A More Imperfect Union: A History of these United States

I've got a theory here. One that I'm pretty sure you won't spill the beans on yet if it's true, but I'll say it regardless.

Given this is referred to as the Second full-on American Civil War and we haven't heard from the Confederation yet, I don't think they'll secede. I think Northern states will try and join the Confederation, who's attitude on the states would allow them to do what they please regarding slavery.
Except there is a wikibox further up the thread which suggests that the Confederation is also going to split.

 
Except there is a wikibox further up the thread which suggests that the Confederation is also going to split.

That could potentially throw a wrench in that idea, though I think there's still potential for it. Like, if the Confederation were to go through a huge change at the end up of the civil war (such as absorbing its other half) it could be considered an entirely new government/nation altogether. It wouldn't be too odd for historians to distinguish their entrance into the civil war as where the first confederation ends and whatever takes its place begins.
 
I've got a theory here. One that I'm pretty sure you won't spill the beans on yet if it's true, but I'll say it regardless.

Given this is referred to as the Second full-on American Civil War and we haven't heard from the Confederation yet, I don't think they'll secede. I think Northern states will try and join the Confederation, who's attitude on the states would allow them to do what they please regarding slavery.
Well if the Northern states leave the Trenton Republic and join the Confederation, they are still secede though And its not like the Republic would just let them go :p

Not quite unfortunately! But you aren't wrong that the Confederation will get involved, its just not going to be in this way. The fact of the matter is that the Confederation is basically a economic backwater with a weak central government that bows to the whims of Ohio and the Republic. Because its also divided plus with a lack of sea access, it lacks power within its own borders much less outside it.

I haven't had the time to cover the Confederation, but would you like to see an update of some sort?

That could potentially throw a wrench in that idea, though I think there's still potential for it. Like, if the Confederation were to go through a huge change at the end up of the civil war (such as absorbing its other half) it could be considered an entirely new government/nation altogether. It wouldn't be too odd for historians to distinguish their entrance into the civil war as where the first confederation ends and whatever takes its place begins.
I like your thinking because I thought the same way before! But you have to remember that while slavery divides America now, there is still the old Federalist/Confederalist divide and all the cultural/political/economic divisions that it created (like having two totally incompatible railroads).
 
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Sojourner's Church
Sojourner's Church, also known as the First Liberationist Church, was a Protestant Christian denomination prominent in the eastern United States during the 19th century. It was most famously known for its radical opposition to slavery. The denomination grew out of the participation of the New England churches in the anti-slavery movement. Among its founders was Richard W. Beecher, a preacher and abolitionist, whose pen name was used to name the church.

Much of the theology of Sojourner's Church corresponded to common Protestant Christian teachings, such as the Trinity and the infallibility of Scripture. Distinctive teachings include the inner Light of God and the doctrine of societal judgement. Influenced by Quaker belief of Christ's light shining inside each person, it formed the basis of their anti-slavery views and abolitionist activities. Furthermore, they held that if they were able, God judged each person for their contribution to fixing societal ills and blessed the ones that did.

The church was also known for its significant involvement in politics, philanthropic work, and its advocacy of conservative principles and lifestyle. By the 1860s, their believers had significant influence over the Northern Clique and the majority of state governments, except New York, which was economically tied to to the Greater South. Local congregations were heavily involved with charity work and other philanthropic causes in their town which helped garner support and new members.

Originally beginning as a single church in New Haven, Connecticut in 1833, it grew rapidly throughout the 1840s as slavery became a national issue. It would become the leading force behind the American anti-slavery movement, helping to found and support the Brotherhood which assisted fugitive slaves escape to the Canadas. At first a proponent of nonviolent action, suppression by the Republican government led to its radicalization and a rapid increase in new members. By the outbreak of the Second Civil War, it is estimated that up to 12% of the population in the Greater North were members.
 
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Sorry for the delay with this update, my university has started and this update has turned into a real slog. Still I hope to continue this project :), but I would rather use a different format next time.
 
My only regret is that I have but one like to give for each post of this timeline!
Thank you very much!

Also I would like you people to know that I plan to make some changes to this timeline. II am planning to diverging from the purely chronological writing style that I am doing at the moment. I largely done this chronologically so the canon can organically evolve as I wrote it. However as I reaching to late 19th century, I am starting to have a good idea on how the modern-day would look like. So after I finish the 2nd Civil War, I will start posting glimspes of the (many) modern United States.

Starting with a map of North America (Nortamerica) .
 
due to this timeline and it's, well unorthodox to say the least, writing system, I can't tell if that was a typo or intentional
Nah its intentional! I probably should have mentioned it before, but very important rule here! All the wikiboxes and other stuff made in the wikipedia style are made from an out of universe perspective and thus in normal english.

The fasces was a prominent symbol of the French Revolution OTL, and the TTL's First French Republic would use it prominently as its national symbol. The fasces would be symbol of French-style revolutionary liberalism and also liberalism in general. Here Faiscism is more or less early liberalism which is something much more revolutionary/oligarchical than the liberalism that we are familiar with.
 
Nah its intentional! I probably should have mentioned it before, but very important rule here! All the wikiboxes and other stuff made in the wikipedia style are made from an out of universe perspective and thus in normal english.

The fasces was a prominent symbol of the French Revolution OTL, and the TTL's First French Republic would use it prominently as its national symbol. The fasces would be symbol of French-style revolutionary liberalism and also liberalism in general. Here Faiscism is more or less early liberalism which is something much more revolutionary/oligarchical than the liberalism that we are familiar with.
ah, so it isn't as bad as fascism. phew. i would like to see how europe's doing ittl.
 
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