A More Perfect Union: An Alternate History of the Land of the Free

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: Before 1900' started by HeX, May 22, 2019.

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  1. Divergent54 Boris Johnson x Nigel Farage xoxo

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    I'm just tossing out ideas right now but an easier divergence would probably have a libertarian-socialist revolution either within the Ottoman empire or within the Bedouin peoples to seperate church and the state.

    And multiethnic Ottoman Socialist Republic has never been done before . . .
     
  2. Wolttaire Well-Known Member

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    honesty due to just how far back the pod is the Saudis tribe mostly likely will never have a chance to arise to be a major force and ally with Wahhabismist clerics and will not be able to spread it across the world to spread their a brand of Islam so it already been mostly butterflied away.

    @HeX this is an amazing story, thank you for writing!
     
  3. HonestAbe1809 Abraham Lincoln 2020

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    At this point, the most liberal view of non-straight people would likely be "if it's done in the privacy of their home and it's not hurting anyone leave them alone". Tolerance of openly non-straight people will come later but hopefully sooner than OTL.

    If the Philippines is ever annexed by America they could go through the same obsession with Chinese culture that mainland America is. A Republic of the Philippines with a considerable Chinese community is the most likely result of this.
     
  4. HeX Self-Proclaimed Disney Expert

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    Well, yeah, it will exist. But it'll be very, very suppressed, and confined solely to a region of the west Arabian coast, for reasons I can't get into yet.

    Teddy's coming soon, complete with the Rough Riders Expansion DLC, priced at just $17.76.

    I plan on covering it later, but baseball at the moment is enjoying the same wild popularity in the US as OTL. But baseball is also spreading around the world to American-aligned nations, and leagues will soon be springing up not just in North America, but in Brazil, China, Germany, Greece, the Italian States, and other places. Basketball will be popular in the Western Hemisphere, but not so in the Old World. As for the two footballs, soccer will be confined mostly to Britain and her allies, and will struggle to spread to European colonies in Africa, as soccer will be a symbol of oppression. Gridiron football won't take off until after alt-WW1, when there's less of a burning hatred between America and Britain. Baseball and gridiron football together will supplant the OTL soccer as the world's most popular sports with global leagues and billions of fans.
     
  5. Praying_to_a_gof Your lord & master Banned

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    A More Perfect Union has gotten worse after they start adding microtransactions
     
  6. Cryostorm Monthly Donor

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    Just having a more powerful and influential Persia/Iran would do that. Better if the rest of the of the Arab world does better as well, or even if the Al-Saud family never gain the Hedjaz which would mean that Wahabism would have less states support and funding.

    Hex, how will Arab nationalism, and Pan- Arabism, shape up? Would the US and Germany help set up an Arabia spanning from Egypt to Iraq and Syria to Yemen or would they try to keep it broken apart, and actually help the Kurds as well.

    As for Jewish nationalism I could see Germany and the US becoming the unofficial homelands of the Jewish people since both would be home to the vast majority of Jews, especially if France, Russia, and Britain persecute them, but I don't think they would support the creation of Israel in the Palestine region, though maybe a chunk could be cut off Russia, like Crimea, to make a new homeland as recompense.
     
  7. Cryostorm Monthly Donor

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    I think soccer will still have some popularity since it is probably the cheapest game to play, you just need something round to kick, which gives it an edge in poorer areas which is the reason it entered the US with German and Irish immigrants and would likely see a large following in China. What you would see is no FIFA for a long time and American and German rules being more widespread earlier in the game.
     
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  8. HeX Self-Proclaimed Disney Expert

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    True, true. But I do think that basketball could pick up some of the slack as a "poor man's game", since public parks are likely to put up a hoop everyone can use. But yeah, soccer will still see some popularity, but the big bucks will be in baseball and gridiron football.
     
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  9. Cryostorm Monthly Donor

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    Just avoid the whole rigged World Championship and get it where there are true international championships for both and that could easily come into being. Though I think to get Gridiron globally popular somethings should be tweaked to make it cheaper for schools and clubs to enter into the game, maybe it keeps the cheaper leather uniforms, and touch or flag rules, for non-professional leagues? That would make it easier for poorer schools and areas to get the feeder systems needed to succeed, and drive popularity.
     
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  10. Israel_Dan the Man Well-Known Member

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  11. Whiteshore Defender of Myrcella Baratheon

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    Or even if the Rashidis defeat them in Nejd.
     
  12. Andrew Boyd Resident Rail Enthusiast

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    I always said DLC was rubbish most of the time.
     
  13. farmerted555 Well-Known Member

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    I think this DLC will be worth the price.
     
  14. Samsara123 Well-Known Member

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    The reason wahabism got so big began when britain and France promised the moderate arab leader Hussein Bin Ali that they will assist him and his people to unify the arab parts of the middle east in exchange for rebelling against the Ottoman empire(this is where laurence of Arabia is from), but Britain and France backstabbed the nascent arab kingdom in the Sykes-Pikos Agreement and partioned most of the middle east between themselves, Bin Ali jilted by being betrayed refused to ask for international assistance and was slowly overwhelmed by the house of Saud and the Wahabists and conquered Mecca and Medina which were the spiritual capital of the muslim world, using their influence they were able to introduce more and more ultra-conservative ideas into mainstream islam to where Islam is such a clusterfuck it is today cause as usual GREED.

    So in this timeline Bin Ali knowing that he couldn’t trust the British and French decide to turn to the rising nation of America(who already has some muslim sympathies) for backing and assistance with promises of alliance between mutual enemies
     
  15. catatonia Member

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    "I'll leave you both to it, then," said Douglass. (From chapter “United We Stand, Part One.”)


    This is a great timeline and I love how you slip in lines from the musical.
     
  16. Ironshark Well-Known Member

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    That reminds me why didn’t Douglass run after Lincoln’s term and before grant?
     
  17. Threadmarks: Redemption, Part Eleven: The Scramble for Africa

    HeX Self-Proclaimed Disney Expert

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    Africa's nickname is the Dark Continent. The title has a twofold meaning, referring to both the coffee color of its inhabitants' skin, and the fact that the Western World knew little to nothing about what the mysterious land just to Europe's south might hold within it. The landmass' northern reaches had been an integral part of European politics since Alexander the Great conquered Egypt, but what lay below the vast sands of the Sahara Desert was unknown and uncharted, save a few coastal lands begun by the British and the Portuguese, the kings of colonization. But as the rest of the globe was mapped, as trade routes were sailed and continents were conquered, Africa's interior became the next in a long line of low-hanging fruit to be picked in Europe's Age of Discovery.
    The inciting incident that launched the West into an era of New Colonialism was the marriage to end all marriages: the wedding of Princess Stephanié of Belgium and Prince Rudolf of Germany. Belgium had been in a tense state of neutrality since the Franco-German War, flip-flopping between siding with the former and the latter. Belgian King Leopold II made the most astute observation in figuring Germany to be far more stable going into the future than France, which had been yet to fully recover from the effects of the French Commune and the underground Communist movement that blossomed right under King Henri V's nose. And when Henri was thrown from his horse in 1882 and broke his neck, killing him instantly, and the French Royal Family changed houses for the third time in twenty years when Orléanist King Philip VII came to the throne, Leopold's observation was made fact. Germany and Belgium were joined at the hip, and Leopold's kingdom became yet another ally of America and a thorn in the side of Great Britain. However, the adverse effect of such an action was the Netherlands allying itself to Britain and France, terrified of being swallowed whole by a German-Belgian invasion. The American rogues gallery gained another face on its wall.

    An unforeseen problem for Belgium arose after the wedding, however. With their alliance with the Germans more than solidified, the kingdom lost any chance of becoming a "great power", especially as Leopold's immense racism became apparent. Belgium became seen as a second-rate nation, a wannabe Germany, a child one should entertain, but ultimately pat on the back and send them on their way. Any Belgian colonial ambitions were killed prematurely, and they couldn't exactly reverse their actions that had led them in such a direction. But the marriage of Rudolf and Stephanié didn't just accidentally screw over Belgium. It inadvertently sparked the biggest colonial race seen since the sprint for the New World in the 1500s.

    Many Western countries had intruded into Africa's tranquil sphere of isolation prior to 1882. Spain had many enclaves in Morocco that had been around for over three centuries, Portugal was actively diving deeper into Angola and Mozambique, France was entrenched deep in Algeria, the United States' territory of Liberia was on the road to statehood, and the United Kingdom--lord of global imperialism--had held control over the Cape Colony since 1795, and invaded then subsequently purchased the Khedivate of Egypt from the Ottoman Empire in 1881, the latter action only taken in an attempt to preserve the wavering alliance between the two countries. But most nations--even those allied to each other--had overlapping claims on the continent, ones that could spark a war, potentially a global one. A solution was needed. So, for the time being, the countries of Great Britain, the United States, France, Germany, the Netherlands, the Two Sicilies, Spain, Greece, Portugal, Denmark, Russia, Brazil, Sardinia, Belgium, and Sweden-Norway set aside their differences and sit down and discuss things like gentlemen. Japan, China, the Ottomans, Venice, and Hungary were all granted observing seats, and not even every power at the dealing table was expected to walk away with concessions. The city of Rome, under control of the solidly neutral (if weakening) Papal States, was the designated location of the congress. So ensued the Rome Conference of 1882.

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    Rome Conference of 1882

    If the San Francisco Conference had drawn an all-star cast, then the attendees of the Rome Conference was the stuff of dreams, or nightmares, depending on your politics. The United States and the United Kingdom accepted the joint position of chairmanship, so as to not bruise one or the other's ego. Then came the plans. The mind-bogglingly complex, confusing, and overlapping plans. Britain's was simple enough: they already held control over Egypt and South Africa, so they simply wished to connect the two colonies by taking the Nile Basin, most of eastern Africa, and Rhodesia. Trouble was, Portugal wanted to connect it's own pre-existing colonies, Angola and Mozambique, by getting their hands on Rhodesia themselves. While every nation present at the Conference supported the latter's ambition, Britain took the Portuguese behind the scenes and implied they might leave them out to dry if they didn't support British plans. Portugal quickly dropped any trans-African dreams, and Britain was awarded Rhodesia. The United Kingdom gained almost all its claimed land, including Nigeria, a portion of Somaliland, the Nile Basin, Kenya, the lands surrounding Lake Victoria, the western half of Tanzania, Rhodesia, and South Africa.

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    The Pillars of Anglo-Portuguese Colonialism are rocked by the enslaved native peoples

    Germany and France were Europe's other big colonizers, and it showed. Germany claimed the whole of central Africa in a plan they called "Mittelafrika", while the French wanted everything from the Lake Chad Basin to Morocco. Germany also had a growing presence around the Gulf of Arguin. France, deemed a bit unstable even by its closest allies, was ultimately one of the biggest losers at the Conference in comparison to its grand ideas. Morocco was given to Spain, France was shut out of West Africa save for a tiny strip in Bénin, and Germany walked away with the jackpot: all of the Congo Basin, Kamerun and Equitorial Africa, a large swath of the northwestern coast (most of which was barren desert, but still), Namibia, and the small part of East Africa not already claimed by Britain. Algeria, Tunisia, the Chad Basin, Eritia, and Madagascar were all that France managed to snatch up. Spain, whose empire had been limited to just Puerto Rico and the Philippines following the Latin American Wars of Independence, was the unforeseen victor of the conference, unexpectedly being granted Morocco, Rio del Oro, and parts of Equitorial Africa and Somaliland. Those lands, as well as New Guinea and many Pacific islands, put Spain back on the map as an up-and-coming world power, somewhere on the same power scale as their sibling Portugal.

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    French romanticization of the brutal colonization of Algeria

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    A German explorer meets with the local Pygmies in Kamerun, ca. 1889

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    Frenchmen land on the coasts of Tunisia, ca. 1884

    The Republican Kingdom of the Two Sicilies also took home some prime real-estate, the former Ottoman holding of Libya. Though the British-held island of Malta separated the Italian peninsula from North Africa, it was a great achievement for the Sicilians nonetheless.

    The United States was an unexpected major player in the affairs at the Rome Conference. Aside from supporting their allies' claimed territory and playing a major role in awarding Germany the Congo Basin and Sicily all of Libya, they came into the conference with a steeled determination to be delegated as much land as possible. This was not because of a sudden resurgence of Manifest Destiny; in fact, Manifest Destiny's breadth had shrunken considerably. No, it was because of how worried President Woodhull and her administration was about the rampant human rights violations likely to arise in British, French, and Spanish colonies. Therefore, they reasoned, if America could stake a claim in, say, most of West Africa, the native peoples there would be spared the wrath of the evils of European colonialism. Luckily, both Germany and Sicily had promised to treat the locals under their jurisdiction with the utmost respect (I.E. they promised no genocide or forced overwork, but forced population resettling was still regrettably allowed, if used infrequently), but that wouldn't be anything close to enough. So, the United States delegates to the conference arrived with a map that colored all the lands from Guinea to the border with Kamerun red, white, and blue. They knew they wouldn't get all of that territory, but by making their eyes bigger than their stomachs, they were able to convince the Rome Conference to let them get away with what they actually wanted: Sierra Leone, the Ivory Coast, Volta, Ghana, and Togoland, wedged between German Mauritania, French North Africa, British Nigeria, and the Liberia Territory. To solidify American presence in the region, Liberia became a state in 1883, the following year.

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    Territory of Ghana, ca. 1883

    In the West African Territories (the United States refused to call them "colonies", which implied an unequal treatment of the natives and a vampiric policy of sucking the lands dry of resources to benefit the homeland), new foreign policy was experimented with. Congress passed the Manifest Destiny Act of 1882, which specified that lands annexed into the Union outside of the Northwestern Hemisphere beginning in 1882 were subject to ten years of American rule, followed by five years of native jurisdiction with American oversight, after which the territories could choose to either become a state or an independent nation. The system would work beautifully, not just for Africa but for later additions to the American sphere of influence as well.

    A few of the nations with seats at the table made off with next to nothing. Sardinia was granted a rather empty part of eastern Somaliland, and Denmark and the Netherlands made off with a segment of Somaliland and a part of the West African coast, respectively. Some attending countries got diddly-squat, these being Russia, Brazil, Hungary, Greece. Belgium, and Sweden-Norway. Japan had rather erroneously laid claim to Madagascar, something no country even brought up outside of a few jokes.

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    Colonial subjects who attempted to fight back against British colonization

    A new era of exploration followed. Hundreds of British, American, French, German, Spanish, Sicilian, and Portuguese adventurers blazed paths of fame through the Sahara and beyond. Perhaps the most famous of these voyagers was a young man from New York City, who had grown up stifled by asthma and a high-class lifestyle: one Theodore Roosevelt. Born on October 27, 1858, Theodore--known by his friends as "Teddy"--was debilitated as a child by his poor health and asthma. His family regularly vacationed to exotic locales when he was young, including tours of Europe in 1869 and 1870, Egypt in 1872, and China in 1874. While hiking in the Alps with his family, Teddy found he could keep pace with his father; he had discovered that physical exertion had the benefit of curbing his asthma and bolstering his spirits. He took up boxing and baseball as hobbies, and began a strict and intense exercise regimen.

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    Theodore Roosevelt out West, ca. 1880

    In 1877, Teddy joined the Army, and shipped off to liberate Central America from Anglo-French tyranny. Following the war, he desired escape, and set up a vast ranch in the untamed Dakota Territory in 1879. While out West, Teddy's love of nature, which had been growing within him since he was a young boy, was solidified, as was his appreciation for the native tribes of the Americas. In 1880, Teddy disappeared one night while out hunting wild game, and wasn't seen again for nine months. He was pronounced dead, and his family even held a funeral for him. Then, over half a year later, Theodore Roosevelt came stumbling out of the woods near his former ranch, which was now under the management of his father. As it turned out, Teddy had wandered off the beaten path that night he'd gone missing and came face-to-face with a massive black bear. He was mauled by it, coming close to death (though he managed to shoot the bear dead, as the later stories would tell), but was discovered by a local band of Sioux and nursed back to health. Teddy decided to remain with the tribe after he was made better, and wound up staying another eight months after he recovered. When he got back home, he told his father to keep the ranch. That day, Theodore Roosevelt pronounced that he wouldn't just be the son of a rich man anymore. He would forge his own path, explore and discover the vast secrets the world held within it. And, whenever he could, he would help out, to make Planet Earth a better place. Theodore Roosevelt decided to venture into America's new holdings in West Africa first, and he spent the better part of 1882 and '83 there. But then he decided to go see the Amazon Rainforest, and Gran Colombia. And it wasn't just to explore.

    Teddy was going to save Gran Colombia from the dictator on its makeshift throne. And he was taking volunteers.

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    Map of the World in 1883, after the Rome Conference
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2019
  18. HeX Self-Proclaimed Disney Expert

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    I figured that Redemption would need to be ingrained a little more to justify America electing its first black president. Plus, the poetic justice of having said first black president being elected on America's Centennial was too great to pass up.
     
  19. Carismastic Active Member

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    Will we be getting a map to see the division of Africa?
     
  20. AeroTheZealousOne Forever in debt to your priceless advice

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    YES! Danke Gott that the Belgians and King Leopold couldn't get their grubby little hands on the Congo. When you consider all the terrible $#!7 that went down there IOTL, this is a reason to celebrate.

    Africa looks considerably more humanely treated than OTL because America, but we all know it's not perfect and colonialism is still bad. That said, at least the United States is making an effort to mitigate human rights abuses, and in the nineteenth century, too!

    Oh look, the Brits took on to Belgium's most infamous policy on dealing with the natives IOTL. Shame on them.

    The below quote is something I thought you'd like to see, considering it'll eventually be relevant, even if it isn't right now.

     
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