A More Perfect Union: An Alternate History of the Land of the Free

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: Before 1900' started by HeX, May 22, 2019.

Loading...
  1. thekingsguard Founder of Korsgaardianism

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2010
    Location:
    Virginia - near the USA-CSSA Border
    Teddy in the house

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Andrew Boyd Resident Rail Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2018
    Yeesh. The UK sounds like it is a lot worse than it was ever IOTL. Both home and abroad.
     
    Ironshark, Simeon and HeX like this.
  3. Andrew Boyd Resident Rail Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2018
    What's the state of Indiana up to ITTL?
     
    AeroTheZealousOne likes this.
  4. HeX Self-Proclaimed Disney Expert

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2018
    Location:
    Disneyland, U.S.A.
    Uh, it's existing. Doing Indiana... things. Nothing special. It's just Indiana.
     
  5. Andrew Boyd Resident Rail Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2018
    I would bring up some more of the Laughin' Place ideas I sent you. But that's probably better for conversations.

    Back to TTL, is French immigration to the US enough for there to be French cuisine as a popular one? At least to the scale of Italian and Chinese food.
     
  6. Albert Blake Gott Mit Uns

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2019
    Location:
    Britain
    Given the instability of France, immigration would be larger than OTL.
     
    Simeon likes this.
  7. HeX Self-Proclaimed Disney Expert

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2018
    Location:
    Disneyland, U.S.A.
    French immigration is certainly larger, but not close to the scale of Italian (well, Venetian, Sardinian, and Sicilian) and Chinese immigration.
     
  8. Andrew Boyd Resident Rail Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2018
    Anything else I could possibly contribute? Perhaps later on?

    BTW, I've been able to think of what I believe are some excellent ideas for your Laughin' Place TL.
     
  9. Israel_Dan the Man Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2017
    African colonization is going to be lovely.....

    In case you couldn’t tell, that was sarcasm
     
    Simeon, Wolttaire, 46566 and 2 others like this.
  10. 46566 Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2018
    Has India been talked about? I'm forgetting if it was fully under England yet. Does England have control of has it been split between England and France?
     
  11. Samsara123 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2017
    Well at least people can flee to US state of Liberia for a semblance of common human decency
     
  12. Samsara123 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2017
    Has Einstein moved to US yet if not Germany might get the first nuclear bomb
     
  13. Tales Weaver Just An Ordinary CItizen

    Joined:
    May 5, 2017
    Location:
    Kimpo, South Korea
    Any news in East Asia?
     
    Simeon and Whiteshore like this.
  14. Whiteshore Defender of Myrcella Baratheon

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2016
    Location:
    Philippines
    The Qing Dynasty has adopted Revolutionary Spirit and is a staunch American ally after the Americans helped them deal with the Taiping.
     
  15. Threadmarks: Redemption, Part Twelve: A Bridge Between Worlds

    HeX Self-Proclaimed Disney Expert

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2018
    Location:
    Disneyland, U.S.A.
    The word "continent" is needlessly confusing. Whether you're discussing geographic location, ethnolinguistic background, or even subterranean plates, it fails to truly encapsulate what makes each corner of the world unique from one another.

    Case in point: the Americas. Sure, they were distinct, though that distinction grew less and less prominent each passing day, as the United States adopted more and more of its Latin American neighbors' cultures and vice versa. They were definitely more separated than the nebulous border line drawn between Europe and Asia. But North and South America were connected, grasping hands and holding on tight as they hurtled through the chaos of the nineteenth century. This node was centered on the isthmus of Panamá, a lonely land separated from the rest of its home country, Gran Colombia, by thick jungle and treacherous mountain peaks. It was a bridge between worlds. And Colombia wanted to cut that bridge in half.

    [​IMG]
    President Mariano Ospina Rodríguez
    (b. 1805 -- d. 1884)

    During the American Civil War, nearly twenty years prior, Britain and France had propped up numerous dictators in Central America. These tyrannical leaders were deposed later during the Banana Wars, but Gran Colombia managed to weasel its way out of an American invasion by cutting all ties with Europe, thanks largely to the work of its brutal "president", Mariano Ospina Rodríguez. Rodríguez had, once upon a time, been a conspirator in the Noche Septembrina, the 1828 plot to overthrow Simon Bolívar. Most of his compatriots were captured and executed after they failed, but he managed to escape, fleeing to Peru and remaining there in self-imposed exile as Gran Colombia limped along. When the Civil War broke out and the Europeans entered the American-Brazilian sphere for the first time since the Latin American Wars of Independence, Rodríguez saw an opening. He quietly struck a deal with London and Paris that he would do everything in his power to stop the Americans, provided he be in total control of Gran Colombia. Of course, once the US and Brazil came knocking, Rodríguez swiftly changed sides, and managed to just barely stay in power, preying on the war-weariness of his foes. But President Mariano Rodríguez had made no shortage of enemies in his time as supreme dictator. One such adversary was none other than Theodore Roosevelt, globetrotter and explorer extraordinaire. Teddy was a veteran of the Banana Wars, and had never been very pleased with President Grant's decision to let Colombia go. He'd also achieved something of a national presence back home in America, enough that when he said he was going to take down Mariano Ospina Rodríguez, people listened.

    A lot of people.

    Teddy Roosevelt managed to raise an army of several thousand men, and even a few brave women, the first female soldiers to be admitted to serve in an American-sanctioned military operation ever. Their goal? To liberate the citizens of Gran Colombia, especially those unfortunate enough to live in the province of Panamá, where the locals were being forced into what amounted to slavery. Now, with slavery having been abolished nationwide for over nearly half a century by that point, no American citizen, even the Southerners, had a stomach for that. And while the United States government remained officially neutral on the subject, they were silently supplying copious amounts of aid to Teddy's "Filibuster for Freedom!" movement. It was time to take down a dictator.

    [​IMG]
    Theodore Roosevelt and the Rough Riders, 1883

    [​IMG]
    An 1883 photograph of F.F.F. volunteers shipping out from Miami to Habana, Cuba; rediscovered in 1898

    Theodore Roosevelt set out from Habana harbor on May 23, 1883 with a fighting force of ten thousand soldiers, nicknamed the Rough Riders, all jammed aboard a few ex-Navy ships out of service since the Civil War. A week later, on May 30, they arrived at the mouth of the Gulf of Venezuela, ready to kick some tail. They touched down in Maracaibo, which they besieged for three days before making landfall. The Americans were invading a divided country, so one could never be too sure who supported the Rodríguez administration and who didn't. Teddy had a "shoot first, ask questions later" mentality, which meant a lot of suspicious but perfectly innocent bystanders were unfortunately but inevitably killed. Setting up headquarters in the city, the American filibuster set out in three separate directions, all aiming for the final destination of Bogotá, capital of Gran Colombia. For the next five months, the Rough Riders chugged through the South American rainforest in a war unlike any other. Echoing the battle tactics of the Indian, the Americans gave up any attempt at fighting a "gentleman's war" and got down and dirty, taking to the trees and trenches to get the upper hand. Roosevelt, having survived years by his lonesome in the Dakota frontier and the African wilderness, took to the terrain like fish to water. He spearheaded the most important charge, setting out from Maracaibo and on through Valledupar, Sincelejo, and Monteria. When he arrived in Carepa, though, he found something he just couldn't stomach: Panamanian slaves, being worked to the bone. After the Rough Riders broke up the scene, though, something in Teddy snapped. The Colombian War, as the folks back home were calling it, had evolved. It wasn't just a war of liberation anymore. It was a war of conquest.

    The canary-yellow colors of the Rough Riders' uniforms became a symbol of freedom in the Hispanic world, just as much as the Brazilian flag or the German eagle. When Theodore Roosevelt and his band of merry men crossed the tops of hills, waving the American Stars and Stripes high, Panamánians and Colombians alike cheered, dropped their tools, and rebelled against Rodríguez's tyrannical rule and his scheme to construct a canal connecting the Atlantic to the Pacific. On September 4, 1883, they crossed into Panamá City, which had faced major civil unrest since the Rough Riders left the Port of Habana. It collapsed completely within six hours, and all supporters of Rodríguez were disgracefully ejected. Teddy and his Rough Riders celebrated there for two consecutive nights, and laid the groundwork for the creation of the República de Panamá, which existed only as a gateway to statehood.

    But as the Filibuster for Freedom stampeded across the Colombian countryside, fierce debate raged in the halls of Congress. While filibustering had been discussed before, notably under the Grant Administration in regards to potentially annexing Dominica and Haiti, it had never occurred in such an obvious manner before. Certainly, California and Yucatán were the products of a kind of filibustering, but nothing as blatant as a Banana Wars-veteran toppling a foreign government single-handedly and propping up a part of said foreign government as a makeshift nation with the sole goal of being annexed by the United States of America. The Panamánian Question was the first major dispute to rock Congress since before the Civil War, as the era of Federalist domination began to waiver in the face of the rising threat of populism. Needless to say, the Federalist Party was pro-annexation, and the Populist Party was against it. The terminally-ill Democratic-Republican Party, still fielding one senator and six representatives, also opposed annexation, though on the grounds that the US didn't need any more "undesirables" (read: non-whites) in its borders, but their voice hardly mattered. They were speaking to a deaf crowd. Victoria Woodhull's extremely radical policies were also enough to drag more common white folks into the Populist camp, though the Federalist Party would remain the party of blacks, Hispanics, Asians, and women for as long as the Earth kept spinning. But the voice of the average white man was loud, and would lead to the first major political discourse in decades, especially when America had to decide whether to continue constructing Rodríguez's "Panamá Canal" or not.

    Federalist votes simply outweighed those of their new rival, though, and President Woodhull wholeheartedly supported the annexation of Panamá, as did the locals. By that point, Theodore Roosevelt was on the outskirts of Bogotá. On October 19, he and the Rough Riders charged into Gran Colombia's capital. The city was beautiful, a product of Hispanic elegance, Native American ingenuity, and forced Panamánian labor. By the end of the battle a month later, it was reduced to rubble and ash, like the Biblical metropolises of Sodom and Gomorrah. "President" Mariano Ospina Rodríguez was imprisoned, as were his court and generals, and a new government was installed, one that both Simón Bolívar and Alexander Hamilton would be proud of. Gran Colombia, now officially renamed the Republic of Nuevo Granada, was remade in the image of the United States and Brazil (to whom a small bit of Colombia land was granted). With the advent of new technologies like the telegraph, communication was now instant and no longer required weeks of courageous venturing into the jungle to hand-deliver messages, nor the division of the massive nation into three smaller segments. Julián Trujillo Largacha was named president after a speedy national election, and he just as quickly established himself as a hardline liberal, in the same boat as Abraham Lincoln or Frederick Douglass. All's well that ends well, one might say.

    [​IMG]
    Battle of Bogotá, 1883

    Except, it didn't. Because Theodore Roosevelt had just catapulted himself and the Rough Riders into the international spotlight. He would continue to explore the world, to leave no stone unturned in the deserts of Asia, the jungles of Indochina, the mountain slopes of Africa, and the waters of the Caribbean. But, sometime in the future, he wouldn't be able to ignore the call of politics any longer. He would have to answer that call, as he would always and forever answer to the call of the wild.
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2019
  16. Ismaili777 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2019
    Very nice, how fast might technological advancements?
     
  17. HeX Self-Proclaimed Disney Expert

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2018
    Location:
    Disneyland, U.S.A.
    Well, everything's about on the same level as OTL, but I'll get into that more once we hit alt-WWI and planes, cars, and tanks.
     
  18. Ironshark Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2018
    Teddy motherfucking Roosevelt

    Now Teddy’s in a good position to run for his OTL position of governor of New York or maybe even become the first governor of Panama


    Something interesting about teddy is despite his rough guy image he was one of the few presidents that actually LIKED the job and was definitely ambitious politically as well as personally
     
  19. Cryostorm Monthly Donor

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2012
    Location:
    Charleston, SC United States of America
    Theodore Roosevelt is definitely one of the most interesting presidents the US had, even by modern standards he held some very progressive stances such as environmentalism and corporate responsibility. Another thing is he was likely one of the first real proponent of the imperial presidency on the fact that it is the only office every citizen can vote on which usually gives it a level of legitimacy above even Congress. If any President has a chance of breaking the two term rule Theodore is your man.

    Also will this be the last of the Rough Riders' adventures or are there more places yearning for freedom that could use assistance?
     
  20. HeX Self-Proclaimed Disney Expert

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2018
    Location:
    Disneyland, U.S.A.
    Teddy's definitely going to be a major player in American politics rather soon. Due to the natural pushback against the Federalists that will occur after Redemption, though, he won't become president until after his OTL term. He's going to live longer too.

    I think this'll be the first and last time the original Rough Riders will ride, though I might change that at a later date. However, in the future, when America gets itself involved in foreign conflicts overseas, the troops there will be officially termed the Rough Riders.
     
Loading...