Yeah, there's a reason the historiography of the First World War tends to focus on the political context instead of strategic picture. Or why up until recently there wasn't a mainstream game covering WWI.
 
Alright, folks, the "Old World" chapter I'm writing to close out 1918 is going to be considerably shorter than the last one I wrote about the Americas, and will focus more heavily on Europe and the Middle East than Africa and Asia. I'm just kind of burned out with the dullness of trench warfare and it's getting hard to come up with new ways to describe it and sound energized.

1919's gonna be fun, though. It's going to focus more on big events than on particular fronts.
I can't fault you, trench warfare doesn't really seize the imagination. I recently watched 1917 (excellent picture, well worth a watch) but even that was about derring-do behind enemy lines, the normal commanders seemed more bored than anything by the constant slog of that type of conflict.
 
I'm interested in the American popular consciousness postwar - political and social trends following Grand War. Unlike either of the OTL World Wars, Americans have had serious fighting on their northern and southern contiguous borders.
 

Cryostorm

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I'm interested in the American popular consciousness postwar - political and social trends following Grand War. Unlike either of the OTL World Wars, Americans have had serious fighting on their northern and southern contiguous borders.
Not to mention just getting out of a civil war.
 
I just started reading this, so I apologize if you've already gotten to this point (I don't want to risk spoilers by skipping ahead to check). In 1910, America allowed Japan to invade and annex Korea, despite having signed and ratified a treaty in 1882 promising to aid Korea if it were invaded, which paved the way for a brutal 35 year occupation and for Japan to use Korea as a base of operations from which to invade China in World War II.

I'm guessing that you're not going to want any of that.
 
I just started reading this, so I apologize if you've already gotten to this point (I don't want to risk spoilers by skipping ahead to check). In 1910, America allowed Japan to invade and annex Korea, despite having signed and ratified a treaty in 1882 promising to aid Korea if it were invaded, which paved the way for a brutal 35 year occupation and for Japan to use Korea as a base of operations from which to invade China in World War II.

I'm guessing that you're not going to want any of that.
While I appreciate the thought, the TL is currently in the tail end of the 1910s, so that won't be of much use.

Especially because of other, more substantial reasons (but I won't spoil what happens).
 
...Yes, and no. Anime/manga will be more restrained ITTL, more like Western animation than the zany, weird, off-the-wall monstrosity it is IOTL. This is for reasons I can't divulge yet because... spoilers.
Well, that throws a wrench in a crazy idea I had. I was thinking the ancestors of one Kohei Horikoshi emigrate to America before he's born, and his greatest work is made as western animation. That's right, My Hero Academia, only more diverse and it actually makes sense for All-Might to Delaware Smash things instead of Aomori Prefecture Smashing them.

EDIT: Came up with the idea on my own, then found out it was done in American Magic.
 
Flashes back to the "Heffalumps and Whoozles" sequence from Winnie the Pooh.

Huh? ...Oh, right, the grounded, totally not zany Western animation. :winkytongue:
 
Yeah calling western animation sane and rational isn't really telling the truth. Hell look at some of the old Disney and Warner Bros shorts and you tell me they were rational. It was only in the 50s during the cold war when they started to be more "normal". So really you could have a situation where Western animation can have out there stories like Anime as well. Just hopefully with less "it's ok because she's actually a 1000 year old demon" issues.
 
Yeah calling western animation sane and rational isn't really telling the truth. Hell look at some of the old Disney and Warner Bros shorts and you tell me they were rational. It was only in the 50s during the cold war when they started to be more "normal". So really you could have a situation where Western animation can have out there stories like Anime as well. Just hopefully with less "it's ok because she's actually a 1000 year old demon" issues.
I didn't say all Western animation was rational. But the majority of Western animation is just less strange than Anime. Cowboy Bebop does not belong in the same classification as Coco.
 
I didn't say all Western animation was rational. But the majority of Western animation is just less strange than Anime. Cowboy Bebop does not belong in the same classification as Coco.
I think the biggest problem with saying that anime is overall weirder than western animation is that we're looking at a culture from the outside, not just a different overall culture of another country with a far different history than our own, but also a different specific animation culture that has developed over decades. So while it overall looks weirder than Western animation to us that has more to do with being from a different cultural context that automatically makes it strange and odd to us from the outset. I honestly wouldn't be surprised if Japan considered Western media to be just as weird overall. Of course considering the global saturation of Western media it wouldn't be that surprising if they found our animation to be more familiar, and thus less strange, than the average westerner looking at anime.
 
Another thing to consider is how the Comic Scare effectively killed most of the comic genres in the US and simultaneously helped to create the modern superhero genre as we know it. Comics and cartoon were also considered inherently childish in the US, while in Japan they're enjoyed by people of all ages and you have manga and anime created for a wide diversity of demographics.

As well most manga, while obviously owned at least in part by the big publishers, starts with a single creator who has an idea and story and retains a good deal of creative control throughout the manga's run, and generally when a manga's run is done that is it, maybe some spinoffs if it's lucky but for the most part manga are fairly self contained. This is in contrast with how much of the US comics industry has worked for decades with properties being wholly owned by companies and written by many people over the years tweaked and rebooted at various times. In both obviously the companies have a good deal of input in the resulting comic/manga, but the historic model in the US lends itself to far more executive meddling and trying to sell it to the largest common denominator.

So with both of these taken into account I think that Japanese manga and anime have had a longer opportunity to be far more diverse and different, with a large field of works helping to encourage even more different and stranger works to help differentiate themselves from the rest of the pack and grab readers' attention. Which also, I think, helps to give the impression of overall anime weirdness.

An interesting thing to see in this timeline is, if there isn't a Comics Scare, how diverse and different the US comics industry ends up being.
 
Another thing to consider is how the Comic Scare effectively killed most of the comic genres in the US and simultaneously helped to create the modern superhero genre as we know it. Comics and cartoon were also considered inherently childish in the US, while in Japan they're enjoyed by people of all ages and you have manga and anime created for a wide diversity of demographics.

As well most manga, while obviously owned at least in part by the big publishers, starts with a single creator who has an idea and story and retains a good deal of creative control throughout the manga's run, and generally when a manga's run is done that is it, maybe some spinoffs if it's lucky but for the most part manga are fairly self contained. This is in contrast with how much of the US comics industry has worked for decades with properties being wholly owned by companies and written by many people over the years tweaked and rebooted at various times. In both obviously the companies have a good deal of input in the resulting comic/manga, but the historic model in the US lends itself to far more executive meddling and trying to sell it to the largest common denominator.

So with both of these taken into account I think that Japanese manga and anime have had a longer opportunity to be far more diverse and different, with a large field of works helping to encourage even more different and stranger works to help differentiate themselves from the rest of the pack and grab readers' attention. Which also, I think, helps to give the impression of overall anime weirdness.

An interesting thing to see in this timeline is, if there isn't a Comics Scare, how diverse and different the US comics industry ends up being.
Agreed! Although I will say, Golden Age comics (when they weren't about punching Hitler) and especially Silver Age comics were also fountains of the bizarre at times.
 
I didn't say all Western animation was rational. But the majority of Western animation is just less strange than Anime. Cowboy Bebop does not belong in the same classification as Coco.
I'm sorry but Cowboy Bepob is not just a magnificent show not just as an anime but in general it is also something that a western studio in all likely hood would've been willing to greenlight. A better comparison would've been something like Fooly Cooly VS Coco.
 
I'm sorry but Cowboy Bepob is not just a magnificent show not just as an anime but in general it is also something that a western studio in all likely hood would've been willing to greenlight. A better comparison would've been something like Fooly Cooly VS Coco.
I agree. Cowboy Bebob is one of the few anime that looks and feels like it could have been made by Americans or at least the West. Now that I think about it I could see the Scifi-Western/Space Cowboy genre become much bigger ITTL. Maybe a successful Firefly series that doesn't get axed in the middle of the first season by a bunch of idiotic, short-sighted corporate execs? No I'm not bitter about what happened to Firefly.
 
I agree. Cowboy Bebob is one of the few anime that looks and feels like it could have been made by Americans or at least the West. Now that I think about it I could see the Scifi-Western/Space Cowboy genre become much bigger ITTL. Maybe a successful Firefly series that doesn't get axed in the middle of the first season by a bunch of idiotic, short-sighted corporate execs? No I'm not bitter about what happened to Firefly.
Speaking of Sci-Fi will Star Wars still happen? Also unpopular opinion but Firefly wasn't that great. I get slow burns and all but it was 90% slow burn, 8%, exposition, and 1% actual action. Funny enough Serenity I actually enjoyed though.
 
Speaking of Sci-Fi will Star Wars still happen? Also unpopular opinion but Firefly wasn't that great. I get slow burns and all but it was 90% slow burn, 8%, exposition, and 1% actual action. Funny enough Serenity I actually enjoyed though.
I get people not liking slow burns since sometimes I don't like them. I think the most frustrating thing about Firefly is it seemed to be building up to something great but wasn't given a chance to get there. Serenity was good but I wanted more of the show rather than a quick movie to make fans shut up. Worst shows getting a second season or at least the decency to finish their only season just adds salt to the wound and spit in the eyes to us Firefly fans. But who knows it could have ended up like Lost or Game of Thrones with terrible endings.

As for Star Wars... the Empire is going to be even more British and with America's history ITTL their might be less Star Wars fans who support the Empire with the Rebels possibly being the fan favorite instead.
 
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I get people not liking slow burns since sometimes I don't like them. I think the most frustrating thing about Firefly is it seemed to be building up to something great but wasn't given a chance to get there. Serenity was good but I wanted more of the show rather than a quick movie to make fans shut up. Worst shows getting a second season or at least the decency to finish their only season just adds salt to the wound and spit in the eyes to us Firefly fans. But who knows it could have ended up like Lost or Game of Thrones with terrible endings.

As for Star Wars... the Empire is going to be even more British and with America's history ITTL their might be less Star Wars fans who support the Empire with the Rebels possibly being the fan favorite instead.
If the Stormtrooper helmets are designed to look like British helmets they’re going to look rediculous
 
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