While it would be a mistake to say that Brazil's independence was entirely peaceful, it was still thankfully much less violent than what took place in the rest of Latin America. A huge (perhaps the biggest) exception to that rule took place in Bahia, where the provincial capital of Salvador was occupied by Portuguese troops while the rest of the province was controlled by forces loyal to emperor Pedro I. A long siege ensued, one which ended with the withdrawal of the Portuguese back to Europe in July 2, 1823, almost a full year after the Grito do Ipiranga.

The Portuguese troops, led by Inácio Luís Madeira de Melo, made an attempt to break the siege at the Battle of Pirajá, but they were defeated by the entrenched Brazilians in spite of their advantage in numbers. What if they won, thus ending the siege of Salvador? Could the war spread to the rest of the Northeast, perhaps even as far as Pernambuco? I assume the pro-independence government centered in Cachoeira (another municipality in Bahia) would have to flee.

Finally, how could this affect Brazil's independence as a whole? Could the terms of the Treaty of Rio de Janeiro be less lenient to Lisbon because of the damages caused by a bigger and nastier war? IOTL Brazil had to pay its former overlord an indemnity of 2 million pounds.

Calling in @ByzantineCaesar, @Gukpard, @Kaiser of Brazil, @Gonzaga, @Lusitania and @Guilherme Loureiro.
 
While it would be a mistake to say that Brazil's independence was entirely peaceful, it was still thankfully much less violent than what took place in the rest of Latin America. A huge (perhaps the biggest) exception to that rule took place in Bahia, where the provincial capital of Salvador was occupied by Portuguese troops while the rest of the province was controlled by forces loyal to emperor Pedro I. A long siege ensued, one which ended with the withdrawal of the Portuguese back to Europe in July 2, 1823, almost a full year after the Grito do Ipiranga.

The Portuguese troops, led by Inácio Luís Madeira de Melo, made an attempt to break the siege at the Battle of Pirajá, but they were defeated by the entrenched Brazilians in spite of their advantage in numbers. What if they won, thus ending the siege of Salvador? Could the war spread to the rest of the Northeast, perhaps even as far as Pernambuco? I assume the pro-independence government centered in Cachoeira (another municipality in Bahia) would have to flee.

Finally, how could this affect Brazil's independence as a whole? Could the terms of the Treaty of Rio de Janeiro be less lenient to Lisbon because of the damages caused by a bigger and nastier war? IOTL Brazil had to pay its former overlord an indemnity of 2 million pounds.

Calling in @ByzantineCaesar, @Gukpard, @Kaiser of Brazil, @Gonzaga, @Lusitania and @Guilherme Loureiro.
I gonna call a portuguese expert

@Lusitania
 
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