaniards, Catalan, Basques, and Asturians viewed the civil war which fought for four years? Is it a tragic memory or not?
  • What happened to Spanish colonies after civil war? Should colonies kept under Spanish rule or changes according to Istres Agreement?
  • Why did the United Kingdom entered the civil war at the side of Monarchists? What are the reasons why that Spanish Civil War between Republicans, Radicals, and Monarchists should the United Kingdom needs to act?
Most of it is loosely explained in the description above but let me try to elaborate:
- The Civil War happened because of the rift between Republicans and Monarchists during the elections of 1931. The Republicans won said election, and not wanting to have a communist Spain in Europe, the Army orchestrated a coup, taking over power, but refusing to give power to the monarchists and establishing the Spanish State. It was not long till the workers armed and the Republicans rose up, while the British didn’t like loosing an important ally in the Peninsula and armed the monarchists.
- For all it is a tragic memory. The Spaniards especially of course, as it fractured their country forever and it still leaves marks today. The Basques see it as a tragic twist of fate, as they managed to gain their independence during this conflict, while the Asturians didn’t want to break from Spain but the massacres committed there left a deep scar that left the Asturians unwilling to reunite. For the Catalans, their country was initially created as « East Spain », so for them it isn’t a good memory either, it is when they split from their compatriots (except Catalan independentists).
- Spanish colonies in Africa were seized very early on during the French intervention and incorporated into Morocco, while Guinea was transferred back to the Republicans and became Spain in exile, before being renamed the Spanish Republic of Guinea (or Oriental Guinea). The Canaries are an exception, as due to the British naval blockade of the islands, they were transferred to the monarchists very soon as the British stormed the islands.
- Because the Republicans were allied to the French, and the Radicals were absolutely not favorable to Britain (or France either for that matter). This meant that Britain lost a big ally that forced France to divert forces south and generally held the key to Gibraltar. Britain therefore needed a Monarchist Spain favorable to them. They intervened because the Radicals and Republicans were gaining ground and their fears that either a power opposed to Britain or even worse, allied to France, would take over the Spanish Peninsula. The Monarchists were very much on the back foot by then and only occupied the Asturias (even then it was the ALM that controlled it), parts of Andalucia, Murcia and Valencia as well as parts of Extremadura. The rest was Radical or Republican territory (the Republicans only held Basque, Aragon and Catalunya but this was a much more solid industry base than the Monarchists, as well as having way more troops).
 
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