A Time For Greatness: The Alternate Presidency of John F. Kennedy and beyond

You should've given Goldwater a go against Kennedy, that would've been very cool to see.
I actually have two versions of this timeline in my notes - version a) where Kennedy runs for re-election against Goldwater, and version b) where Kennedy runs for re-election against Rockefeller.

That's not to say that Rockefeller is a sure thing - far from it. He's still not popular with many conservatives and the divorce hangs over his head.
 
I actually have two versions of this timeline in my notes - version a) where Kennedy runs for re-election against Goldwater, and version b) where Kennedy runs for re-election against Rockefeller.

That's not to say that Rockefeller is a sure thing - far from it. He's still not popular with many conservatives and the divorce hangs over his head.
You probably know that Goldwater and JFK were close friends, notwithstanding their diametric political opposition, and at one point at least semi-seriously discussed barnstorming the country together in 1964, holding debates on the spot wherever they went. Kennedy once famously inscribed a photograph of himself that Goldwater (a highly skilled lensman) had taken, "To my friend Barry Goldwater, whom I urge to follow the career for which he has shown so much talent...photography."
 
Oh hey, I just remembered something that I don't think has been covered yet. In 1963-64 there was a major epidemic of rubella (then popularly called "German measles") in the U.S.. One of the side effects is that when a pregnant woman comes down with rubella, her baby has a high likelihood of being hearing-impaired from birth. That's why there is a large population of people in their late 50's today who are hearing-impaired in varying degrees of severity...including yours truly; I was born in early March of 1964.

So, does the rubella epidemic occur ITTL?
 

Ariosto

Kicked
<SNIP>
Two major points....
One, Rockefeller was never on the path to winning the Republican nomination. Goldwaterites had essentially overrun the Caucuses that year that nominated the overwhelming majority of the delegates to the Republican Convention, and carrying California is not going to change any of their minds in terms of who they are supporting. Even among favorite sons, there was serious dissension against Rockefeller amongst those delegates that represented the South (virtually nill support), Midwest and Prairie West that would have kept him from attaining the necessary support to cross the threshold.
Edit: To be clear I thought that Rockefeller was presented as a.... clear favorite in the narrative. I still don't see a path for Rockefeller's nomination though.
Two, George Wallace never intended to start a Third Party when he was considering his Independent run in '64. Wallace and his cohorts intended to co-opt the Unpledged Electors movement that was gaining steam at the time, essentially a repeat of the Thurmond Campaign of '48. As an example, in '68 there were plenty of folks who tried to take out papers to run as American Independent candidates for various offices across the country, but Wallace himself made it abundantly clear that this should not be done and actively dissuaded as many as he could from doing so. His aims have always been within the Democratic Party, and it would amount to shooting himself in the foot to bolt considering he was at the time the political boss of the Democratic Party in Alabama. A Wallace-lead Conservative Third Party was simply never considered.
 
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Two major points....
One, Rockefeller was never on the path to winning the Republican nomination. Goldwaterites had essentially overrun the Caucuses that year that nominated the overwhelming majority of the delegates to the Republican Convention, and carrying California is not going to change any of their minds in terms of who they are supporting. Even among favorite sons, there was serious dissension against Rockefeller amongst those delegates that represented the South (virtually nill support), Midwest and Prairie West that would have kept him from attaining the necessary support to cross the threshold.
Edit: To be clear I thought that Rockefeller was presented as a.... clear favorite in the narrative. I still don't see a path for Rockefeller's nomination though.
Noted.
Two, George Wallace never intended to start a Third Party when he was considering his Independent run in '64. Wallace and his cohorts intended to co-opt the Unpledged Electors movement that was gaining steam at the time, essentially a repeat of the Thurmond Campaign of '48. As an example, in '68 there were plenty of folks who tried to take out papers to run as American Independent candidates for various offices across the country, but Wallace himself made it abundantly clear that this should not be done and actively dissuaded as many as he could from doing so. His aims have always been within the Democratic Party, and it would amount to shooting himself in the foot to bolt considering he was at the time the political boss of the Democratic Party in Alabama. A Wallace-lead Conservative Third Party was simply never considered.
Hm, I'll look into that (happy to be provided resources if you've got them handy) and take a few days to reassess some things and edit the previous update to reflect this information.

Thanks for the information.
 

Ariosto

Kicked
Noted.

Hm, I'll look into that (happy to be provided resources if you've got them handy) and take a few days to reassess some things and edit the previous update to reflect this information.

Thanks for the information.
Well I've read "George Wallace", "Politics of Rage" and "Nixonland", and there are numerous articles in the NYT Archives. The extent of the campaign is talked about (here), and in many ways it can be seen as a weaker version of his '68 run. There is also the problem where sometimes a Third Party is simply started as a vehicle for an Independent Presidential campaign, just as the American Independent Party was for George Wallace and the National Unity Party was for John Anderson; this is more a fluke with balloting laws making it easier to seek the Presidency as the nominee of a "party" in many States.
This isn't to say that there wasn't a movement to establish some sort of Conservative Third Party (here), there certainly was an undercurrent that was present, born in the 60's and which continued thru the 70's into the Reagan years. The problem is that, while sympathetic to Wallace in many respects, many more embraced Goldwater, and that this feeling extended and divided even the Deep South ultimately crippled Wallace's efforts in '64.
 
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