A More Perfect Union: An Alternate History of the Land of the Free

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: Before 1900' started by HeX, May 22, 2019.

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  1. Whiteshore Defender of Myrcella Baratheon

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    I'm gonna take a guess that their King is some local aristocrat who was involved in the nationalist movement.
     
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  2. BustedMammon Member

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    I think it is interesting having Britain help the Confederacy but I feel like they'll still lose a lot quicker than in OTL, Once the Union finds out that the British helped the Confederates...well then Canada is gonna get a beating.
     
  3. Murica1776 Building an American Tomorrow

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    Good Lord it's the Civil War! Can't wait to see how this goes. That being said, I do have one question. Why did NC secede? IOTL, the state was heavily split between the Union and the Confederacy, and only split with the Union after Virginia seceded, leaving them surrounded. Shouldn't Virginia staying loyal butterfly NC as well?
     
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  4. BustedMammon Member

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    It is mostly for balancing purposes, I assume there are Union rebels in NC but probably not as many as in OTL.
     
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  5. HeX Self-Proclaimed Disney Expert

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    First and foremost, it's largely for balancing reasons, as @BustedMammon said. But also, keep in mind that this Civil War, while very similar to our own, is definitely not the same conflict. Freeing the slaves is one thing, and civil rights is another. I think it's much easier to mount an argument against slavery than segregation (it's much easier to "justify" that whites are more intelligent than blacks than it is to claim black people aren't really even human) and I highly doubt that people in North Carolina around this time would accept the latter, even in this much more accepting TL. Long story short, NC is still racist, VA only stayed with the Union because the secessionist sect of its legislature was arrested and the state is under martial law in a lot of parts.

    Hope that's a good enough explanation.
     
  6. Murica1776 Building an American Tomorrow

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    Thank you! I'll admit I might have caught on to that more if I had more than skimmed the most recent updates, as I decided to read them on the way to the gym, lol. That definitely makes sense especially from a balancing perspective. We did provide some 1/6th of the Confederacy's manpower even as we had tons of Unionists fighting out in Appalachia.
     
  7. BustedMammon Member

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    I assume there will be a post later today since it's 3:30 EST. Can't wait!
     
  8. HeX Self-Proclaimed Disney Expert

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    Unfortunately, there won't be a post today, I've just been too busy the last two days. I'll have an update tomorrow, though!
     
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  9. Joriz Castillo Well-Known Member

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    It better be good.
     
  10. Narissa Confused

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    When hasn’t it been?
     
  11. Ismaili777 Well-Known Member

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    What direction might this TL's American Culture go?
     
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  12. BustedMammon Member

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    Probably very diverse seeing as America will either reach or go past Central America which means they'll basically control all of North America. They will also have influence in Asia, Europe and Africa it seems.
     
  13. HeX Self-Proclaimed Disney Expert

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    American Culture is going to be a real mishmash. Most cuisine will be fusions of two dishes from two different cultures, so you might be getting a traditionally Asian dish with a Latin flair, etc. Words from other languages will work their way into American vernacular, just as they did IOTL. There will be substantially more Chinese/Japanese/Korean influence along the Pacific Coast. Native American cultures will be less obscure as well.

    Movies won't be mentioned until like the 1910s ITTL, but I can elaborate on sports a bit right now. Basically, there will be an all-out war of influence between the Brits and the US pretty soon, something like a cold war but not really a cold war. That will expand to sports, and pretty soon American baseball and British football will be spread globally. However, where one sport picks up the other tends to not get as big, or not stick at all. Both North and South America will be baseball bastions, due to the substantial American and Brazilian influence there.
     
  14. BustedMammon Member

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    I wonder more about religion then, could a sect closer to the original form of Christianity which a few people link to Christian Anarchism, form in this world? It seems there will he heavy amounts of right wing religious nuts still in the South but could the North or America in general see a rise in Christian Anarchism, Christian Pacifism, etc?
     
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  15. HeX Self-Proclaimed Disney Expert

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    The North ITTL is still riding out the Second American Enlightenment, which won't officially end until alt-Reconstruction does in the 1880s. As a result, the North embraces deism, the type of Christianity men like Ben Franklin practiced during the American Revolution and the First American Enlightenment, basically saying God created the universe, then left it alone, sans for his more minor interventions chronicled in the Bible. In other words, God and Jesus exist, but they don't actively interfere with Early ongoings.
     
  16. Threadmarks: United We Stand, Part Three: The Art of War

    HeX Self-Proclaimed Disney Expert

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    "The bonds of friendship between the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, the French Empire, and the United States of America have been forever severed. The tyrants of Britannia have forced my hand, but have shown their true two-faced ways. The Union does not declare war. But we firmly declare that Britain shall never again receive an ounce of aid, nor the hands of helpfulness."
    -- President Abraham Lincoln, upon the discovery of Britain's 'peacekeeping intervention' in the American Civil War

    "The Union forever
    Hurrah, boys, hurrah!
    Down with the traitor
    Up with the stars!
    While we rally round the flag, boys
    Rally once again
    Shouting the battle cry of freedom!
    "
    -- Chorus to The Battle Cry of Freedom

    "Oh, I wish I was in Dixie, Hooray! Hooray!
    In Dixie land I'll take my stand
    To live and die in Dixie!
    Away, away, away down south in Dixie!
    Away, away, away down south in Dixie!
    "
    -- Chorus to Dixie's Land

    --------------------------------​

    The end of 1861 was not, as much of the nation had hoped, the end of the war. Promises of the conflict being over by Christmas on both sides, Confederate and Union, proved to be laughably false. In fact, things were getting ready to be kicked up a notch.

    General Grant had retreated back to Dayton by July 22 after his defeat at Hamilton, and nervously awaited General Longstreet's arrival. Troops were flooding in from all over, Ohio especially, as Dayton was just a little over seventy miles from Columbus, the state capital. But it still wasn't enough. Immigrants fresh off the boat from Europe, who were fully-fledged US citizens, considered the conflict as being not their fight. Washington didn't quite see it that way, and were all but forcing the immigrants into blue uniforms. It was slow going, but it was better than nothing. No matter where in Europe the new people came from, they all harbored a dislike of the war, all of them except the Irish. Abraham Lincoln had made all the secession notices public in hopes of stirring up the hearts and minds of the Northern people, and South Carolina's declaration that they would reinstall slavery certainly emptied Boston, New York, and Philadelphia of their able-bodied young men. But, a captured letter between General Bragg and Vice-President Breckinridge was also released to the newspapers, and revealed the two men joking about making Irishmen slaves, as they were "drunken, bumbling idiots who still believe in elves and fairies."

    Longstreet took his time on the way to Dayton, allowing his men to plunder many a small town. On July 27, though, the city arrived on the horizon. Grant fought furiously once more, and, for a time, seemed to be winning, with about three-quarters of Longstreet's forces on the run. But then, the missing troops struck Grant's men from behind, sandwiching him between a rock and a hard place he had not expected to be in. The northern flank of the Army of South Carolina had swung all the way around Grant's camp under the cover of darkness one night, with the intent of attacking from behind. The plan, on Longstreet's part, worked beautifully. Grant escaped, thankfully, along with the majority of his men, though about six hundred were captured by the Confederates as the Army of the Ohio fled on August 1. By this point, Abraham Lincoln was getting disgruntled at Grant's streak of losses. The President, on August 3, sent a letter to where Major General Ulysses S. Grant was shacking up in Columbus, which, in essence, told him that if he lost one more major city in Ohio to the blasted Confederates, he could kiss his command goodbye. Steeled by such news, Grant set about fortifying the state capital as if the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse were coming alongside Longstreet. Civilians all mobilized, too, and any man with a gun and two working legs joined up as volunteers. Many young women cut their hair and disguised themselves as male, joining the battle as well. In total, eighty percent of the city's population was in some way directly involved with its defense.

    The Battle of Columbus began on the sweltering summer's day of August 8, 1861. Fifty thousand troops under the command of General Longstreet marched from the south headlong into General Grant's seventy-five thousand soldiers, having finally obtained all the men he was due, meeting at seven AM. What followed was the bloodiest single day of the entire war, and of American history. In one-hundred-and-three degree heat--the hottest day on record for central Ohio--thirteen thousand Union soldiers and eleven thousand Confederate soldiers lost their lives in the scramble for Columbus. Dozens collapsed due to the heat alone. The women of the city who hadn't decided to masquerade as men helped on that front immensely, running buckets of water from the town to the battlefield and back again. The Confederacy, at this point deep in enemy territory, had no such luxury, which resulted in about one thousand of their men dying from heatstroke, not just Yankee bullets. During the course of the battle, Grant had two horses shot out from under him, but never did a bullet hit him. His third horse, named "Lucky," became his companion for the rest of his days and was ridden by Grant into the thick of battle for the duration of the Civil War. Battered and broken, at nine o'clock in the evening Longstreet conceded defeat and ordered a full retreat back south, with Ulysses S. Grant in hot pursuit.

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    General Grant surveys the battlefield after victory in the Battle of Columbus

    Robert E. Lee had been holding in Elizabeth City since July 30, sending out scouting missions in the meantime, but receiving the news of the Union victory at the Battle of Columbus inspired him to once again take the offensive. He directed General Sherman's Army of the Hudson to head west for Gatesville, and then proceeded to lead the Army of the Potomac south, Edenton in his sights. It was on this push into North Carolina that the Confederacy started to already show its foundational cracks. North Carolina had been somewhat reluctant to secede from the Union in the first place, and the arrival of Bobby Lee made those tensions flare. Upon entering Hertford, on the road to Edenton, the Union Army was bid a warm welcome, and their numbers grew by two hundred. Similarly, neo-plantations in the area employing sharecropping collapsed into anarchy as soon as Old Glory appeared on the horizon. Half of the famous Liberty Brigade, formed in December 1861, consisted of rebellious African-Americans from North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, and Missouri, the other half being Northern whites and blacks alike.

    Edenton had been placed in charge of the newly-christened Brigadier General Nathan Bedford Forrest, who had risen to prominence after his role in the Battle of Dayton and was rushed east. The Battle of Edenton was truly one for the history books, and was dominated by the calvary. Forrest was exemplary in his equine skills, having attained the nickname of "the Wizard of the Saddle." Unfortunately for him, he was going up against J. E. B. Stuart, widely known as "the Black Knight" (a nickname with two backstories: firstly, he was considered to be the best calvary commander in American history, hence the "Knight"; secondly, the "Black" part of "Black Knight" was originally an insult given to him by racist southern Virginians when he attended college--Stuart was known for being quite progressive for the time). The following battle was notable in the fact that the Confederates were all found in new gray uniforms and holding shiny new British Enfield rifles, as opposed to Union Springfields and Tredegars. While the first British soldiers wouldn't see action in America until 1862, supplies were sneaking through the Hydra blockade. One such acquisition from the English was the new churka, invented in 1853 in British India and having been kept a secret from the world by the British East India Company. The churka was also known as the "cotton engine," and made the process of picking cotton lightning-fast. Many states of the Deep South, like South Carolina and Georgia, immediately began to use the invention on their neo-plantations. In a show of good faith, Queen Victoria had allowed for the churka design to be given to the Confederacy. Despite the better gear, Lee and Stuart's skill and the superior numbers of the Union forced Forrest out of Edenton on September 28.

    [​IMG]
    Major General J. E. B. "Jeb" Stuart

    [​IMG]
    Brigadier General Nathan Bedford Forrest

    The war in the East would stagnate until the new year, but out West, things began going unimaginably well. Major General George Meade had finally been given the go-ahead to invade Missouri, which had been fighting its own mini-civil war since it seceded. On September 14, Meade entered Saint Louis--a Union stronghold and major railway hub--unopposed. Similarly, Union troops across the state waltzed into Kansas City without a shot being fired. Meade plowed through northern Missouri, usually without much resistance. When his men reached Florida, Missouri, on October 2, he was greeted by a young man named Samuel Clemens waving the Stars and Stripes in company of the entire two-hundred-person strong population of the town. Meade immediately recognized Clemens' writing prowess, and, after heckling for a bit to get him to be his personal secretary, agreed to allow him to fight under his command. On November 16, 1861, after setting up a provisional state government, the Union officially welcomed Missouri--what had been the rebellious parts of northern Missouri and Saint Louis--as its newest state. As punishment for seceding, what had remained of the original Missouri, now south of its namesake river, was renamed "Ozark."

    The war wasn't cooling down any time soon. It was heating up. The United States had the fight of its life on its hands. Come 1862, things would only get worse… but, in some ways, better. The weight of the world was on President Lincoln's shoulders, a modern Atlas laboring under the pressures of the North and South.
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2019
  17. Unknown Member

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    To Britain and France, did you really think the U.S. wouldn't find out about what you were up to?

    Good update; I ain't envying Lincoln right now, and congrats at reaching 50k words, BTW...
     
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  18. farmerted555 Well-Known Member

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    24,000 dead in one day of combat? And the war's only just begun, too! May God help the South, because no one else will.
     
  19. HeX Self-Proclaimed Disney Expert

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    Don't worry--the Battle of Columbus was TTL's version of the Battle of Antietam. Granted (heh, a pun), this version was much sooner and had two thousand more casualties, but every battle won't be like this.

    But yeah, the South would really need Jesus in a chariot to come down and proclaim on the steps of the White House that the Confederacy must be given independence for the CSA to win this war.
     
  20. Ephraim Ben Raphael Super Writer Extraordinaire

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    A bit curious as to how the churka makes cotton grow faster.
     
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