A Destiny Realized: A Timeline of Afsharid Iran and Beyond

Speaking about North America is Tecumseh/Tenkswatawa or someone equivalent still arise and try to create something like otl Tecumseh's Confederacy?
 
No doubt, this difference in TTL's French revolution and of OTLs' counterpart will impact on Europe and the world won't probably be the one we're familiar with.

It's quite a pity this TL Napoleon won't get his time to shine.
 
I wonder what this timeline's version of WW1. With countries like China and some African countries likely being Europe-level powers, things will be epic.
It's certainly going to be a far more complex picture in terms of international relations. Rather than "progressive" European nations vs the rest of the world, we are likely to see the more administratively sophisticated states in various regions become dominant, and while in some areas this may mean colonial states, this will likely be the case for fewer regions than in OTL.
If there is going to be any comparisons to the OTL cold war, that would be emphasis on investments in technology and science for the arms race. Which has got me excited for earlier discoveries and implementations of them in regular life.^^
Especially if other parts of the world such as India remain as technological innovators in the military sphere, some technologies may well appear faster than their real-life counterparts, especially if other countries end up adopting European scientific methods. I mean picture a naval race where you've got about 10 powers around the world competing.
Did the US get OTL Northwest territories, and did Louisiana go to the Brits? Or did all of New France become a Kingdom?
The seizures of territory have been limited, and they've mainly been confined to the East Coast and the Appalachians. At the moment, Louisiana is still fairly unpopulated, with a small white population outside a 50 mile radius of New Orleans. The distance of this population centre from that in Canada proper may lead to problems in the future, but for the time being the sprawling kingdom serves as a suitable "home away from home" for some of the French Bourbons.
Along with the map, can you do a list of countries with the highest population on top and then have the list go down? Thanks.
I've been working on a statistical update which will come a little bit later than the map.
Sooo... long live French Canada?

Wait. *ahem*

VIVE CANADA FRANÇAIS.
The only thing that I can say for sure is that TTL's equivalent to McDonalds will serve poutine as opposed to the regular fries we have in our own world. This could make the timeline either a dystopia or utopia depending on your opinion on poutine.
Speaking about North America is Tecumseh/Tenkswatawa or someone equivalent still arise and try to create something like otl Tecumseh's Confederacy?
If the encroachment of white settlers becomes too severe (which is definitely on its way), this is certainly a possibility. However, with a divide of power on the North American continent, the natives have greater room to play the Europeans against each other than in OTL.
EXACTLY!!

Just hope the Just For Laugh's Comedy Festival survives
It's a possibility, if butterflies don't turn Quebec/New France into some kind of theocratic nightmare state on par with OTL's Saudi Arabia...
No doubt, this difference in TTL's French revolution and of OTLs' counterpart will impact on Europe and the world won't probably be the one we're familiar with.

It's quite a pity this TL Napoleon won't get his time to shine.
Certainly by the end of OTL's 19th century there will be an enormous difference to our own world. Not only ideologically, but a more warlike European continent will have effects on Europe's political and economic development, as well as that of the world outside of Europe.
 
The Conservative Powers Strike Back - Europe Part Three, 1823 to 1831
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The Conservative Powers Strike Back

The end of the Second French Revolutionary War left little settled. Europe was divided between the traditional powers, increasingly wary of any kind of political innovation and the Revolutionaries, who following their victory were increasingly confident that in the future, they could spread their ideology across Europe. Both saw a coming conflict, in which those who were opposed to the revolution would have to fight to keep it from swallowing up their own countries. There were some, however, who saw the coming conflict as an opportunity rather than a threat.


The Duke of Brandenburg, Friedrich Wilhelm, a young and ambitious king who idolised his ancestor Frederick the Great and who wanted to emulate his military and political successes, saw the rift in Europe as a great chance for his state to restore its former rank. For several decades in the previous century, Brandenburg had been the Kingdom of Prussia, one of the great powers on the European Continent, and had even been a match for Austria. The disastrous Seven Years War saw the partition of Prussia and a seeming end to the ambitions of the Hohenzollern Dynasty [1]. Friedrich Wilhelm was not the kind of leader who would let vastly diminished resources stand in the way of his own glory however, and began constructing a web of alliances that publically were supposed to halt the tide of revolution. While he was keen to boost Brandenburg’s profile as one of Europe’s middle powers, in actual fact his ambition was to increase the size of his own state and if possible, to restore the Kingdom of Prussia.


Great Britain, the traditional financiers of whichever continental power was happy to take up arms against France, were the natural first partner. Chartist uprisings in the industrial cities of Manchester and Leeds had frightened the aristocracy of the United Kingdom, which now thought that the containment of Revolution in Europe during the peacetime was a matter of national security. Friedrich Wilhelm negotiated a subsidy to build up his own forces, purportedly to stand against potential unrest in his own country as well as outside it. To the Austrians and Russians, increasingly conservative and wary that the radicalism of Western Europe could easily spread to Central and Eastern Europe, he offered a pact against any attempted Revolution within Eastern Europe, while secretly providing aid to radicals within Poland to shift the balance of power within the Polish Sejm. As it transpired, the Polish Liberals and Radical Liberals won a majority in the elections of 1825, announcing a series of centralising reforms and publically debating the possibility of turning Poland into a Republic. When word spread that the Poles had entered into negotiations for an alliance with France, it appeared as though the balance of power within Eastern Europe was to be fundamentally shifted.


This was just the opportunity that Friedrich Wilhelm had prepared for, and indeed an opportunity he had no small hand in creating. Only 3 months after the election of the Polish Revolutionaries, he had mobilized the Prussian army and invited both the Russian Tsar and the Austrian Emperor to join him in “Restoring Order” to Poland. France raised protests and threatened war if Poland’s sovereignty were to be violated, but this did not stop Brandenburger forces from crossing the border in the August of 1825. Within a few days, both Russia and Austria had also invaded, and France had declared war on all three powers. However, the only combatant that had entered the war with a solid plan was Brandenburg, whose aim was more to seize the old territories of East Prussia than to force political change on the Poles. He had gambled that both Austria and Russia would be more than happy to take care of the latter, which allowed him to begin turning his forces to the west once his territorial ambitions had been achieved.


While the forces of the three conservative powers fought against determined Polish resistance, which checked their armies on a number of occasions, the French response was plodding and unsure. The Radicals wanted to boldly strike east, abolishing the “decrepit feudal relic” of the Holy Roman Empire and save Poland from her almost certain doom. However, the majority of members of the National Assembly were unsure that France could sustain an offensive war, exhausted as she was after the recent Revolutionary War. French generals advised that any offensive action so far from home would be a difficult proposition logistically. Ultimately it took a total of 58 days for French forces begin moving into the Holy Roman Empire, by which point the military situation of the Poles had deteriorated and the Austrians and Brandenburgers had begun moving west to counter the expected French offensives. Their forces were unable to stop the French from crossing the Rhine however, and the Austrians suffered a bruising defeat at Mosbach at the hands of Davout. Although able to fight the French to a standstill at the Battle of Alsfeld, the Brandenburgers were forced to pull back.


The French war in Germany was a brutal one. French soldiers lived off the land, often pillaging, raping and murdering German peasants, who swiftly developed a strong hatred for their occupiers. For all of the high-minded rhetoric of “war to the chateaus, peace to the cottages”, French soldiers often turned to the looting of peasant villages to find supplies [2]. Despite their early victories, the French were not strong enough to push into Eastern Germany, and states such as Saxony, Brandenburg and Austria were left untouched by French forces, as did the British dependency of Hannover. Reinforcements from Russia following the occupation of Poland further solidified the stalemate, leaving the situation increasingly grim for France. As the forces of the conservative alliance began to push back in 1827, the French eventually sued for peace. The seemingly irresistible force of Revolution had been halted, and a great deal of the credit for this went to both the Russians as well as the newly created King Friedrich Wilhelm of a restored Prussian Kingdom.


In France, the defeat caused the downfall of Nicholas Périer’s government, with his consulship terminated early by the national assembly. The national debate turned to whether aiding revolutions in other parts of Europe was a serious goal for the French state, or whether there was to be a higher emphasis on peace and the recovery of what was by this point, a nation that had been exhausted by almost constant warfare for almost ten years. When the elections of 1828 turned out a conservative majority for the first time in the history of the Second Republic, it appeared as though the nation had spoken. Although there was no question of a second restoration of the monarchy, programmes of secularisation were placed on hold for the time being, and there was limited restoration of property that had been taken from “enemies of the state”. A third French constitution was written in 1829 which aimed to promote stability by lengthening the terms of public office while replacing the Consul with a President who could be elected for one six year term. Although considered a betrayal of the revolution by radical thinkers, the conservative faction in the National Assembly had at least restored order to a nation which was near-broken.


By contrast, the victory of the Conservative Monarchies in the East had boosted their own profiles, as well as the confidence of their rulers. Although far from being a great power, Frederick Wilhelm had restored Prussia as a kingdom at the very least, and now eyed further opportunities for expansion in the future. In 1828, the Russians and Austrians formed a “Holy Alliance” aiming to protect the revived idea of Christendom not only from the Muslim powers of the south but from the advancing threat of anticlericalism from European revolutionaries. As the Austrian Emperor Karl put it “You see in me and the Russian Tsar, the qualities that have allowed Christendom to thrive in the last few centuries”. The irony that Austria had been one of the first large European powers to enact policies of secularisation was lost, as both Emperor and Tsar looked to the Church to ward off discontent amongst the peasantry in particular.


In Russia, an emphasis on religious identity was coupled with a growing tendency toward a Russian identity amongst the nobility of the country. In the 18th century, use of the French language and cultural norms was considered the mark of sophistication by Russia’s nobility, so much so that historians have indeed argued that they may have well have been a separate people altogether from the Russian peasantry. By 1830 a French traveller to Russia remarked that conversation at social events, which he had been previously able to follow without issue in previous visits, was now conducted in an “unintelligible, oriental tongue”. While this may have contributed to a growing sense of cultural distance from Western Europe, this also began to improve cohesion within Russia itself, a non-inconsiderable boon in the age where the idea of a modern nation-state was emerging [3]. Within parts of the Russian intelligentsia an association of Russia with the concept of “Slavdom” and “Orthodoxy” emerged, which contradicted the previous westernising trend that had enamoured Russia’s elite in the previous century.


[1] – At the very least, this timeline will see fewer kids on the internet who think that Prussians were indestructible neo-Spartans

[2] – This mirrors the revolutionary wars of OTL, when German peasants became accustomed to the French demands “Landsmann Wein! Landsmann Geld! Dépêches-toi, oder kaput!” no matter what the lofty rhetoric of the revolutionaries back in Paris was.

[3] – The Russian Nobility’s French speaking habit is perhaps best known from War and Peace in OTL and started to change only with Napoleon’s invasion. Naturally without such a traumatic event, the transition from French to Russian amongst the nobility is likely to be somewhat more protracted.

* * * * * *

Author's Notes - As it transpires, the revolution is not invincible. Poland, stuck between the three conservative powers, seems doomed to an unhappy 19th century, and France seems to be facing a Europe united in opposition beyond the Rhine. This will likely deepen the sense of a "Cold War" in Europe, but ultimately the balance of power is with the conservative powers. Russia's turn toward Conservatism isn't likely to produce the same reactionary rule that was seen in OTL under Nicholas I, but nevertheless she may well be seen as the despotic, semi-Asiatic power as in our own timeline.

Oh, and as promised, here's a map of the world at the beginning of 1831. A larger version can be found here.

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By contrast, the victory of the Conservative Monarchies in the East had boosted their own profiles, as well as the confidence of their rulers. Although far from being a great power, Frederick Wilhelm had restored Prussia as a kingdom at the very least, and now eyed further opportunities for expansion in the future.

I am impressed with how intelligent and meticulous this Frederick Wilhelm is compared to his OTL counterpart, so what changed?

I am holding out on France and the American Republic backing revolts in Spanish America in the future to compensate.
 
Not what I expected, but good enough! Frederick Wilhelm must have balls the size of mountains to orchestrate and succeed at such a level of trickery. How does Britain feel about this?

But what of Persia and the Ottomans? With this new Holy Alliance to their north and a sense of begrudging “hang together or hang separately” between the two, will they begin probing for European allies or trying to meld together their own holy league?
 

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Ah Thermidore. You never fail to show up. Situation in Europe has stabilized, but theres going to be serious ripples from the Iron curtain showing up.

How many people are in the French Canada? I can imagine its relative stability and growing extraction economy would draw in many immigrants from the motherland and abroad.

Similarly, I notice a codification of borders in New Spain and its north. Does this mean theres been proper settlement?

And also, whats been going on in Saint Domingue? No indemnity payments forced upon it as far as I know, and it seems alt Toussaint has kept the policy of ruling both colonies in a personal union. Those are pretty big changes thus far as the first sugar boom starts to slow down (what with Brazil and Cuba taking more of the market share). Wonder if the successor has decided to go the Henri or Alexandre path.
 
I don't know about you, but to me at least it seems like the author has been building up this "Afsharid Iran" to be a major player down the line. Hasn't been mentioned for a while but it at least looks pretty swol on the map.
I meant East Asian, we all know Iran is OP. By 1900 I bet their population will be like 60 million.

@Nassirisimo what is the capital/largest city? What's it's population, and can we get more on how it's more modern than the rest of Iran and is also on par with European capitals?
 
With India being under native rule for the foreseeable future, would there be any need for China or Japan to modernize? British-led Western projection of power into the region is likely more commercial based than anything, and I doubt any sustained military campaign the scale of the opium wars would be viable. Even Russia might not do much--IIRC there was a lingering fear of a Chinese reconquest of Outer Manchuria until very late in Imperial Russia's existence--especially after the Ili crisis.

With chaos in Europe and foreseeable European competition in the Indian Ocean, will Iran or the Ottomans see integration into the European alliance system?
 
Looking at that world map, I wonder what the average Ottoman turk thinks when s/he looks at a map and see the godzilla-sized Iran sitting right next door.

Also, didn't expect the Mossi to make an appearance in West Africa!
 
Looking at that world map, I wonder what the average Ottoman turk thinks when s/he looks at a map and see the godzilla-sized Iran sitting right next door.
Well to be fair most of it just empty desert populated by nomadic tribes. But certainly this tl Iran urban population are larger than otl thanks to the stability Afsharid brought.
 
With India being under native rule for the foreseeable future, would there be any need for China or Japan to modernize? British-led Western projection of power into the region is likely more commercial based than anything, and I doubt any sustained military campaign the scale of the opium wars would be viable. Even Russia might not do much--IIRC there was a lingering fear of a Chinese reconquest of Outer Manchuria until very late in Imperial Russia's existence--especially after the Ili crisis.

With chaos in Europe and foreseeable European competition in the Indian Ocean, will Iran or the Ottomans see integration into the European alliance system?
Indeed, the Far East sans European incursions likely doesn't see nearly as much social/economic/political upheaval (no mass unemployment of porters in Qing China due to Europeans opening up new ports for trade, the Japanese gold standard doesn't get exploited, less cholera, etc.) but there's also no pressure to purchase arms and naval equipment in the quantities that OTL China and Japan bought from Europe. Fewer students would be sent to the West to study, for one, since the Eastern world still remains Sinocentric. Technology would trickle in but it won't be at the pace of Meiji Japan, almost certainly.

Though unrest and militancy were on the rise even in the absence of Western influences OTL. The Qing and Joseon were having increasingly severe revolts leading into the 18th century (the latter having rebellion after rebellion even during isolationism in the 19th century) and Japan is going to get hit by multiple significant natural disasters in the 1850s, just due to geological events being set in stone. While the Europe being limited does buy all three more time, without significant changes to the institutions in those countries, the late 19th century/early 20th century would've likely signaled in an age of revolution in East Asia.
 
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