A More Perfect Union: An Alternate History of the Land of the Free

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: Before 1900' started by HeX, May 22, 2019.

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  1. Whiteshore Defender of Myrcella Baratheon

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    Don't forget OTL Japan, where the Liberal Democrats won the PMship from 1955 to 1993 non-stop and have been in power for 60 out of 64 years in Japan.
     
  2. Durabys Anti-Monarchist

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    And tell me how that turned out for Japan? The Japan that has 30-year economic malaise. The Japan whose demography is collapsing thanks to the adoption of idiotic worker culture by the conservatives. The Japan who lags behind in tech and still uses Fax Machines and still refuses to teach English at schools because it still sees it as a foreign language and not world lingua franca.

    Any such monopolistic party will always cause the conservation of its own policies until it all explodes in everyones faces. Always.
     
  3. Whiteshore Defender of Myrcella Baratheon

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    True. I see your point.
     
  4. volantredx Well-Known Member

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    This happens even when power changes hands constantly. Just look at America after the Regan election, we swapped parties twice and it still resulted in basically the same economic policy being followed until it collapsed the world economy.
     
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  5. Cryostorm Monthly Donor

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    Maybe but you have to remember that in the US the main parties are "big tent" with factions that would be parties in most other countries. This means that while one party may dominate it will not be unchanging the entire time, take the rise of the Populist factions in the Republicans headed by Theodore Roosevelt and the Democrats by Bryans and FDR. In the US system the primaries serve almost like a normal election with the general the runoff between the biggest factions of each side.
     
  6. Thomas1195 Well-Known Member

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    How about Canada?
     
  7. Ismaili777 Well-Known Member

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    I feel like chauvinism about “Prussian spirit” will remain in this German military. Think of it, the military is kinda the part of this Germany that is the most Prussian. So that means probably a strong military industrial complex and extremely rigorous drilling. Also, just remove the swastika and I see potential for this.
    upload_2019-8-29_11-53-36.jpeg
    This man is your FRIEND. He fights for freedom and democracy!
    Swastika could easily be removed, perhaps I’ll make a proper version soon. Since I do like the eagle and think it symbolizes Prussian militarism which is retained, I might edit in an iron cross in that circle.
     
  8. Simeon La empresa crecerá más grande

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    I can see that the sustained Federalist dominance will soon be hated to the point of widespread unrest, and it will be interesting that way, revealing the alternate political struggles of a progressive, yet still regressing-at-times America that will ultimately give way to a much more stable multiparty system and guaranteed protection of its citizens against influencing and astroturfing.

    Oh boy, I can see how the yellow journalists ITTL will bring hell making the OTL Political Correctness debate look rational:

    OUTRAGEOUS! Senator McKinley SLAMMED for racist suggestion against the Philippino government
    By Sinéad Kennedy, The Boston Celtic, 19 June 1898

    (Of course, OTL President McKinley being such a massive white man’s burden ars—)

    Revolutionary Spirit was and is always needed to be spread - forcibly so, sometimes
    By William McKinley, Manifest Destiny; 21 November, 1889

    Oh Gods, n—

    To inject Revolutionary Spirit, spread the German Eagle first
    By Johannes Swift, The Garlic; May 1, 1891

    Fuck, my mind, stahp—

    The Revolutionary Burden, or how to stop loathing and love the spirit
    By Hermann Strangelove, Atomos; 24 April 1888

    the last title was quite good, though. Or will the Revolutionary burden be seen as piling upon one’s burden?
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2019
  9. Ismaili777 Well-Known Member

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    Thus is just sheer brilliant
     
  10. Threadmarks: Redemption, Part Fourteen: Wild, Wild West

    HeX Self-Proclaimed Disney Expert

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    October 31, 1889

    BANG!

    Dahteste Jennings didn't so much as flinch as the first bullet soared past her head and lodged itself an inch deep in the wall next to her. She merely readjusted her Stetson and went back to reloading her six-shooter.

    "Sheriff!" screamed her partner, Deputy Jackson Fitzpatrick, from behind his wall of cover. "What are we doin'? Shouldn't we wait 'til the Feds arrive? This's got OSS written all over it!"

    "I ain't sittin' by and waitin' for the OSS to get its head out its ass and hightail it out here! They'll only go and screw it up, anyhow!" shot back Dahteste. "Besides, Nogales might be a white man's town, but those lands out there have been Apache for generations! No one knows 'em better than I do."

    "You sure they ain't got a tracker with 'em?" asked Jackson, firing a few quick shots past the overturned table he'd ducked behind.

    The sheriff quickly stuck her head over the bar and surveyed the situation, before hiding again. "I count four. All in black, all wearing Día de los Muertos masks, something no Indian would be caught dead in. If they get out into that crowd and we can't keep track of 'em, they're gone."

    "I knew we should've called in OSS. This stuff's not supposed to happen anymore! The West ain't wild still!"

    "But boy does it feel great!" squealed Dahteste, firing a few more rounds. "Just like the good ol' days."

    The skull-faced men shouted a few things in Spanish as the two opposing parties returned fire. Then they each grabbed one of the many sacks of American and Brazilian banknotes they'd stolen earlier and dashed out of the room.

    "Goddammit. We've got a chase on our hands," growled the sheriff.

    The pair of lawmen sprinted out of the bar and strained to look above the colorful calacas and parade floats. Latin music and the cheers of partygoers flooded the streets. "There!" shouted Dahteste, pointing to a pair of the crooks slipping down a street to their left. Suddenly, a scream rang out to their right, and the sheriff and her deputy zeroed in on the other two skull men shoving through the crowd.

    "You follow those guys on the right!" commanded Dahteste. "I'm taking these two! We meet back here when they're in cuffs."

    "But--"

    "GO!"

    "Jesus, okay! Try not to die!"

    Dahteste dashed off and plowed through the hordes of celebrating Nogalesians. These days, Día de los Muertos was one of the most celebrated holidays in the United States, right up there with Christmas and Thanksgiving. It certainly outdid its strange little brother and main competition for the slot at the end of October, All Hallow's Eve, what those crazy New Englanders and even crazier Canadians called Halloween. And the formerly Mexican territory of Sonora proved to be the most popular vacation destination to celebrate it. Which was a bit of an issue for the sheriff.

    "One side! Move it! This is official business of the law!" she roared, but the swarming crowd drowned her out. "Oh, for Pedro's sake..." she muttered, pulling out her pistol and firing it at the air. People screamed and immediately cleared a path for her.

    Down the cobblestone streets she ran, just barely snatching a quick glimpse of her perps' black-and-silver get-ups. Dahteste rounded a hairpin turn and grinned as she saw the alley the skulls had taken refuge in was a dead end. That grin fell away as the two masked men clambered up the side of the building like insects, finding handholds on windowsills and gaps between bricks. The sheriff followed suit, and swung herself up to the Spanish roof characteristic of Sonoran structures. "A damn good thing I liked gymnastics when I was little," she grumbled, masterfully bouncing from tile to tile in hot pursuit.

    "She's still followin' us!" exclaimed one of the skulls.

    "So shoot her!" yelled the other.

    Dahteste slid behind a chimney just as a .45 caliber round impaled her hat and knocked it off, right where her heart had been an instant before. She launched a volley of her own as the crooks slid down a roof and vaulted the gap to another terracotta-topped building, and managed to clip the one wearing a turquoise mask in the shoulder.

    "Gah!" he spluttered, and collapsed. His pal didn't even so much as look at him, choosing to instead nab the other bag of banknotes and continue on his way.

    "Stay here," ordered the sheriff, quickly handcuffing the downed perp to the gutter and hopping over him.

    Precariously high over the main road below, the crook and cop entered the old part of town, the section that had been around when the conquistadores still roamed the land in search of gold. The skull finally ran into a dead end, though: a gap too far to leap, with a three story building on the other side, far to high to be able to grab the edge of the roof and pull himself up.

    "Hands in the air, buddy," Dahteste directed, grinding to a halt and pointing her gun at the masked man's back. "Fun's over. Take off the mask, give me the money and gun, and come down with me."

    The thief stood there for a moment, his scarlet skeleton mask haunting in the sallow light of the Moon. Then he jumped off the roof.

    "Fuck! No way in hell I'm having a Robert Johnson moment!" lamented Dahteste, leaning over the edge. She sighed when she saw her target a story below, bowling over people on his mad dash across the second floor balcony, and jumped from the roof herself to follow after. In a stroke of incredible luck, the skull slipped on someone's cape, and face-planted into the ground. One of the bags of money soared over the railing, banknotes went everywhere, like confetti, and the crowd below scrambled to grab them from the air.

    "End of the line," remarked Dahteste, cuffing the criminal.

    Two hours, a large avocado, and much confusion later, the sheriff and deputy stood in the former's office, which also happened to double as the town jail. All four would-be thieves had been caught and unmasked, though neither of the emissaries of the law recognized any of them. They certainly weren't from around Sonora, that's for sure.

    "We're gonna try this one last time: what are your names?" pressed Dahteste.

    "We've been at this an hour, Sheriff," complained Jackson. "They ain't gonna talk, plain as day."

    "We'll make them talk."

    "I don't think you'll be able to, Sheriff Jennings," a syrupy voice called out from behind them.

    Dahteste whirled around. Her eyes widened when she saw who it was. "You."

    "Me," laughed the woman.

    "I'm sorry... am I missing something here? Who are you?" asked Jackson.

    "Jackson Fitzpatrick, meet Maria Vazquez Guerrero, best detective in the Office of Strategic Services--the only female one, at that--and my ex-girlfriend."

    "Your what?" he gasped.

    "I'm homosexual. I like women. Feel free to hand in your badge if you don't like it, Deputy."

    "No, no, I don't really care about that sort of stuff. I was just surprised, is all," stated Jackson.

    "Good."

    Maria put her hand on her hip and said, "Sheriff Jennings, I'm here to take this case and these crooks from you. This is officially the business of the federal government and the OSS now."

    "The hell it is!" shot back Dahteste.

    "Watch your language, please. It's very unbecoming of you," Maria replied, before snapping her fingers and pointing at "Boys, come take these Día de los Muertos buffoons away."

    A few federal agents appeared from the shadows, unlocked the cells holding the thieves, and carted them away, kicking and screaming the whole time.

    "You're an ass, you know," grumbled Sheriff Jennings. "Wait, scratch that, your entire organization is an ass. My deputy and I chased down those goons ourselves, after they stole a shit ton of cash from a local bank. How in any way is this a federal matter? If we could just work with some goddamn freedom out here like we used to-"

    "Dahteste, we don't have that luxury anymore. The West isn't wild like the good old days. No more lone vigilantes saving towns from a Comanche raid or a KGC attack. No more duels at high noon in the town square. No more heroes. The frontier line's gone. President Weaver said it himself, this census marked the end of the first chapter of American history and the dawn of a new one. There's far more to this robbery than you realize. It's not just four idiots with guns and a gold fixation. It's just not that simple anymore," said the detective.

    "Then at least tell me why this is so important. I caught these guys. I'm sheriff of these parts. I deserve to know."

    "Fine. You ever heard of a guy named William McKinley?" she asked, and sighed as both Dahteste and Jackson shook their heads. "Well, McKinley is a big-time criminal up in Chicago. He was a crooked politician a while back, had his heart set on the presidency, but word got out and he was shunned from politics. But then he struck the big time. McKinley built an empire, and now he runs all the organized crime from Cleveland to Phoenix. We think he's making moves into Sonora and Colorado, and that's big. It means he's powerful enough to muscle into the turf of the Mexican crime families, which have been getting huge as their home country collapses. My God, I swear, we take down one Latin American dictator and another one just comes to replace him..."

    "Damn. That does seem to put me a bit out of my depth, Detective Guerrero," conceded Dahteste.

    "Mum's the word in regards to what I just told you. If it gets back to Director Churchill what I just told you, he'll have his best men on my ass, and that's bad news for both of us."

    Jackson and Dahteste nodded solemnly.

    "Well, I'd best be going. It was... okay seeing you again, Dah," the detective admitted.

    "You, too, I guess."

    "Write me?"

    The sheriff chuckled, as she led Maria out onto the street. "Maybe I will."

    Dahteste Jennings sighed, leaning up against the side of her station as Detective Guerrero saddled up her horse and rode off into the sunrise.

    --------------------------------

    [​IMG]

    Every nation on Earth has an origin story. Not the place where the country was birthed, be it from fire and sword or ink and quill, but where they found themselves. Where they truly embraced what made them unique from the rest of the world, what set them apart. For the British, it was the Victorian Age, when the Royal Navy ruled the waves and their empire controlled a quarter of the Earth's surface. For the Italian peoples, it was the days of the Roman Empire, when the Greeks, Egyptians, Israelites, Assyrians, Carthaginians, Turks, Celts, and more were under direct rule from the greatest city ever constructed, Rome. For the French, it was the era of Napoleon, when almost single-handedly, France went up against all of Europe, and nearly won.

    But for the United States, nothing quite pulled at the heartstrings like tall tales of cowboys and Indians, legends of gold rushes and cattle drives, stories of lone vigilantes and hardworking men and women who together to built a civilization in the harsh wilderness of the Rocky Mountains or the Mojave Desert. America had been constructing a mythology for decades, but nothing was more central to their true cultural independence from England than the Wild West.

    Beginning with the Treaty of Paris and the cession of the Northwest Territory from Britain to the US, America had always been on the border with a mostly untamed frontier. In those early days, when the people of the fair republic were still misguided in their treatments of the Indian and the slave, the drive West had often been a brutal affair, as the United States committed systematic genocide against the native peoples and their cultures. Still, though, the charge moved west, from the forests of Ohio and the Battle of Fallen Timbers to the bayous of the Gulf Coast and the Louisiana Purchase, which doubled the size of the Union. As the years went by, the West, though seemingly disconnected from the wheel of American politics, was an integral part of how the nation functioned. Conflicts arose, morphing from if slavery should be allowed to move West with the settlers to if slavery should be allowed at all. Then came the Mexican-American and Oregonian Wars, and just like that, the United States doubled its size again. But as the pioneers crossed the Oregon Trail and settled the Pacific Coast, the West still wasn't wild. At least, not as wild as it would become. Fighting with Native Americans gradually slowed, especially as the Civil War broke out, then ceasing altogether in 1885 after the Council of Little Bighorn and the Comanche Wars. But that's skipping a few things. Because, for a few golden years between 1860 and 1889, the West was well and truly Wild.

    [​IMG]
    The Battle of Fallen Timbers, August 20, 1794

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    Wagon trains of the Oregon Trail, ca. 1840s

    [​IMG]
    "Manifest Destiny"
    By John Gast (1877)

    The modern Wild West began in 1864, when the second Homestead Act was passed and the frontier was opened like never before. Having just come off the back of four years of a brutal war, a lot of veteran soldiers just couldn't cope with returning to normal everyday life. The passage of the Civil Rights Amendments had also given thousands of young women new independence and control over their lives that they'd never seen before. These two elements combined to create some of the roughest and readiest pioneers and frontiersmen the world had ever seen. But, in the Postbellum West things were significantly different than before the war as it pertained to Indian relations. Relations between the American Indian and the average white invader before the Civil War were... less than cordial. But after America got high on Revolutionary Spirit again in the 1860s, coexistence between Easterners and Indians started to become widespread, and the cultural melting pot of the Wild West became a little more complex.

    [​IMG]
    German settlers in Lakota, ca. 1886

    American migration West was sped up by a slew of gold rushes. Already, two gold rushes, the Georgia Gold Rush and the California Gold Rush, had made their mark on US history by facilitating Cherokee Nation v. Georgia and the Sunshine Revolutions. But by the 1860s, people were ready to pack up all their things again and try to make their fortune out West. Unlike in ye olden days, though, these fine prospectors didn't have to take a grueling ride on a wagon train across the barren Great Plains; by 1870, they could take one of many transcontinental railroad lines across the country and back in just a few days. This also quickened the pace of Westward expansion. Gold rushes rocked the North American continent, hitting Sierra in 1875, the Rockies within Hamilton, Shoshone, Dakota, and Oregon in 1879, and Pecos in 1883. Of course, little things like national boundaries did nothing to stop starry-eyed Americans from gold hunting elsewhere, as they flooded into British Columbia, the Yukon, and Russian Alyeska, pickaxes ready, at a second's notice.

    [​IMG]
    Prospectors searching for gold in the Black Foot River, Dakota Territory, ca. 1881

    [​IMG]
    Panning for gold in the Sierra Nevada Mountain Range, ca. 1875

    [​IMG]
    American, Canadian, and Russian miners ascend the Chilkoot Trail during the Klondike Gold Rush, ca. 1889

    Now, while some wild escapades on the pioneer frontier did really happen, they were few and far between. In reality, the image of the heroic cowboy, the friendly Indian, and the evil British or Knights of the Golden Circle is false, cooked up by "Bullseye" Bill Cody, one of the few true heroes of the Old West (among the likes of Wild Bill Hickok, George Armstrong Custer, Wyatt Earp, Geronimo, Sitting Bull, and Butch Cassidy). Cody was a true adventurer, and in 1876, he visited the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia. There, he saw the pavilion on the Wild West, which was constantly flooded with people from all over, from Frenchmen to Finns. In that moment, Cody knew there would be an enormous market for something that brought the Wild West east. So he went to work, and in 1879 in Salem, Oregon, the first of many Bullseye Bill's Wild West shows premiered. For over thirty years, the show crisscrossed the Union, with it also hopping the Atlantic, Pacific, and Caribbean more than a few times to tour Europe, Asia, and South America.

    [​IMG]
    1884 poster for Bullseye Bill's Wild West Show
    (Bill was also called "Buffalo", his Indian name, as granted by the Navajo in 1878)

    [​IMG]
    Bullseye Bill and Sitting Bull, ca. 1885

    But everything in the Wild West wasn't quite as fake as Bullseye Bill's traveling circus. No, between the Mississippi River and the Pacific Ocean was some of the richest, most beautiful untapped land left on Earth. Something needed to be done to preserve that land, lest it be lost for future generations to enjoy. So began the rise of American environmentalism. In 1871, the first of many federally controlled National Parks, Yellowstone National Park, was founded, taking up parts of land from Nebraska, Dakota Territory, and Shoshone Territory. The park was the first of it's kind in the world, and was swiftly followed up by the federal reclamation of Yosemite Valley and the Mariposa Grove of giant sequoias from California, who had been mismanaging the land since 1864, and creating Yosemite National Park in 1872. In reflecting its newfound partnership with the Native Americans of the West, in 1878 the United States agreed that all National Parks would allow (licensed) Indians to hunt on those lands, but only using traditional techniques (no guns) and in moderation, so as to not destroy the population of the animals protected in those parks. More National Parks soon followed, with Mackinac National Park in Superior in 1875, Sequoia National Park in California in 1878, Grand Canyon National Park in Arizona Territory in 1880, and Mount Rainier National Park in 1882. Following that rapid-fire creation of so many parks so quickly, the federal agency of the National Park Service was created to oversee and preserve the sanctity of the parks, and a period of stagnation in regards to conservation struck Congress.

    [​IMG]
    Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, Yellowstone National Park

    [​IMG]
    Yosemite Valley, Yosemite National Park

    Enter Theodore Roosevelt.

    Teddy Roosevelt did enjoy the great outdoors, but he also wanted to preserve them, to keep them beautiful. In 1884, having just come off of the Colombian War and single-handedly taken down a South American dictator, Teddy was the most famous man in America. People went crazy for him. So, when he said the government needed to support environmentalism in any way they could, people listened. In 1885, while visiting Yellowstone for the first time, TR was enchanted by its beauty. The following year, he and his friend William Tecumseh Sherman founded the Boone and Crockett Society, an organization that strove to protect and preserve what little frontier America still had left. The Society was wildly popular and gained thousands of members not only across the nation, but across the world, particularly Brazil, whose tens of thousands of acres of Amazon rainforest were in an acute need of protecting. As a result of this, environmentalism was added to the bloated roster of things the Federalist Party stood for, though as the years went by that segment of the party would become increasingly at odds with the part in support of big business.

    An adverse effect of the United States taming the Wild West was the slow loss of what some would say was its greatest feature: its egalitarianism. Out in the Old West, there was widespread support for homosexuality, something not seen anywhere else on globe. Men and women were free to love and be with whomever they chose, and, unlike gays and lesbians east of the Mississippi and west of the Rockies, did not face shunning from society. Unfortunately, as the frontier diminished and more conservative-minded people of higher class migrated westwards, this acceptance disappeared, bit by bit. It would take a miracle when, a few decades down the line, the fight for homosexual rights was reignited.

    In 1889, the new president proclaimed in his State of the Union address that the frontier line, according to the most recent US census, was gone, and the first chapter of American history was over. The brave men and women who tamed the Wild West were forever enshrined in the halls of the American consciousness. Because, as the republic stepped into a brave new world, it would need a little bit of nostalgia to handle the things to come.
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2019
  11. Goldwind2 Well-Known Member

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    Who is President Woodhull's seccoscor. I only heard him or her referred as president Weaver
     
  12. HeX Self-Proclaimed Disney Expert

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    I'm covering that soon. The timer on Federalist dominance is running out in the face of the Populists, which will be the subject of discussion in one of the next few updates.
     
  13. Unknown Member

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    Didn't see that twist coming (about McKinley--or Jennings, for that matter, not that there's anything wrong with that, to quote Seinfeld)...

    Good update, @HeX...
     
  14. Worffan101 Ain't done nothing if I ain't been called a Red

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    Crime boss McKinley? Awesome. Finally somebody does something fun with him!
     
  15. TheImperialTheorist To theorize & imagine worlds of possibilities.

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    I like the update regarding the Wild West and environmentalism, especially with the formation of national parks earlier than OTL, and I especially can’t wait to learn more about McKinley and other cronies. Will we see any mention of Carnegie, Rockefeller, J.P. Morgan, Vanderbilt, and other famous industrialists?

    Also, regarding the narrative section, I have a bit of criticism regarding the revelations of the sheriff’s homosexuality. I feel it’s a bit... tactless. Of course, this will be a more welcoming America, and its outlook on social issues compared to OTL’s America at the same time period would be more progressive, but outright acceptance of homosexuality is something I feel has yet to come into consideration in many American minds, much less actually be accepted. Plus, from a narrative point of view, it’s an unnecessary detail that sticks out and feels underdeveloped. I’m not saying that you should remove it or that homosexuals in general didn’t exist in the past. It’s just that such blatant revelations weren’t done with passion, even by someone who doesn’t tolerate bullshitters. I recommend a more nuanced approach to it, perhaps hinting at it throughout the dialogue and keeping it up in the air. I feel that would be the best reflection of American attitudes to homosexuality: there are hints of it occurring throughout society but no real confirmation of it.
     
  16. Cryostorm Monthly Donor

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    Glad to see Theodore Roosevelt helping spearhead American conservation and environmentalism. We're they able to keep the gray wolf, American bison, and passenger pigeon from going extinct or near extinct? How are feral horses like the mustang treated? Also will the Scouts or an analog be created soon, hopefully not split by gender this time?

    Edit: Also, if you have never been there you should definitely go to Yosemite. Went there for a week last year and enjoyed it though I know I only saw a portion. I plan to hit more since I finally have the money to make those trips worthwhile.
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2019
  17. Cryostorm Monthly Donor

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    Speaking of Populism, will the US have its spate of adding more direct democracy to the Constitution and will they go further this time? By further I mean removing the EC or passing something similar to the Apportionment Amendment,the twelfth Bill of Rights, to mandate the number of constituents per rep?
     
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  18. HeX Self-Proclaimed Disney Expert

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    All your favorite Robber-Barons will be featured prominently in the tales of the Gilded Age ITTL. And to make up for the rampant political corruption that so defined the OTL era, organized crime is going to be off the charts. Think 1920s Chicago, but everywhere. (Okay, not everywhere, but there will be a lot of crime bosses and crime families [including ol' Eyebrows McKinley] operating on a national scale.)

    I'm glad you brought this up. My reasoning for the outright acceptance of homosexuality this early on is that this sort of thing is only seen in the Wild West. Gay people in New Hampshire, or East Florida, or California would never openly admit to being homosexual, except for a very select few, because the culture east of the Mississippi and west of the Rockies just isn't ready for that sort of thing. However, in the Wild West, things are different. Since there was so little federal oversight, and since it was so many young people moving west alone to start a new life, societal and cultural rules there are far more egalitarian than anywhere else in the country. IOTL, this was reflected in the Western states giving women the right to vote long before the East did. ITTL, this is reflected in Western folk accepting homosexuality outright. Unlike with OTL suffrage, though, now that the West is no longer wild, that acceptance of gays and lesbians will slowly dwindle, before being rekindled during the 1940s and coalescing in a movement for full rights to homosexuals in the 1960s.

    Also, I don't really think I can develop any part of these characters in the ways you might expect. These are little short stories focusing on characters you're lucky to see again at all, and unless I devote three paragraphs talking about Dahteste's sexual orientation, it's going to feel unfulfilled. The characters I am able to give life to are historical ones, like Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, Andrew Jackson, Frederick Douglass, Teddy Roosevelt, and Winston Churchill. This is because you already know these people, and don't need a ton of backstory to care about them. It might be a little blunt, but... I dunno, all I can say is that it'll all get better soon.

    The gray wolf and passenger pidgeon are both still alive and, while I wouldn't say thriving, are certainly still around. The buffalo/bison, meanwhile, is a protected species that only Native Americans are allowed to hunt, and even then only in moderation. That's why I changed Buffalo Bill's name, since he didn't get famous for killing a bazillion buffalo ITTL. Not sure about the mustang, though.

    The Scouts are coming, and while they'll be under the same umbrella organization on paper, the Scouts will still be divided along gender lines, just because sending a bunch of middle school or high school boys and girls out camping in the woods together with limited supervision for weeks on end is kind of a bad idea. The two groups will all still learn the same things, though, and they'll all sell cookies.

    Yosemite seems like a great place, I will agree.

    Yes, but that's not going to happen for a long time yet. At this point ITTL senators are still elected by state legislatures, though that will soon change.
     
  19. Praying_to_a_gof Your lord & master Banned

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    Oh there goings my idea of President Edith Hoover
     
  20. TheImperialTheorist To theorize & imagine worlds of possibilities.

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    One of the main reasons behind the massive explosion of criminal empires was because of the Prohibition Amendment that banned the sale of alcohol. Would there be anything like that to help kickstart that massive influx of crime or will there be another reason behind it?

    Thank you very much for responding. Following your logic, I agree with the idea that the Wild West would be more welcoming to more counter cultural things like homosexuality than Eastern society. I also like the idea that once the Wild West became tamed, the acceptance faded away as the reach of high-class society expanded. Perhaps you should add that into the chapter? It would definitely expand the world a little.

    An interesting thing to note is that IOTL, lesbian couples were, while not the norm, seemed to be tolerated with the Boston marriages, as women seemed to live together without the appearance of a man. While not all were romantic nature, there were some notable ones and the practice Perhaps that is also done ITTL, with more of a romantic subtext that OTL?

    I still feel it’s a bit on the nose, but considering these are complements to the main story and aren’t allowed to have much expansion beyond short vignettes, I’m not all up-at-arms about it. I guess it does fit Dahteste’s blunt no-nonsense character, so there’s some comfort in that.
     
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