A More Imperfect Union: A History of these United States

Awasome map but I have a few questions
1) why is there 2 south carolinas
2) how did frankfort become the capital of virginia
3) what is the capital of pennsylvania and georgia
Okay Frankfort is a bit special because its a secondary capital city.

So when there is only the national capitol in a state, it means that state shares its capitol with the national capitol. This ends up happening because the state with the national capitol ends up becoming the central power for the country, so for Georgia it has its state and national capitol in Savannah. So in this case of Virginia, its capital is still in Richmond but due to its size, it has a second capitol city out in the west.

However for Pennsylvania that is a mistake, so thank you for pointing that out.
 
Columbus? Id think that Toledo would work? If Ohio gets more immigrants from Canada than from the States, maybe Toledo might be able to eclipse Detroit?
Oh yeah Columbus my mistake lol.

Yeah its possible, there would be a lot of migration between Ohio and Canada as a matter of fact. That is certianly an interesting idea however.
 
The demographics of this canada are looking to be significantly more french, interested to see where this heads
Yep! I am actually planning something interesting for Canada. It will be a truly bilingual state instead of all the French speakers concentrated in one province. With the Anglo-Canadian settlers and the Quebecker working together to overthrow the old colonial authority, the two people are beginning to share a common identity. This would only grow as Ohio continues to grow its economic influence in Canada.
 
Why is Springfield, Illinois (Columbia ITTL) located in a different spot than OTL?
Well its founding was butterflied away since the beginnings of the city began in 1818. Besides the economy and trading connections are different as well, so the name was used but its for a different city.
 
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I'm curious: Did the forces of the Second American Civil War have their own flags? What about the nations formed after the war?
 
Annapolis appears twice, @Planita13
Fixed!
I'm curious: Did the forces of the Second American Civil War have their own flags? What about the nations formed after the war?
It was less flags and more usage of symbols; you can see the symbols that they used on the Civil War wikipedia page. The North used the Liberty cap from the French Revolution and the Southerners used the cockade. There were battle flags but they were basically plain red flags for the North and black/white flags for the south.

I'll cover the post war states in the next update so stay tuned!

Also I literally just noticed, Lake Columbia. Any reason for the change @Planita13 ?
Well Ohio was in a Americana phase as the North and South grew divided.It wasn't really a government made decision but it was an independent(ish) government sponsored cartographic society which had its own ideas about how its name should be. They also renamed rivers and other lakes as well. Not all the names stuck of course, but Lake Columbia's name did when they got a goverment commission for settlers in the region to use the name.
 
Also, how did the confederation enter the civil war? And what was the Confederation Convention?
The confederation entered the civil war in bits and pieces. The northern states began to back the abolitionists one by one and the southern states soon followed by backing the slavers. Obviously this made the members of the Confederation enemies against each other. The Confederation Convention was basically a last ditch attempt to heal the divide in the Confederation, by basically trying to have them be neutral in the civil war. Obviously it didn't work.
 
Yep! I am actually planning something interesting for Canada. It will be a truly bilingual state instead of all the French speakers concentrated in one province. With the Anglo-Canadian settlers and the Quebecker working together to overthrow the old colonial authority, the two people are beginning to share a common identity. This would only grow as Ohio continues to grow its economic influence in Canada.
Bit late getting back to this but im real pumped: )
 
American Internal Border

The beginnings of the American Internal Border, or simply The Border, were laid even before the war officially ended. The ceasefire declared on May 11th 1870 all but solidified the battlelines that scarred the landscape. In the waning days of the Civil War, the states themselves were divided between the forces of the North and the forces of the South. Nowhere the division was more stark, than in Pennsylvania. Occupied for the majority of the war and ravaged by devastating battles at its largest cities, the state was split in two. In occupied Pennsylvania, rebel activity was met with harsh reprisals; anyone suspected of supporting them were driven from their homes. Most returned after rebel forces retook most of the state, but in the territory that the Republic continued to control, their leave turned out to be permanent.

The ceasefire was declared after an arduous stalemate through the work of the Ohio Foreign Department. Few thought that the current map would last for long at first, until the two sides attempted to negotiate an armistice agreement. For nearly two months, delegations from the north and south haggled in Harrisonburg, over nearly all parts of the agreement, especially over the exchange of prisoners of war. It was only until the timely threat of Ohio intervention that the South would agree to the terms. From then on, few would believe that a formal peace treaty would ever be signed. And they would be right.

The Harrisonburg Armistice never explicitly established a demilitarized zone along the border. Instead it was an unintended consequence of a stalemate frozen in mid battle. Even before the ceasefire was declared, the frontline was stagnant for months as both sides. Basic earthworks were more than enough to repel the attacks of disorganized militia forces. When the ceasefire was declared in May, both sides took the opportunity to upgrade their defences in case. The uneasy ceasefire would largely remain untested until it was clear that a comprehensive peace treaty would never be signed. Then things really got tense.

In the months that followed, border incidents occurred almost weekly. Troops stationed at their significantly improved fortifications, would often open fire with muskets and the occasional cannon over any perceived provocation. While neither side trusted each other and fully expected a war at some point in the future, no one wanted another war at that moment. Tensions would slowly deescalate over time as professional trained troops with significantly better trigger discipline replaced the ragtag militias that had manned the trenches. Meanwhile their hastily constructed basic trenches were expanded upon and eventually replaced with larger wallsand elevated gun platforms, just out of range of enemy guns.

By the end of 1871, the North-South border was firmly established as the most militarized border on the entire continent. Along the entire stretch of the North-South border from the Ohio River in the west to Delaware Bay in the east, thousands of soldiers manned a complex system of walls, forts, artillery positions, and trenches facing their counterparts across the border. While the majority of the fortifications consisted of small walls and trenches, dozens of major forts were constructed along the border especially in the east. Between the lines was an effective no man's land, forbidden to large troop formations by agreement. The majority of the troops would remain in the hinterlands behind their border at military bases, ready to rush to the border to repel an invasion at a moment’s notice. As a peace deal was never signed, the war never truly ended and the troops that manned both fortifications were technically still in a state of war. However only major border skirmishes would occur; the majority resulting from escaping slaves crossing the Internal Border. Large-scale warfare would only resume with the beginning of the Great Crusade nearly 40 years later.
 
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