A More Perfect Union: An Alternate History of the Land of the Free

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: Before 1900' started by HeX, May 22, 2019.

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  1. Ironshark Well-Known Member

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    I mean the Chinese are also implied to be censoring American media with the “bamboo wall “ thing
    So it’s not as simple as “our revolutionary spirt better”

    My guess
    is One nation becomes more realist and the other more idealistic


    Either China becomes cynical and began speaking pulling shady shit for the greater good which causes conflict with idealistic America or China become more idealistic in a “ the world is destined to be united as a family ...even If takes force “ way while America still believes in compromise

    I hope China snd the USA fix there relationship better then Russia and the US did OTL


    Now I wonder what the “big bad international problem “ will be AFTER the phantom war ...the 2000s need there own struggle after al

    My guess The Middle East or maybe even South America fueled by some type of extreme anti globalization nationalism
     
  2. Simeon La empresa crecerá más grande

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    I honestly see Germany being the leader of “third way” ITTL, ironically made up of socialist states, watching nervously as the two states with the most Revolutionary Spirit duke it out with each other.

    C’mon, Revolutionary Spirit states can have much worse colours, and the most plausible state having such is Germany. While democratic, it is still a very aristocratic state that had an economic system not too different with the United States, with a hated newly-rich industrialists not too implausible.

    The succesful revolution can be far more democratic and pro-American, for one.
     
  3. HeX Self-Proclaimed Disney Expert

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    Do they really? Or is that just our own OTL bias talking?
     
  4. Ironshark Well-Known Member

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    Well I mean even if everything is not violently at war there’s has to be a political issue at least for things to stay interesting

    No one..well actually I would enjoy a timeline of just state visits and queens meeting popes and Presidents hugging religious leaders and political campaigns. just the world coming up with good ideas and International Teamwork with descriptions of all the bureaucracy and paperwork .

    But I doubt most people would enjoy that
     
  5. HeX Self-Proclaimed Disney Expert

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    Hey, all I'm gonna say is that this timeline has been mostly nonstop war for the US, from the three Anglo-American Wars to the two Civil Wars to the countless interventions on the behalf of Revolutionary Spirit. So if people are bored if things shift gears from war to bureaucratic disagreements by then... well, it sucks for them.
     
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  6. Ironshark Well-Known Member

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    I’ll enjoy it either way!

    Umm I know this might be spoiling but are cool constitutionalist monarchies still going to be a thing?

    Like China and Germany currently still have theirs but will other countries keep theres?
     
  7. Goldwind2 Well-Known Member

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    Will
    I belive sicly is consisal moncahry
     
  8. Simeon La empresa crecerá más grande

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    Extreme Catholic/Christian reaction on the 40’s sexual revolution.
    *laughs in butthurt nationalism and stupid corruption*

    The past two decades asked that question. The answer is, we’d have shady deals that just haunts us back, like the Islamists in Afghanistan (which the US used to support as the valiant resistance against USSR) and Putin’s ascendance (arising from Russia’s disillusionment from the post-Soviet corruption). The 90’s came to believe what you’ve said, that it’s the the end of history, up until the eleventh of September of 2001, and even then it took Russia invading Ukraine and starting to flood the internet with memes to knocking us out of that pipe dream.

    If all the issues we’ve experienced are supposedly resolved in the 60’s, then they’ll simply move on to others. The question is whether we are able to envision that issue from their standpoints, so as to make sense of it.
     
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  9. generalurist Map Staring Expert

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    Not so much the 2000s specifically, as much as it is "there needs to be something to cause tension once the cold war ends". Bit ridiculous for it to be the "end of history", unless you're going for a traditional "everyone lived happily ever after "ending.

    Your right. Jeez, TTL's USA has been at war much more than OTL huh? Actually, I'm curious what impact if any this constant warfare has had on the American psyche. In general aside from the big ones like the Slaver's Revolt it seems to get over them rather quick.
     
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  10. HeX Self-Proclaimed Disney Expert

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    I did say I was aiming for as close to a utopia as one can realistically get. So while there won't be an end to conflict in general, I do think that post-Phantom War we'll see only the limited conflicts that characterized the 1990s IOTL, nothing like the War on Terror or anything that large of a scale.
     
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  11. Simeon La empresa crecerá más grande

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    Well, if anything, the next big conflict will be set to be after 2025, then, upon which the people, supposedly living in many decades of genuine peace, tolerance, and prosperity, will really be in an unpleasant surprise even if it will not be a world war.

    What can we call that era? Harmonious 20’s?
     
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  12. Goldwind2 Well-Known Member

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    I hope your vison of near utopia includes advanced progress in green technology
     
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  13. MrVulcan Autistic Worldbuilder

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    That reminds me. What will become of a certain Representative Milk?
     
  14. Ironshark Well-Known Member

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    He ceremonially officiates the first legal gay marriage?
    .Or maybe he’s the person to get married after it’s legalized ..well the first public figure
    That would be pretty emotional.
     
  15. Threadmarks: The Greatest Generation, Part Eight: The Government is Us

    HeX Self-Proclaimed Disney Expert

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    [​IMG]

    With the Falcon Uprising now in the past, the United States of America found itself in a remarkably similar situation to what it had faced fifty years earlier, when the Confederacy was squashed and the South was forcibly rejoined to the North and West. The Federalists controlled both houses of Congress by large margins and in the White House sat Theodore Roosevelt, the most Hamiltonian of the party. That meant an opportunity for great change presented itself, change that would bring the nation back together as its wounds healed from an arduous civil war. The remnants of the Gilded Age needed to be scraped aside, which President Roosevelt was dead-set on doing with the Square Deal.

    The Uprising had only been a chapter of the Great Depression. American employment rates were still rock-bottom, especially as the Army regurgitated all the conscripted G.I.s they no longer needed, and the legislation bouncing around in Washington seemed to be the only thing capable of saving the devastated economy. The Square Deal was a collection of proposed bills and a few constitutional amendments that focused on the "three Rs": relief for the unemployed and poor, recovery of the economy back to normal levels and reform of the financial system to prevent another future depression. Only one such bill had been made law during wartime, the Emergency Banking Act of 1912, allowed the thirteen Federal Reserve Banks to issue additional currency on good assets so that banks that reopened following the national holiday put in place by the president would be able to meet every legitimate call. The civil war had stalled out all other attempts to remedy the situation, with Square Deal legislation on hold until 1915. All was not lost, however, given that war called for weapons, and with factories few and far between in the Union, new ones had to be constructed and needed workers inside. Cities like Richmond, Nashville, San Francisco, and Philadelphia became industrial hotspots, as men and women flooded into town hoping to snag a job before they were all gone. Seeing this, Speaker Winston Churchill noted the industriousness of the American people, and, in 1915, rallied the cry for the creation of the Civilian Conservation Corps, which was a voluntary public work relief program for unemployed, unmarried people aged 17-27. The CCC was founded specifically for the government to kill two birds with one stone, themselves getting labor needed to build public works while also providing a source of income for thousands of young Americans.

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    Recruitment poster for the CCC, ca. 1916

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    Men and women of the CCC labor in the construction of public works during the Depression, 1917

    Another landmark piece of the Square Deal was the National Recovery Agency (NRA), created by the National Economic Recovery Act (NERA) in late 1915. Perhaps the most controversial part of the early Square Deal, the NRA had the goal of eliminating unfair and "un-American" competition and bringing together industry, labor, and government to craft codes of fair practice and set prices. Though admission was voluntary, companies and stores that didn't display the Blue Eagle (the symbol of the NRA) on their products or in their windows were often boycotted. Samuel Gompers was appointed as head of the organization, and he set out to take the first steps towards a planned economy in the United States. A national minimum wage was enforced by the NRA, between 25 and 45 cents an hour, as was a maximum workweek of 35 to 45 hours. The power of unions swelled thanks to the NRA, proving that the US didn't need a Socialist in office to enact labor-leaning policies. For the first time in forever, the economy seemed to be looking up.

    [​IMG]

    But Teddy Roosevelt wanted the Square Deal to be concrete. Future generations might see a surge in what he considered "bad economics," the practices of the Gilded Age that got the world to this point, on the precipice of ruin, and nothing was harder to change than the Constitution. During the Great Depression, three amendments were proposed, fought for, and ratified, proving to be the lasting legacy of the Bull Moose and his push for progressivism.


    Amendment No. 22
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    Section 1. The Twentieth Amendment is repealed; it is a federal offense to transport or import tobacco products into US states and territories where such actions are prohibited by the laws of those "clean" states and territories.


    Amendment No. 23
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    Section 1. The Congress shall have power to limit, regulate, and prohibit the labor of persons under eighteen years of age.

    Section 2. The power of the several States is unimpaired by this article except that the operation of State laws shall be suspended to the extent necessary to give effect to legislation enacted by the Congress.


    Amendment No. 24
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    Section 1. Corporate meddling in American governmental affairs, including lobbying in excess and bribery, is strictly prohibited.

    Section 2. People entering public office or an executive corporate position, above a certain annual income, must wait five years at minimum to do so if their previous employment was at one of these positions.



    The shining star of the Square Deal was the Social Security Administration (SSA), created by the Social Security Act of 1916 and better known as the catalyst for Teddy Roosevelt's "Great Leap Forward" campaign. Social Security in its initial form was a safety net for the elderly, who faced poverty in their old age in remarkably disproportionate relation to the rest of American society, and was funded by payroll taxes. Given the Great Depression's affect on all of the United States, though, provisions were added to the law to hand out unemployment benefits to needy people, the first legislation of this kind in the world. Social Security would long outlive the 1910s and see major reforms and amendments added in the future, but this was a good start, bringing the nation in line with other welfare states like Germany and Greece.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    President Roosevelt signs the Social Security Act into law, 1916

    A major tenant of the post-Falcon Uprising era was the situation to be had in the regions that had rebelled. With Eugene V. Debs dead, most Socialists had abandoned Falconism and decided to stand with Gompers and the reorganized Labor Party (formerly the SPA), leaving Upton Sinclair--de facto Falconer leader--without an audience. On December 2, 1915, Sinclair and the rest of the remaining members of the Council of the Five Falcons were sentenced to life in prison. This was the beginning of the Recovery, the five-year span that the states of Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, Superior, Texas, and Pecos were occupied by the US military for varying amounts of time (Ohio was under military rule for only one year, while Illinois was occupied for the full term). While similar to Redemption, Recovery was less about re-education and more about rehabilitation, purging the rebellious states of Falconic iconography and ideals but not of the ideology of socialism itself and welcoming them back into the Union. Things were progressing without issue until the mysterious death of Upton Sinclair. One of the first conspiracy theories to capture the American public, Sinclair was discovered dead in his cell in Cook County Penitentiary in Chicago, a silver pistol near his corpse and a bullet through his forehead. The case went officially unsolved and was plagued by countless mishaps, but the general public consensus was that the Socialist leader had been murdered by a guard and set up the scene to appear like a suicide. Whatever the reason, Sinclair's demise stalled the Recovery, leaving the United States of America in a serious predicament. The economy, despite all the Square Deal had done, was still faltering, and unemployment was astoundingly high. The arms industry was confused, in a limbo between the old heartland of America and the new industrial hotspots scattered across the republic. The people were growing demoralized coming off the high of victory that followed every war. Still, Teddy Roosevelt was not one to get depressed, even if the world was, as he steered the Union back into the crossfire of global politics. And they would start with one simple question directed at the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland:

    What the hell are you doing in Québec?​
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2019 at 12:55 AM
  16. HeX Self-Proclaimed Disney Expert

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    There is one more post left before the Grand War begins. One more post before the United States of America must give all it has to repel the forces of evil and spread the fire of Revolutionary Spirit to all, or die trying.

    Are you excited? Because I sure am.

    (BTW, sorry if the Square Deal feels a bit too similar to another Roosevelt's deal. It's just... all the good names and ideas were floating around in FDR's Alphabet Soup, and there weren't many ways I could go around it.)
     
  17. farmerted555 Well-Known Member

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    TR's Great Leap Forward? I assume this might lead to Churchill's Cultural Revolution.
     
  18. Ironshark Well-Known Member

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    God damn it UK
    I assume there ruling there overseas territories(including Quebec ) with an really tight iron fist

    great chapter!

    I loved seeing teddy doing what his cousin did a few decades ahead of time
     
  19. MrVulcan Autistic Worldbuilder

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    When can we expect this post?
     
  20. HeX Self-Proclaimed Disney Expert

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    Sometime this week, probably towards the end of it.
     
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