2018 Presidential Election

I think Josh is too combatative to run for elected office.
Josh would get elected and two weeks after being sworn in asked to resign. He'd not see he did anything wrong as well.

"All I did was threaten to beat him with a tire iron."
"What about calling the Senate Majority Leader the product of inbreeding?"
"I d think we all think it is true."
 
Ah that was the political operative, Josh, he would understand that going off the reservation & holding or seeking political office is not something that will profit him politically; he acquitted himself admirably as Matt Santos’ campaign manager & displayed a certain kind of maturity, he just needs his own Leo McGarry/Josh Lyman to keep him on straight & narrow. Just an idea, it would be fun to see a storyline within Josh as a candidate!
 
If the theory put forward by ajm8888 holds true, then Josh’s prospects in the private sector would be just as negative! Nope I think a storyline should be developed in which he decides to pursue elective office! His decision could be prompted by how successful Sam Seaborn has been in the political arena; if anything Josh reminded me as a very competitive operator, so seeing Seaborn in the ultimate of political positions might spike some sort of envy on his part. Also the fact that Will Bailey will be WHCOS will no doubt trigger even more angst. Well it’s just a storyline suggestion!
 
If the theory put forward by ajm8888 holds true, then Josh’s prospects in the private sector would be just as negative! Nope I think a storyline should be developed in which he decides to pursue elective office! His decision could be prompted by how successful Sam Seaborn has been in the political arena; if anything Josh reminded me as a very competitive operator, so seeing Seaborn in the ultimate of political positions might spike some sort of envy on his part. Also the fact that Will Bailey will be WHCOS will no doubt trigger even more angst. Well it’s just a storyline suggestion!
Mayor of the largest city of Connecticut at best.
 
Mayor of the largest city of Connecticut at best.
I agree. There is a big difference between Sam and Josh. Sam was always shown as an “aw-shucks” kind of guy who you would like to have date your daughter and would be happy to vote for. He was strong when he needed to be but also knew when to take a step back, giving him the possibility of becoming a good politician.

Josh, on the other hand, always reminded me more of Bobby Kennedy but without the liberal idealism. Don’t get me wrong, I love josh (he was probably my favorite character), but his temper is legendary in democratic politics. He wasn’t able to effectively serve as Chief of Staff or as part of the Seaborn campaign. I find it very hard to believe that he would serve much better as a candidate with every move being scrutinized. Josh has also burned a lot of bridges, something that would not help him.

And to the point that this could spark an interest for him, he has been involved in this kind of work for 20 years. If he hasn’t felt that big by now I don’t think he ever will.

I assume that Josh will stay in the private sector, where I imagine he has been since leaving the DNC.
 
I agree. There is a big difference between Sam and Josh. Sam was always shown as an “aw-shucks” kind of guy who you would like to have date your daughter and would be happy to vote for. He was strong when he needed to be but also knew when to take a step back, giving him the possibility of becoming a good politician.

Josh, on the other hand, always reminded me more of Bobby Kennedy but without the liberal idealism. Don’t get me wrong, I love josh (he was probably my favorite character), but his temper is legendary in democratic politics. He wasn’t able to effectively serve as Chief of Staff or as part of the Seaborn campaign. I find it very hard to believe that he would serve much better as a candidate with every move being scrutinized. Josh has also burned a lot of bridges, something that would not help him.

And to the point that this could spark an interest for him, he has been involved in this kind of work for 20 years. If he hasn’t felt that big by now I don’t think he ever will.

I assume that Josh will stay in the private sector, where I imagine he has been since leaving the DNC.
Plenty of big companies like a guy like Josh, even with his temper. And the pay would make Josh click his heels. I wonder if Hollis has his Jeff Bezos expy to Hollis's Bill Gates?
 
I went and did some digging in New York's history in the old thread, and there was a lot of information. Here's a list of New York's mayors I compiled based on various information in the thread, and some speculation.
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Mayors:
  • In 1977, New York City was a mess. Mayor Abraham Beame was highly unpopular and came in third in the Democratic primary, which was won by Ed Koch. The second place candidate, Mario Cuomo, ran on the Liberal Party line. This split, along with unpopularity of the Democratic Party thanks to Beame, led to Republican candidate Blake Marshall, Sr. winning easily. A successful mayor, Marshall turned the city around and was elected to two more terms, defeating Congressman Mark Richardson in 1981 and Congressman Jack Remsen in 1985.
  • John Pietrovich, the son of Russian immigrants, was appointed as a deputy mayor by Marshall in 1980, and was largely credited with the city's economic recovery. Sometimes called the power behind the throne, Pietrovich turned down an opportunity to serve in the cabinet of Ronald Reagan. However, when Pietrovich became mayor, the city fell into economic crisis again. This time, he was unable to resolve it, and his own abrasive attitude cost him allies in city and state politics. Additionally, Pietrovich's chief of staff had been indicted on chargers of insider trading. Floundering on his own, Pietrovich narrowly fended off a primary challenge in 1993 before losing the election.
  • Andrew Thorn, the young Assistant District Attorney, won the Democratic nomination in 1993 against other candidates eager to have a go at the unpopular Pietrovich. This was attributed by his opponents to his father's money. Thorn was also cross-nominated by the Liberal, Conservative, Independence, and Reform parties, a stunning rebuke to Pietrovich. The race was one of money as much as it was of politics, as both candidates poured their own money into the race. Ultimately, Thorn won, and achieved his moniker of the boy wonder, becoming the youngest mayor in city history. Thorn's mayoralty was a success and he was re-elected in 1997. In 2000, he ran for the United States Senate and won that race. He resigned on December 31, 2000 in order to take that office.
  • Thorn was succeeded by Leonard Hoffman, the City Comptroller, in accordance with the succession statutes implemented in 1995. Hoffman ran for election to a full term in 2001 but was surprisingly defeated.
  • Blake Marshall, Jr., the famous son of a famous father, was the biggest name in the city Republican Party in 2001. The Republicans begged him to run, believing he was their only shot against Hoffman, who was relatively popular. Although Marshall was preparing to retire from politics, having come to dislike the City Council, his father convinced him to enter the race. Marshall won a narrow victory over Hoffman, running up the vote in Manhattan and relying on exceptionally high turnout in Staten Island. However, his time as mayor was middling at best, as he often found himself bored with the job and his staff was constantly involved in scandal. Although Marshall himself was clean, it was easy to see that he was not his father, and he lost re-election while going through his second divorce.
  • Damon Paccoli, the former Manhattan Borough President, was elected City Comptroller in the 2000 special election to succeed Hoffman. By 2005, he was the top candidate for the Democratic nomination, which he won easily. Despite Marshall's best efforts, Paccoli defeated him by eight points. Paccoli's tenure was rocked immediately by a teacher's strike, which prompted the city education crisis of 2007-08. The crisis was resolved, but Paccoli was in hot water. In 2009, Bobby Dyson, a black teenager, was shot by a cop in the Bronx. The public response, rioting, and Paccoli's failure to sufficiently address the situation, combined with the onset of the national recession at the end of his term, resulted in his loss in 2009.
  • Jesse Crase, the insider outsider high powered prosecutor, won the Republican nomination in 2009 and squared off against Paccoli at the height of his unpopularity. Although Crase advantageously positioned, he was hurt by his liberal positions on some issues, which decreased his support among conservative Republicans. There were also rumors of campaign finance violations swirling around his campaign. Crase won a narrow victory by 1.5%. Of course, the perfect storm only strikes once, and Crase soon found that New York was not really a fan of his style. Although Crase presided over economic recovery, it was ultimately partisanship that sealed his fate.
  • Crase was defeated by City Council Speaker Richard Corey, the former hero cop who became speaker after incumbent Gene Tolone resigned in the face of corruption charges. Corey was initially favored against Crase, but the recovering economy and highly publicized falling crime rates helped Crase recover in the polls. On election day, Corey won with big numbers in the non-Staten Island boroughs and exceeded the polls. Corey was mayor during the 2015 Times Square attacks and led the city through the crisis ably. Highly popular, he was easily re-elected over Andy Halltings in 2017, making him the first mayor to be re-elected since Andrew Thorn 20 years prior. He was sworn into his second term on January 1, 2018. There is speculation that he will run for a third term in 2021.
Some notes:
  • Blake Marshall, who ran for governor in 2010, was mentioned as being a former one-term mayor. Additionally, he was cast as Mark Moses, whose age would place him sometime recently. However, in Andrew Thorn's bio, John Pietrovich was mentioned as having served as deputy mayor under Blake Marshall. To rectify this, I introduced Blake Marshall, Sr.
  • As Thorn would have to resign from the mayoralty to assume his senate seat on January 3, 2001, I introduced Leonard Hoffman as his successor.
  • List of comptrollers: Hoffman (1994-2000), Paccoli (2000-2005), Benjamin Vargas (2006-2013), Gerald Kim (new character) (2014-present)
New casting:
  • Blake Marshall, Sr. (Richard Schaal)
  • John Pietrovich (James Sikking)
  • Leonard Hoffman (Peter Jacobson)
 
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But for Josh's private sector job what about Gobi Global?
I don’t see him being with a corporation. He might hold a board seat or two (mostly symbolic) but I think he would get bored very quickly there. I see him having his own consulting shop or being a partner in a large one.
 
Next: the list of governors of New York. This was much easier since all the information was already there.
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  • Jack Stephens, the famous Mr. Moderate, was the heir to Nelson Rockefeller's legacy. A well known figure in Republican circles, Stephens was nominated in 1990 to face off against liberal lion Mario Cuomo. Aided by the victory of Owen Lassiter in the presidential election, Stephens won a narrow upset victory over Cuomo, giving New York Republicans new life. Stephens was highly popular in the entire state, bringing Senate Republicans and Assembly Democrats together. Stephens won a landslide re-election in 1994, even winning Queens and Manhattan in the city. In 1998, Stephens won re-election over Andrew Cuomo, son of the former governor, who shot his shot too early, upsetting many Democrats in the process. As Stephens won re-election in the same year Josiah Bartlet won the state in the presidential election, Stephens became a popular speculative name for the 2002 presidential nomination. After declaring his candidacy in 2001, Stephens soon found that his brand was not appealing to the national Republican base, and quickly dropped out to run for a fourth term as governor. However, his abortive presidential campaign hurt his reputation in the state, and his lieutenant, Thomas Killian, who hoped to become governor himself, split with him. Stephens secured renomination against Killian but lost the general election.
  • George William "Bill" Parker IV, the fourth in the line of rich and famous men of that same name, was a fixture in the Democratic Party, as one of the biggest party donors in the nation. Parker had long hoped that his son, George V, would become governor and eventually president one day, and steered him away from the family business to keep him clean of the financial world. However, George V was paralyzed in a skiing accident in winter 2002, right before he declared his campaign for governor. Not to be deterred, George IV at first toyed with making his son Christopher run instead, but eventually decided to do it himself. And why not? All the groundwork was there, the money was in place, the right people were on board. Parker easily won the Democratic nomination and went on to defeat Jack Stephens. Parker was a fairly average governor, never very popular or unpopular, and was palatable enough to voters to be elected to a second term. George, a friend of attorney Noah Lyman, supported his son Josh's political endeavors and always donated to any campaign Josh worked on. Just as he was an early supporter of Josiah Bartlet, he was also a supporter of Matt Santos, and used his position to get his son Christopher appointed Secretary of the Treasury. Christopher's tenure at that position was quite dismal, which reflected poorly on the elder Parker. In 2010, he announced his retirement, ostensibly due to his advanced age, and focused on supporting the ill-fated Santos re-election campaign.
  • Matthew Lewis, the New York Country District Attorney from 2006, ran for the Democratic nomination against Lieutenant Governor Edwin Lane and Attorney General Andrew Cuomo, who was trying to make a comeback. Lewis was the only candidate of the three untouched by scandal, and prosecuted several high profile cases in the city that boosted his name recognition. After prevailing in the primary, Lewis defeated former New York City Mayor Blake Marshall, Jr., who had preceded him as District Attorney. Although he looked to be a standard Democrat, Lewis's governorship was plagued by scandal, which he mismanaged. He faced a surprisingly formidable challenge from Rob Cole in 2014, and flailed in the debate against him. Lewis was defeated and has since rejected a return to politics.
  • Rob Cole, a former state senator and teacher, rocketed to the forefront of the state Republican Party after his fierce battle with Andrew Thorn for the Senate two years earlier. With the money flowing and the Lewis campaign collapsing, Cole delivered the death blow in the debate and won the election. However, Cole was not able to govern effectively as a Republican, and with Lewis out of the picture, Cole fell in popularity. In his re-election bid, he faced Attorney General Hakeem El-Amin, who was far more popular. Cole lost and will be leaving office on December 31, 2018.
  • Hakeem El-Amin, who came to the United States as a child, was a well known advocate for refugees and a civil liberties lawyer before running for Attorney General of New York in 2010, when the position was vacated by Andrew Cuomo. He won re-election in 2014 even as Matthew Lewis lost, defeating a token Republican candidate who barely ran a campaign. In 2018, he ran against Rob Cole for governor, as many expected, and won. He will be taking office on January 1, 2019.
Notes:
  • Lewis was cast as Matthew Broderick and Peter Gallagher at different times. I went with Broderick.
  • Really wish Lewis had been Attorney General instead of NYC DA. Not like a lot of people outside of the city are inclined to vote for a district attorney. Hasn't happened since Dewey.
  • Mario and Chris Cuomo have both been mentioned, so I decided to include Andrew Cuomo but write him out as a serial loser.
  • All lieutenant governors made up by me.
New casting:
  • George W. Parker IV (Garry Marshall)
  • Hakeem El-Amin (Dean Obeidallah)
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Figured that now that we're, it would be time to update some infoboxes for the main cast from the original show. Leo and Presidents Bartlet and Santos were previously done, and there are a few other main cast members (Sam, C.J., Abby Bartlet, Will) who will be taking up new jobs in January, and others that are still under consideration for positions in the upcoming administration. So without further ado, here are some of the ones who for whatever reason probably won't need to have their infobox updated come January:

  • Josh and Donna have been established as being partners, but unmarried.
  • It's never been established when Toby and Andy were first married, but I figured it would have been just a few years before Bartlet's election at most.
  • Since Mandy was last seen in the episode where Bartlet (and Josh) are shot at Rosslyn, but doesn't appear in the two-parter taking place immediately afterwords, I decided that her resignation/whatever that caused her to leave was delayed for a week since the White House obviously had bigger things to deal with without being down a woman after the president was nearly killed.
  • Mandy was established as being the chair of Matt Skinner's presidential campaign in 2009, so I had her switch registration for a few years.



I honestly was thinking of writing something about the Seaborns and their childlessness before this conversation even occurred, but decided that it might be better to wait until after the inauguration since there's going to be plenty happening as Walken leaves and Sam prepares to take over.

Isn't Mandy dead?
 
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Future First Lady Laura Parker Seaborn graces the cover of this months Harper's Bazaar where she candidly speaks about life on the campaign trail, what kind of first lady she would be, and what Senator Seaborn is really like. On newsstands now.
 
nbs.com

Friday, December 14th 2018

Bailey resigns Air Force Reserve commission in anticipation of White House role

Congressman Will Bailey (D-OR) has resigned his commission in the Air Force Reserves ahead of becoming the White House Chief of Staff when President-elect Sam Seaborn takes office in January. Bailey, who retires as a lieutenant colonel in the Air Force Reserve, said that it was one of his the "greatest honors of [his] life" to have served his country in both the military and government. "Although I have continued my service while in Congress and in other White House leadership positions under President Josiah Bartlet, I know that the duties of the White House Chief of Staff are too important to the president and to the nation to justify the continuation of my military career," Bailey said in a statement. "I wish to thank all the great men and women I have served alongside with in, and all those who continue to wear the uniform for this wonderful period in my life."

Bailey, whose father General Thomas Bailey served as Supreme Allied Commander Europe, was born and raised in Belgium on American and NATO military bases. After graduating law school, Bailey was commissioned as a second lieutenant in 1995 and spent his career in the Judge Advocate General's Corps (JAG Corps) serving primarily as the lawyer for accused airmen and officers in the Air Force. Bailey's wife, National Security Adviser Kate Harper, who is also reportedly under consideration for a position in the incoming administration, retired from the Navy with the rank of commander earlier this year after 28 years of service.

Anyone opposed to a Bezos type guy that is not fond of Frank Hollis?

Maybe run it by Mark and disputed beforehand?
 
And finally, we have New York's senators. This was more difficult, as there was some conflicting information.
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  • In 1980, Javits lost renomination to Al D'Amato. He declined to run as the Liberal candidate. Democratic candidate Congressman Michael Casey defeated D'Amato. Casey was re-elected in 1986. In 1990, he resigned following the death of his son in a car accident. Casey would later run for president in 1994. Governor Mario Cuomo appointed Mike Jackson, the future Secretary of Labor, as Jackson's replacement. Jackson lost the November 1990 special election to Harvey Beame at the same time Cuomo lost re-election to Jack Stephens. Beame was defeated for re-election in 1992 by Michael Daschowitz.
New casting:
  • Anthony Gianelli (Joseph Campanella)
  • Harvey Beame (Dan Hedaya)
 
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