A respite will be good for Claude - maybe here she can even live a little longer. Hopefully Mary Boleyn keeps to her place as Francis's 'lady love' and doesn't cause any headaches for madeleine or marguerite (but a headache or two for louise would be more than fine at this point)
 
A respite will be good for Claude - maybe here she can even live a little longer. Hopefully Mary Boleyn keeps to her place as Francis's 'lady love' and doesn't cause any headaches for madeleine or marguerite (but a headache or two for louise would be more than fine at this point)
Louise do not care at all, her son can do nothing wrong, remember? And after dealing with her very angry father Mary Boleyn will have no intention at all to cause any trouble for Marguerite, Madeleine or Claude so she will be a devoted and affectionate mistress for Francis and will stay at her place, without thinking to disrespect the royal ladies
 
Cavorting with an Ambassador's daughter heh? Tut tut Francis.

Wonder if Mary is smarter than she lets on and is gathering intel for the Earl and England?

Well wishes for the baby Claude.
 
Cavorting with an Ambassador's daughter heh? Tut tut Francis.

Wonder if Mary is smarter than she lets on and is gathering intel for the Earl and England?

Well wishes for the baby Claude.
Francis is well, Francis… I can guarantee to you who Mary Boleyn is not doing anything of that kind (but that do not exclude who in someone could use her for that, without her knowledge)… Claude (and Madeleine and Renee also) thank you for the well wishes
 
Louise do not care at all, her son can do nothing wrong, remember? And after dealing with her very angry father Mary Boleyn will have no intention at all to cause any trouble for Marguerite, Madeleine or Claude so she will be a devoted and affectionate mistress for Francis and will stay at her place, without thinking to disrespect the royal ladies
Well that's good to know she wasn't the political meddling type iotl either
 
1519 - Reacting to surprising news
Lucrezia, Duchess of Ferrara continued to feel the weight of her pregnancy but her mood was very good, thanks to the long planned visit of her firstborn son, Rodrigo, Duke of Bisceglie together with his wife Giulia and their little son Alfonso. Her friend Isabella del Balzo, Giulia’s mother, was equally happy as her younger daughter Isabella, wife of the Regent of Montferrat, not only had joined them together with her little daughter Maria, but had also announced at surprise her second pregnancy. The Duke of Ferrara had not been exactly glad for the visit of his stepson and cousins but he had no true reason for forbid it and Lucrezia needed the distraction who that visit would give her (plus the Duke knew who his prohibition would surely have a devastating effect on Lucrezia’s already frail health, putting at risk her and the child) so he had simply ignored the guests.

The first six or seven days of the visit had gone smoothly as everyone enjoyed to be together and Lucrezia’s three younger children (as Ercole and Ippolito gave their full allegiance to their father so they were almost never in company of their mother) liked the guests. The only worry for Lucrezia and Isabella were the effect who the claims of the Duke of Savoy could have on the young King of Spain and what that could mean for Rodrigo, Giulia and also Isabella’s son Ferrante, who was at the Spanish court, more as family member than as hostage, but still likely to be in great danger if suspected of some treasonous actions. Alfonso, in that joined by his recently widowed sister Isabella (and the sorrow for the death of Francesco Gonzaga, to which she had always been close, had not helped Lucrezia’s health and mood) had made clear his opinion to his wife and also to his aunt by marriage, and with the usual courtesy, meaning who Isabella had been greatly distressed and Lucrezia, weakened by her pregnancy, had needed the intervention of the doctor and a day in the bed for recovering. Now the arrival of a messenger from Spain with a letter for Isabella del Balzo had given the Duke the chance to see his prevision vindicated so the Duke had taken the letter and dismissed the messenger promising to give immediately them to the Dowager Queen of Naples. Alfonso’s arrival with the letters had naturally worried all the Aragonas and Isabella‘s hands trembled while she opened the letter, written from Ferrante of Calabria, and her shock while she was reading it was evident. Once she had finished to read the letter Isabella had let it fallen without saying a word, in the general worrying, as they feared the worst.

Rodrigo had taken the other message included in the letter opening it and reading it with an expression of total incredulity, like he was unable to believe to what he was reading, before passing it to his stepfather without a word. Lucrezia, Giulia and the younger Isabella had been already reassured by Rodrigo’s expression about the nature of the news so they ignored the smile with which Alfonso had starting to read the sheet, who was an official proclamation by Fernando III of Aragon (and VI of Castile) in which the young King “in recognition of the loyalty always demonstrated and in the joyous occasion of his wedding to our dear grandmother Germaine” gave back the Kingdom of Naples to Ferrante V, son of King Frederick, and after him to “his next heir from his body or the blood of his mother Queen Isabella, under condition of the marriage of said heir to one of our own children or a proxy of our choice”. Isabella del Balzo meanwhile had recovered from the effect of the surprise and had added who, from the letter of Ferrante, the last act of King Fernando as King of Naples had been the cession of all the lands of Taranto, Lecce, Andria and Altamura (once held by Frederick as either inheritance from his mother or in name of his second wife) to Giulia of Aragon and her husband Rodrigo of Aragon, making them the most powerful nobles of the Kingdom. Lucrezia naturally was overjoyed with the news and her look at her husband fully expressed that. The Duke of Ferrara commented who such decision was extremely unexpected and unpredictable but he congratulated them for their good luck and would left them to their celebrations, recommending to Lucrezia to not exaggerate as that could harm her health and the baby.
The Duchess of Ferrara and the Dowager Queen of Naples exchanged a glance, remembering well how much the Duke had cared about the health of his wife and baby just a month earlier, but agreed to not talk about that and enjoy the moment.
Lucrezia was a little sad to lose Isabella’s company but was glad for her dear friend’s good luck as now Isabella would be back in Naples or her lands and would be able to see her two elder children very often and she would be able to travel for visiting her namesake daughter in Montferrat (and Lucrezia knew who she also would be welcomed in Naples if and when she would be able to make a visit there. She suspected who getting Alfonso‘s permission, once recovered from the pregnancy, would not be too hard as her insufferable sister-in-law Isabella would gladly substitute her as first lady of the Estense Court, during her absence, considering what had heard about the strained relationship between Isabella and her eldest son Frederick, the new Marquis of Mantua).
 
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Ooh Naples may end up a good deal different here, how exciting!
Yes, Naples has definitely a very different fate than OTL and is back under Trastamara of Aragon rulers, likely for long time (Rodrigo of Bisceglie is a male line grandson of Alfonso II, from a recognized son instead of a legitimate one but still… he and Giulia married precisely for guaranteeing the survival of a line of the Aragorn-Naples with a strong claim on that Crown if Ferrante died childless in exile)…
 
Why did Spain restore Naples's independence again?
Because Fernando is not his grandfather or father, and he is close to Ferrante and want see Germaine happy and with a chance of her own family and respected in her kingdom, plus political reasons: he know who he can trust Ferrante and Germaine (and has no reason to fear Giulia and Rodrigo) and need to block any claim from Savoy (the Duke is married to the elder daughter of Ferrante’s late half-sister) and the best way for taking away their claim is restoring Naples to the legitimate heir from the line of Ferdinand I of Naples, and in that circumstance restrict the succession to the heirs of Ferrante and his full sisters (and Naples has precedents with passing over females plus the children of Giulia will be Trastamaras like Ferrante’s).
Glad to see Lucrezia doing well.
Lucrezia is doing well for now... for now she has not lost any children in the last years and the good news for her family (starting with the visits of her elder son and the birth of her first grandson) are doing a lot for lifting her spirit… still we need to see if the outcome of this pregnancy will be the OTL one or not…
 
1519 - How deal with a bad situation
Lady Anne Boleyn, younger daughter of the Earl of Wiltshire (her father and maternal uncle would say who she was Wiltshire‘s only daughter now) was distraught since she had heard the terrible news from France as she was the most directly afflicted by the immoral conduct of her sister Mary, who greatly diminished her own chances to make a good match… and who that had to happen when she had just meet, thanks to her brother George, an interesting young man who would be a very worth match for her and was smitten with her as she was with him. She had started to dream to marry him and then Mary‘s actions had shattered that dreams as she knew who the father of her beloved now would never accept a match between her and his heir. Well, she had still the confort of the friendship of Queen Eleanor, who had more than once demonstrated who her high opinion of Anne had not changed for the actions of Mary and both she and the King had made clear among the Court who nobody should presume who lady Anne Boleyn had the same loose morals of her elder sister as the two Boleyn girls were the complete opposite under many aspects. Her step-grandmother, the Duchess of Norfolk and her aunt by marriage, the Countess of Surrey, together with the latter’s elder sister, the Countess of Westmorland, had recently told Anne who she had been very lucky in being able to make such powerful friends, but that would not change her ruin. Anne had been close to be reduced in tears by the way in which her relatives were disparaging her when the Countess of Wiltshire had intervened in defence of her daughter, reminding to her sisters-in-law who they were granddaughters of an executed traitor (and they had more among their blood relatives) adding who she was not surprised who Katherine of Surrey, while married to her own brother, was so quick to join Elizabeth of Westmorland as they were jealous who Anne and herself had the royal favour who they had enjoyed under the previous Queen but had lost under Queen Eleanor. The Duchess of Norfolk had retreated as she had lost any interest in the conversation, while the other two were searching a way to continue their belittlement of Anne when the latter decided to use the opening offered by her mother for getting her own revenge saying who was not her fault if Buckingham‘s daughters had been so haughty to pretend to teach to Queen Eleanor what she should do or not, when she arrived, and pretending who she would keep her household in the same way who her late aunt had, eliminating any chance to get Eleanor‘s favour as their Queen would not forget who had been far too loyal to the woman who had once stolen her groom or tried to force a princess of Burgundy to mould her household following Spanish customs…
 
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Here Elizabeth Stafford has married Westmoreland as originally planned while Thomas Howard has remarried to Katherine Stafford (as his request for Elizabeth’s hand had arrived too late), and their wedding at the moment is good but that do not change the way in which Buckingham’s daughters see Anne Boleyn or her mother on which they look down as upstarts while knowing perfectly who that is untrue
 
Damn nice to see Elizabeth Howard put her relations in their place!
Yes, that was satisfying to write. The Countess of Westmoreland and the Countess of Surrey are lucky who they had to deal only with the Countess of Wiltshire and Queen Eleanor had not heard anything about that as the Stafford sisters do not have her sympathies unlike the Boleyns
 
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